Too old...?

lowdowner

Senior Member
So... I'm currently a bass player - gigging with a band and have a great time. But... for some of our tracks we could do with a drummer, and we don't currently have one. After thinking about it a lot I realise that I'd really like to play drums perhaps more than just as an occasional stand in.

I can't play a beat at the moment and I'm a relative late starter (46) - any advice? Am I too late to become good at this? Where do I get a kit from, are lessons worth it?

Help! :)
 

MaryO

Platinum Member
Never too old. I started at 44 not having a clue on how to even properly hold a stick. A year and a half later and I'm doing okay. You'll have an advantage being a bass player already. Go for it! Find a good teacher and have fun!

And welcome :)
 

larryz

Platinum Member
Hi. There must be something about being in your mid 40s and taking the leap into drumming world. I'd suggest your local Craigslist for a use drum set. Could go wrong with a Yamaha Stage Custom. I'd start there. For cymbals it's a bit tougher being a newbie and finding used cymbals. I'd just spend $450 and get a Zildjian A cymbal pack. That is, if you're rather serious. Have fun.
 

Art Hemming

Junior Member
I don't think that the notion of "too old" (or too young) apply to those artistic endeavours like music. If you feel like hitting a wooden barrel with a small wooden dowel is what you would like to do (I love it), go for it. The skills will come in time. There's quite a lot of people whom are self-taught, and quite a lot who got lessons. Depends on what you want to do.

Welcome to percussion!
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Sounds like you're in an outfit without drummer. But you need a beat.
Go for it. All you need is a snare, bass drum, hi hats and a ride cymbal, learn how to use it and you have 80% of drumming. There is so much on the net and DVD to learn quickly from now.
 

lowdowner

Senior Member
Hi. There must be something about being in your mid 40s and taking the leap into drumming world. (snip). Have fun.
Mid-life crisis perhaps? Realising that time is running out and not wanting to look back and regretting not doing those things you really wanted to do?
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Ahhh yes.Next comes the Harley chopper,tatoos and staying up late at night.

There's nothing wrong with taking up playing drums in your 40's.It's not too difficult learning simple beats at first.As a bass player you already understand time,so that's something you won't have to struggle with.It just takes time and as much practise as you're willing to put in.

Welcome to the forum,and the club.Cheers:)

Steve B
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Hey - thanks for all the comments/advice - friendly lot :)
Yes, the brotherhood on the forum is very friendly and full of seasoned players which gives very good advices :)

No, you're not too old and it's not too late (it's never wrong to make the right decision, lol)

Start with simple beats, find a good teacher (he'll put you in the right track) and you can find a good secondhand kit on e-bay or craig list.

But be careful... drumming is a very addictive instrument, once you've started it's like a drug, you can't give it up :)

Welcome to the best drum forum on the planet :)
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Hi. There must be something about being in your mid 40s and taking the leap into drumming world. I'd suggest your local Craigslist for a use drum set. Could go wrong with a Yamaha Stage Custom. I'd start there. For cymbals it's a bit tougher being a newbie and finding used cymbals. I'd just spend $450 and get a Zildjian A cymbal pack. That is, if you're rather serious. Have fun.

2 things stand out here - I think you mean to say 'Can't go wrong with Yamaha Stage Customs', and you have really good prices in PA - Zildjian A packs are usually $650 to $699 around here.

About age - IMO, as long as you can still fog a mirror, it's not too late to try taking up almost anything.
 
Yes, the brotherhood on the forum is very friendly and full of seasoned players which gives very good advices :)

No, you're not too old and it's not too late (it's never wrong to make the right decision, lol)

Start with simple beats, find a good teacher (he'll put you in the right track) and you can find a good secondhand kit on e-bay or craig list.

But be careful... drumming is a very addictive instrument, once you've started it's like a drug, you can't give it up :)

Welcome to the best drum forum on the planet :)
I am so glad to know Im not the only human being to- ow my ears are ringing- I should get better ear equipment- be addicted to drums!
 

groove1

Silver Member
Once you get going on the drums, try not to be overly critical of your bass player! Seriously,
this does happen when drummers switch to bass and vice versa. Have fun on the drums!
Never too late to get going...the fact you are a bass player already will help a lot.
 

Sopranos

Senior Member
Never too late (or too old)...

If you decide to give it a try, may I suggest:

www.mikeslesssons.com

for relatively cheap ($20/mo) lessons from a phenomenal quality teacher. I am not suggesting that this approach is better than 1 on 1 lessons in person with a professional teacher but you will gain quite a nice vocabulary of beats and fills as well as have your questions answered in his live online lessons. A GREAT deal of info for $20/month.

Good luck!
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I am 64, Will you still need me, will you still feed me, and have been playing for about 5 years, after a 32 year hiatus. I am so glad I started over and can say I am better now than then especially drum set. if you don't try you will never know. You don't have to go broke buying new stuff, as was mentioned try the used market. Best of luck.
 

con struct

Platinum Member
You're never too old until you're too old. I'm 59 and I'm just taking up painting, something that takes years to master, and I have those years.

So do you.
 

wombat

Senior Member
Never too old mate, I bought my first kit 2 years ago at 50, now 52 and quite happy I can hold a groove.... will never be a flat out double kick , crazy fill kind of player..... but dont care I always wanted to play and now live in a house where the neighbours are far enough away not to have complaints.

I actually found to my surprise because I didnt care about being cool, and being happy to learn different styles that when I "test" gear at a shop I get complimented on my tecnigue and theyre often surprised how long ive been at it for....... a lot to be said for an old head I think, and a willingness to learn and experiment.

This forum is great because your exposed to so many different opinions and styles...you get to appreciate theres many paths you can take and ways of playing...and its friendly ( and funny) as well.

Hope you love playing and enjoy being here as much as I am !!
 

slowrocker

Silver Member
I would definitely suggest getting a good teacher. You can learn on your own but with one on one instruction you just get more out of it. It will also help having someone identify your weaknesses and helping you when you struggle with things.
 

lowdowner

Senior Member
I would definitely suggest getting a good teacher. You can learn on your own but with one on one instruction you just get more out of it. It will also help having someone identify your weaknesses and helping you when you struggle with things.
I've already sent a few emails out to potential teachers locally so I'm on my way.. :)
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Never too old! I always tell students (and anybody willing to listen) that all it takes is the right amount of desire. Hell, you already know that since you already play an instrument, so what are you asking us for? Get on it!

From time to time I get hit with a bug to learn something completely new, and ever since I saw Tony Levin playing Chapman Stick back in 1979, I've always wanted to learn how to play one. Unfortunately, it's not an instrument that you can find at any ol' music store so for the last 33 years, I've dreamed about it.

That would be an interesting thread: How do you temper your desire to learn something completely new? How does the 'want' get translated into 'doing'? How long do you plug away with no good results? Hmm....
 
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