Tony Williams

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Spurred on by the gear thread discussion that led to talking about steel pan, I went and checked out some Othello Molineaux, which led me to a recommended album The Trio with Tommy Flannagan, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, recorded in 83'. Interesting, I dont think Ive heard much from this period from Tony.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHSWyy_9U7k
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
That is an interesting record-- I've never seen it before, ever. I really used to massacre the cutout bins for records with Tony on them, too. I'll be listening to that a lot this week.

If anyone is confused by his playing in the 60s, check out this record with Charles Lloyd. He does all the stuff he did with Miles, but at more moderate tempos, and a more restrained context, so you can hear what he's doing more clearly.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Well looks like we scratched each others backs on this one. The Charles Lloyd action is new to me! Very interesting to hear his stuff in a mellower tone/vibe. Keep the Tony coming...
 
D

drumming sort of person

Guest
I've got both of those records. Great stuff. The Flanagan record has Tony playing some great trading solos too.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
If anyone is confused by his playing in the 60s, check out this record with Charles Lloyd. He does all the stuff he did with Miles, but at more moderate tempos, and a more restrained context, so you can hear what he's doing more clearly.
I'd heard the Flanagan record before, but I had no idea this Lloyd record existed. I'm digging it right now!

I wouldn't go so far as to call myself a Tony completist, but I'm pretty close to one. For me to find out a record he made during the mid-60s had completely escaped me until now is pretty shocking in the best way possible. Thanks!

This is pre-hi-hats-on-all-fours. That seems to have started with Miles Smiles in 1966.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Okay, I'm already in love with this Charles Lloyd record. Tony sounds amazing.

I love this period of Tony. His comping is so hip, so unpredictable. I get why his fusion period with the big drum set and the black-dot heads is so influential, but for me, this is THE Tony period. Left foot was there for three-voice comping, the ride cymbal beat had those crazy turnarounds with five-note groupings, even at screaming tempos, the drum sound with that wide-open 18" bass drum, THAT RIDE CYMBAL. Nobody ever sounded like this, before or since.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Who'da thunk in 2018 we'd be finding new Elvin and Tony (to my ears anyway) to listen to. Blessings, blessings
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Spurred on by the gear thread discussion that led to talking about steel pan, I went and checked out some Othello Molineaux, which led me to a recommended album The Trio with Tommy Flannagan, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, recorded in 83'. Interesting, I dont think Ive heard much from this period from Tony.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHSWyy_9U7k
Nice find!
If you are interested, some other steel pan soloists of note I would suggest checking out are:

THE LEGENDS
-Len "Boogsie" Sharpe (a veritable prodigy of the instrument, often described as the "Mozart of pan")
-Robbie Greenidge (Jimmy Buffett's resident pan player and my personal favorite soloist)
-Andy Narrell (big time jazz steel pan player and composer)
-Ken "Professor" Philmore (He used to play with the Duke Ellington Orchestra; sadly, we lost him this past weekend due to injuries from an automobile accident)

THE NEW CATS
-Liam Teague (a violinist-turned-pan player who displays an absurd level of speed and dexterity in his playing)
-Victor Provost (a very gifted bebop style soloist and composer)
-Johnathan Scales (he's more on the trippy fusion side; gaining popularity in jam band circles here in the US)
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Nice find!
If you are interested, some other steel pan soloists of note I would suggest checking out are:

THE LEGENDS
-Len "Boogsie" Sharpe (a veritable prodigy of the instrument, often described as the "Mozart of pan")
-Robbie Greenidge (Jimmy Buffett's resident pan player and my personal favorite soloist)
-Andy Narrell (big time jazz steel pan player and composer)
-Ken "Professor" Philmore (He used to play with the Duke Ellington Orchestra; sadly, we lost him this past weekend due to injuries from an automobile accident)

THE NEW CATS
-Liam Teague (a violinist-turned-pan player who displays an absurd level of speed and dexterity in his playing)
-Victor Provost (a very gifted bebop style soloist and composer)
-Johnathan Scales (he's more on the trippy fusion side; gaining popularity in jam band circles here in the US)
Awesome, thanks again Mustion!
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
Spurred on by the gear thread discussion that led to talking about steel pan, I went and checked out some Othello Molineaux, which led me to a recommended album The Trio with Tommy Flannagan, Ron Carter and Tony Williams, recorded in 83'. Interesting, I dont think Ive heard much from this period from Tony.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHSWyy_9U7k
That is an interesting record-- I've never seen it before, ever. I really used to massacre the cutout bins for records with Tony on them, too. I'll be listening to that a lot this week.

If anyone is confused by his playing in the 60s, check out this record with Charles Lloyd. He does all the stuff he did with Miles, but at more moderate tempos, and a more restrained context, so you can hear what he's doing more clearly.
Great find for me as well, thank you both.

The clarity of Tony's playing in both contexts really sheds yet more light on the uniqueness of his touch.

I am still having trouble discerning the bass drum notes at times, that is going to take some more listening and concentration.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Great find for me as well, thank you both.

The clarity of Tony's playing in both contexts really sheds yet more light on the uniqueness of his touch.

I am still having trouble discerning the bass drum notes at times, that is going to take some more listening and concentration.
Bass drum is super clear on the Trio album, and almost sounded out of place in the context of the recording based on the system I listened to it on. Im hoping a better system will maybe smooth that out. But not only could I clearly hear the bass drum, but it sounded strange to my ears. Weirded me out. Anyway, glad your enjoying...threw on Emergency today and reminded myself, I shouldnt sleep on the next phase of Tonys playing. Love that period too. Where are you going, the sea urchin song and all that great stuff. Funny as I drove in to work today listening to Emergency, I noticed how nice his bass drum work was.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Bass drum is super clear on the Trio album, and almost sounded out of place in the context of the recording based on the system I listened to it on. Im hoping a better system will maybe smooth that out. But not only could I clearly hear the bass drum, but it sounded strange to my ears. Weirded me out. Anyway, glad your enjoying...threw on Emergency today and reminded myself, I shouldnt sleep on the next phase of Tonys playing. Love that period too. Where are you going, the sea urchin song and all that great stuff. Funny as I drove in to work today listening to Emergency, I noticed how nice his bass drum work was.
Tony used that 24" bass drum even playing bebop later in his career. It is almost shocking to hear that drum sound in that style of music. I love everything Tony did, but I never really warmed up to that bass drum sound in that context.

Edit: I just listened to Master Trio and I was confusing it with another record. Tony's bass drum sound on this doesn't sound that radical to me. His snare definitely has that later-period sound, though. The wires sound like they're hanging off the bottom of the drum.
 
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J-Boogie

Gold Member
Man just been digging the hell out of Tony lately. Ive been especially loving his interaction with Bobby Hutcherson. Right now diggin on Jackie McLean One Step Beyond, but yesterdays ride to work was all Grachan Moncur The Coaster. That Evolution album took me a minute to love but is now one of my favorites. It often seems the albums that are the most difficult to get, are the ones with the most staying power.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
Man just been digging the hell out of Tony lately. Ive been especially loving his interaction with Bobby Hutcherson. Right now diggin on Jackie McLean One Step Beyond, but yesterdays ride to work was all Grachan Moncur The Coaster. That Evolution album took me a minute to love but is now one of my favorites. It often seems the albums that are the most difficult to get, are the ones with the most staying power.
I'm glad you dig Evolution. It kind of gets lost in the shuffle of all those great Blue Notes from 1964 and 1965. It's a fantastic record.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Water Babies has been one of my favorite records for a long time. Basically all stuff that didn't make it onto Filles de Kilimanjaro. Everything's kind of unfinished, which is what's cool about it.
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Water Babies...another new adventure, yes!!!

As I was listening to One Step Beyond Jackie McLean on you tube, one of the commenters mentioned it was Tony’s first recording and he was 17. True?

Was showing friend at work my opinion of the next wave of genius and was showing him some Chris Dave and it was all Nefertiti covers and Miles/Tony vamps lol. Maybe I’m old school but the new school needs to absorb the old school to indeed be new school of note, I feel Dave has done that.

Side note, found some old cd’s yesterday and there was 2 Arcana cds, gotta toss them in again, different, but Tony power and joy
 

J-Boogie

Gold Member
Just got Filles De Kilimanjaro wow this is a different direction, different feel. Feel tension or something. Looking forward to checking more only heard a bit. Water Babies next...
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
Water Babies...another new adventure, yes!!!

As I was listening to One Step Beyond Jackie McLean on you tube, one of the commenters mentioned it was Tony’s first recording and he was 17. True?

Was showing friend at work my opinion of the next wave of genius and was showing him some Chris Dave and it was all Nefertiti covers and Miles/Tony vamps lol. Maybe I’m old school but the new school needs to absorb the old school to indeed be new school of note, I feel Dave has done that.

Side note, found some old cd’s yesterday and there was 2 Arcana cds, gotta toss them in again, different, but Tony power and joy
pretty sure Vertigo was his first recording in June of '62 when he would have been 16

also a Jackie record ... check that one out

Tony splits time with Billy Higgins on that record

I think Tony is on the first 5 if I remember correctly
 

fabiodrummy

Junior Member
… MAX ROACH.dr ,TONY WILLIAMS.dr ,GINGER BAKER.dr..
''PERCUSSION SUMMIT'' & M'.Boom Re Percussion Ensamble. Live in Verona ,Italy ,1995. t.1h,32. Well , once again another 'RARE'' live concert with THREE great giants of the 'Drums History'.. First time all together only for this Live Jazz Festival in the ''Arena of Verona''. Max Roach is the Hard+Bop drumming style, Tony Williams is for the New-Modern Hard Bopping/Rocking drumming style, and Ginger Baker for the Rock+Blues Beat drumming style.,-


, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgwBnHWA7Bc
 
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