Top 3 Greatest Living Jazz Drummers

A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
gun to my head

Ignacio Berroa
Brian Blade
Eric Harland

in no particular order
 

aydee

Platinum Member
....

The first two are shoe in all -stars:

1) Roy Haynes

2) Jack DeJohnette

The 3rd , I dunno:

Billy Higgins/Brian Blade/Jeff Ballard/Ari Hoenig/Jeff 'Tain Watts/ Bill Stewart/ .. its a long list

...
 

JerryOnDrums

Senior Member
Are we judging based on how they play NOW, or their historical accomplishments? Basically, new-er breed, or old breed? I mean, Roy is still totally killing it, but the days of Now He Sings, Now He Sobs are over...

Old: Roy, Jack, Foster

New: Stewart, Blade, .....and Rodney Green!
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Are we judging based on how they play NOW, or their historical accomplishments? Basically, new-er breed, or old breed? I mean, Roy is still totally killing it, but the days of Now He Sings, Now He Sobs are over...

Old: Roy, Jack, Foster

New: Stewart, Blade, .....and Rodney Green!
I went current taking it as how someone is playing now

but the word "greatest " would for sure refer to guys like Roy and Jack
 

aydee

Platinum Member
...

In the context of music I take great to mean guys who have perfomed at the highest level for a reasonably long period of time, and guys who have changed or influenced the way their instrument is played to the extent that following generations copy their style.

Its my own little def...


PS- Harland is sick!


...
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
1. Roy Haynes. Roy is a historical jazz figure. One of the most important jazz drummers ever. He played with Bird in his early years and helped shape the post-bop vocabulary with his unique sound and approach. Roy's way of playing the snare drum and the sound he got from it was unique in his time; it earned him the nickname "Snap Crackle." His playing with Chick was another chapter of innovation. The drumming on Now He Sings... is one of my favorite jazz performances. A legend. Yeah, he's lost a step in the past couple of years. But at 85, I still saw him swing a band at the Detroit Jazz Festival into bad health. He's a savvy veteran and knows how to get the most out of his physical abilities. He's easily #1 on my list.

2. Jack DeJohnette. Jack has been on the scene for over 40 years but he's lost nothing. He's maybe the last great to arrive in the lineage of great jazz drummers through the golden years of jazz. His playing with Miles was groundbreaking, funky and swinging. And I've enjoyed his solo work and some of the more "out" projects like Song X. But for me, he's at his very best with the Jarrett trio. Jack doesn't play any licks. He seems to have an endless well of fresh ideas that sound completely spontaneous all the time. He's the most pure improviser, listening and playing entirely in the moment, I've ever heard. His touch is impeccable, his drum and cymbal sound tasteful and innovative and he's just pure class.

3. Jimmy Cobb. Jimmy is often overlooked, but this is the man who played on arguably the greatest jazz record of all-time: Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue. Not to mention all those other great Miles and Cannonball Adderley dates. Jimmy was understated and a minimalist, but he swung like a motherf****r on those classic 50s and 60s dates and when he played something, he MEANT IT. Jimmy is still active in NYC and still swings. We need to be honoring this guy while we still have him. He was an integral part of so much music that has meant so much to so many people.
 

haredrums

Silver Member
1. Roy Haynes. Roy is a historical jazz figure. One of the most important jazz drummers ever. He played with Bird in his early years and helped shape the post-bop vocabulary with his unique sound and approach. Roy's way of playing the snare drum and the sound he got from it was unique in his time; it earned him the nickname "Snap Crackle." His playing with Chick was another chapter of innovation. The drumming on Now He Sings... is one of my favorite jazz performances. A legend. Yeah, he's lost a step in the past couple of years. But at 85, I still saw him swing a band at the Detroit Jazz Festival into bad health. He's a savvy veteran and knows how to get the most out of his physical abilities. He's easily #1 on my list.

2. Jack DeJohnette. Jack has been on the scene for over 40 years but he's lost nothing. He's maybe the last great to arrive in the lineage of great jazz drummers through the golden years of jazz. His playing with Miles was groundbreaking, funky and swinging. And I've enjoyed his solo work and some of the more "out" projects like Song X. But for me, he's at his very best with the Jarrett trio. Jack doesn't play any licks. He seems to have an endless well of fresh ideas that sound completely spontaneous all the time. He's the most pure improviser, listening and playing entirely in the moment, I've ever heard. His touch is impeccable, his drum and cymbal sound tasteful and innovative and he's just pure class.

3. Jimmy Cobb. Jimmy is often overlooked, but this is the man who played on arguably the greatest jazz record of all-time: Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue. Not to mention all those other great Miles and Cannonball Adderley dates. Jimmy was understated and a minimalist, but he swung like a motherf****r on those classic 50s and 60s dates and when he played something, he MEANT IT. Jimmy is still active in NYC and still swings. We need to be honoring this guy while we still have him. He was an integral part of so much music that has meant so much to so many people.
Can't argue with this list!
 
Excellent brief per each drummer. Thanks for sharing the knowledge!

1. Roy Haynes. Roy is a historical jazz figure. One of the most important jazz drummers ever. He played with Bird in his early years and helped shape the post-bop vocabulary with his unique sound and approach. Roy's way of playing the snare drum and the sound he got from it was unique in his time; it earned him the nickname "Snap Crackle." His playing with Chick was another chapter of innovation. The drumming on Now He Sings... is one of my favorite jazz performances. A legend. Yeah, he's lost a step in the past couple of years. But at 85, I still saw him swing a band at the Detroit Jazz Festival into bad health. He's a savvy veteran and knows how to get the most out of his physical abilities. He's easily #1 on my list.

2. Jack DeJohnette. Jack has been on the scene for over 40 years but he's lost nothing. He's maybe the last great to arrive in the lineage of great jazz drummers through the golden years of jazz. His playing with Miles was groundbreaking, funky and swinging. And I've enjoyed his solo work and some of the more "out" projects like Song X. But for me, he's at his very best with the Jarrett trio. Jack doesn't play any licks. He seems to have an endless well of fresh ideas that sound completely spontaneous all the time. He's the most pure improviser, listening and playing entirely in the moment, I've ever heard. His touch is impeccable, his drum and cymbal sound tasteful and innovative and he's just pure class.

3. Jimmy Cobb. Jimmy is often overlooked, but this is the man who played on arguably the greatest jazz record of all-time: Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue. Not to mention all those other great Miles and Cannonball Adderley dates. Jimmy was understated and a minimalist, but he swung like a motherf****r on those classic 50s and 60s dates and when he played something, he MEANT IT. Jimmy is still active in NYC and still swings. We need to be honoring this guy while we still have him. He was an integral part of so much music that has meant so much to so many people.
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
Roy, Jack and Ignacio. For younger cats, Brian, Eric and Ari.

Seriously though, there's too many epic drummers, we could have 50 different top threes and they would all be amazing.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
My three favourites, the way they play now (no idea who's the "best"):

Brian Blade
Jack Dejohnette
Joey Baron
 

Steamer

Platinum Member
Jack Dejohnette

Roy Haynes

Lenny White

Yes Lenny White folks..... SERIOUS jazz playing and listening going on here. Check out his playing everybody on the recent double Grammy award winning acoustic jazz trio live recording with Chick and Stanley called "Forever" ...enough said :}
 

Tukaduem

Junior Member
for me right now it's

jeff "tain" watts
eric harland
bill stewart

i dont think they are the best but who i like to listen to......
 
I just want to say that there are really a lot of young jazz drummers (under 35) that are making outstanding contributions to the music while respecting the priceless heritage that is embodied by guys like Roy and Jack - two gentleman whose contribution to the rhythmic language of jazz is astounding.

Also, this thread makes me reflect on the recent loss of Paul Motian. His musical concept defies encapsulation in a sentence. He, like Roy and Jack are consummate musicians who happen to express themselves on the drumset.

ps. i agree that people sleep on Lenny White.
 
D

drumfreak1987

Guest
jack dejohnette, jeff ballard, and keith carlock

there are some great mentions in the previous posts too, stellas and fellas. y'all check out billy martin, jerome dupree, and rich stizel!!!
 
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