Traditional Vs. Matched

Muckster

Platinum Member
I like traditional grip and can do many more things especially jazz playing with it than i can matched. I used to buy in to the "less power" attitude until i saw Stewart Copeland play. Bottom line is use whatever grip is comfortable.
 

Frost

Silver Member
There is no "lack of power" in traditional. What is true is that to generate the same power in traditional as you can in matched, you must be very flexible in your forearm.

I use matched at all times, except when I play restaurant tabletops with chopsticks. They are so small I find them hard to control in matched.

Casper
It's not the same for everyone but many people find it far harder to achieve the same kind of strength in traditional compared to matched, I think it has something to do with placing your thumb on top of the stick.

I use traditional for brushes, I don't dislike it. It's a matter of preference but I think you will find that a lot of drummers find reach and power can be an issue in traditional grip.
 

bamdrummer

Senior Member
For me, I use trad. grip for brushes but I use matched for everything else. Personally, I think its whatever you're comfortable with and whatever you learn to play with is what you'll be good at. Im sure there are pros and cons but they're slight and I think they sorta become non existent when either grip is in the hands of a skilled player like Jojo or the like.
 

Toby_Jackson

Senior Member
We really don't need another thread about this. There are already like a million on every good drum forum I've ever been too.

Here's how I see it: each grip has it's uses, and whichever grip feels good to you in a particular situation is the one you should use. Check out master players, figure out what they're up to and then find out if it works for you. If not, no sweat. It's music - just make sure it sounds good and feels good, and don't worry about people that use a different technique to get the same sound (there are multiple paths to victory!)

For the record I play about 85% trad in everything from restaurant jazz up to slamming big rock and roll backbeats. I'll often switch to matched if I'm playing a whole set of REALLY loud, hardcore-style rock or blasting metal, sometimes in light JB-style funk and hip-hop, or if I just feel like it, you know?
 

Big Foot

Silver Member
I like one of JoJo Mayer's reason for trad grip - "it makes you look like you know what you're doing".

I, also, find it works better for sweeping the left hand when using brushes.
 

Overg

Senior Member
As someone here said if it is so good, and ghost notes sounds so heavenly, and it has such an amazing touc and feel,then why not use both hands with trad? How can you make great ghost notes only on the left hand? There is no doubt about it, that for today kits and music, there is no logic what so ever to play that way. It's very uncomfortable to move around the kit with it
 
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Jazz+Ska!

Member
Well, if you play trad with both hands, how do you play the ride? The hi hat? I think most people don't like it because most people don't play it. And when they do, their hand is not accustomed to holding the stick that way so they pull their wrist up or twist their hand and kind of poke down at the drum. The best way to play it on a kit is to drop your hand down, palm facing straight up. The stick is grasped by your thumb. You technically could play traditional grip with your pinkie to middle finger chopped off. Keep your fingers fairly loose. You don't have to tilt your snare drum to play trad on it. Then you will see it is better for kit then most suppose.
I played on a snare line, so of course I'll prefer trad. But, like many have said already, whatever works for you and makes you sound good. . Whatever. I mean I wasn't trying to start an argument. Just curious on others opinions outside of the drummers I know personally. I guess I should have said I preferred trad, and not say I necessarily thought it was superior by leaps and bounds to matched. Should've been more careful with my words. And, by the way, I also play matched sometimes and could list reasons of why it is good, too.
 

Overg

Senior Member
Well, if you play trad with both hands, how do you play the ride? The hi hat? I think most people don't like it because most people don't play it. And when they do, their hand is not accustomed to holding the stick that way so they pull their wrist up or twist their hand and kind of poke down at the drum. The best way to play it on a kit is to drop your hand down, palm facing straight up. The stick is grasped by your thumb. You technically could play traditional grip with your pinkie to middle finger chopped off. Keep your fingers fairly loose. You don't have to tilt your snare drum to play trad on it. Then you will see it is better for kit then most suppose.
I played on a snare line, so of course I'll prefer trad. But, like many have said already, whatever works for you and makes you sound good. . Whatever. I mean I wasn't trying to start an argument. Just curious on others opinions outside of the drummers I know personally. I guess I should have said I preferred trad, and not say I necessarily thought it was superior by leaps and bounds to matched. Should've been more careful with my words. And, by the way, I also play matched sometimes and could list reasons of why it is good, too.
well I can ask then, if it is impossible and akward to play the ride, how come it is ok to play all the toms with the left hand? Isn't it the same?
 

Fiery

Silver Member
I'm actually starting to feel there's some good things about traditional grip.

First off all it affects your posture. Well it really shouldn't, your back should be straight and shoulders on about the same level, but I'm not talking about visually.
I have never, ever, ever, ever seen a person playing traditional grip keep their shoulders level all the time, except drumline snare drummers. Even they will often lean to the left on difficult parts when playing solo.

... So what if those ancient snare guys actually thought this was the optimal thing to do. They could have put the snares directly in front of them you know, without tilting it.
The snares back then were very deep, they'd be hitting them with their knees all the time if they placed them directly in front.
 
I used matched, because, well, I am a newbie. Traditional may come later on in my lessons. It looks freakin' cool, tho, especially when Joe Morello is using it! His left hand scares me!
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
We really don't need another thread about this. There are already like a million on every good drum forum I've ever been too.

Here's how I see it: each grip has it's uses, and whichever grip feels good to you in a particular situation is the one you should use. Check out master players, figure out what they're up to and then find out if it works for you. If not, no sweat. It's music - just make sure it sounds good and feels good, and don't worry about people that use a different technique to get the same sound (there are multiple paths to victory!)
It's like the thoughts were ripped straight from my head. Pretty much sums up my thoughts on the matter.
 

Drum-Head

Silver Member
I have never, ever, ever, ever seen a person playing traditional grip keep their shoulders level all the time, except drumline snare drummers. Even they will often lean to the left on difficult parts when playing solo.
I noticed that Virgil Donati pays a lot of attention in keeping his shoulders leveled.

But that's one thing about traditional grip - while I think it doesn't matter which ever grip one goes with, I'm not sure that trad is that good on your back and shoulders over the years. I've seen quite a few drum teachers in my old drums school or even other drummers I've met having their bodies saying "it's paytime son".
 
C

Casper "DrPowerStroke" Paludan

Guest
Thank the gods I'm not the only one who's had that problem!
You are not, Mike, and it is a serious problem, one that needs addressing! There was one New york badass drummer who used the big cooking chopsticks to great effect, live! I think he had small hands.

C
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
this video will finish the debate, take a look at the master explaining grips http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0V4Aqs2D48
Seen it/heard it before........personally it settles nothing for me, save for the fact that Buddy prefers traditional grip.

Buddy also tears shreads through his accompanying muso's in public: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIP3d6NXD34&playnext_from=TL&videos=64mWkb5CCdg&feature=rec-LGOUT-real_rev-rn-2r-1-HM and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCF9wgMU7es&feature=related and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-ssZeOZkWU&feature=related

....should I also do this?

Play what you are comfortable with my friend.....despite what Buddy may or may not have to say on the matter.
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
Seen it/heard it before........personally it settles nothing for me, save for the fact that Buddy prefers traditional grip.

Buddy also tears shreads through his accompanying muso's in public: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qIP3d6NXD34&playnext_from=TL&videos=64mWkb5CCdg&feature=rec-LGOUT-real_rev-rn-2r-1-HM and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCF9wgMU7es&feature=related and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-ssZeOZkWU&feature=related

....should I also do this?

Play what you are comfortable with my friend.....despite what Buddy may or may not have to say on the matter.
i play traditional because i'm comfortable with it, but part of the reason i changed a few years back
A a player at my school i really looked up to played it
B i was just starting to get into to jazz and it has a soft feel fitting for jazz
C because of this video, i was young and hung on every word from buddy rich, i mean you cant really argue with him he's Buddy Rich!!

even if i chose trad. grip for all the wrong reasons im very glad i did because it helped me with a lot of things like week hand doubles strength and accuracy.

but in the end i agree with you there isn't much of a difference between the grips, just preference. still a cool video tho
 
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