Tommy Igoe Funk groove help

matthew

Senior Member
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/tommyigoe67funkgroove.html

wat is happening at 2:04 to about 2:05...

i have listened a heap of times and my theory is pretty good but I can't work this out. Maybe its the 4 hours sleep... can you help, this sounds great and I think it is something I should add to my playing.

I tried working it out like this

bsbb sbbs bbsb bsbb
bc- s-b- s-b- s-b-

where s = horn stabs/band hits,
b= basic 16th note placemarker
- = like b but not played
c = crash

at first I thought played a half swung/half straight groove displaced onto the stabs which come evenly once they start. but that didn't add up.

Then I thought it was simply displaced a double time beat on the stabs...

now I'm thinking its in something like subdivisions of 5 starting on 2 or something haha

im over thinking now... its probably simple.... any help?
 

Thaard

Platinum Member
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/tommyigoe67funkgroove.html

wat is happening at 2:04 to about 2:05...

i have listened a heap of times and my theory is pretty good but I can't work this out. Maybe its the 4 hours sleep... can you help, this sounds great and I think it is something I should add to my playing.

I tried working it out like this

bsbb sbbs bbsb bsbb
bc- s-b- s-b- s-b-

where s = horn stabs/band hits,
b= basic 16th note placemarker
- = like b but not played
c = crash

at first I thought played a half swung/half straight groove displaced onto the stabs which come evenly once they start. but that didn't add up.

Then I thought it was simply displaced a double time beat on the stabs...

now I'm thinking its in something like subdivisions of 5 starting on 2 or something haha

im over thinking now... its probably simple.... any help?
Isnt it just metric modulation or something? Playing 4/4 only abit different and faster.
 
http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/tommyigoe67funkgroove.html

wat is happening at 2:04 to about 2:05...

i have listened a heap of times and my theory is pretty good but I can't work this out. Maybe its the 4 hours sleep... can you help, this sounds great and I think it is something I should add to my playing.

I tried working it out like this

bsbb sbbs bbsb bsbb
bc- s-b- s-b- s-b-

where s = horn stabs/band hits,
b= basic 16th note placemarker
- = like b but not played
c = crash

at first I thought played a half swung/half straight groove displaced onto the stabs which come evenly once they start. but that didn't add up.

Then I thought it was simply displaced a double time beat on the stabs...

now I'm thinking its in something like subdivisions of 5 starting on 2 or something haha

im over thinking now... its probably simple.... any help?

yeah man, that is smokin...

it's hard to describe what he's doing in text but here it is:

it's basically taking the band figure which starts on the "e" of 1 (and continues in dotted eighths) and then superimposing a basic rock beat over the top of it. So the FIGURE becomes the primary subdivision for the rock beat (hear how the snare plays the "back beat" every other hit?) and it all magically comes out on "1" for the unison hit.
 

double_G

Silver Member
it's definitely metric modulation. when you do a hemiola kick phrase over straight 8ths or 16th, its a perfect time to throw this in. or anytime your subdivide 16ths into 3s, etc.

just think of those kicks as "new" downbeats...check how Tommy implies a shuffle w/ BD on 1st kick, snare on 2nd kick, BD, etc. then snaps back to the right meter. this one is relatively easy once you feel the meter "turnaround". Vinnie & Weckl have done this a lot.

one way to lear is to put on a click & just do those bo-diddley kicks over & over then try implying that new time over a few of them as a shuffle feel.
 

matthew

Senior Member
Thanks guys. It's clear now. :):)

I did a search and found this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiola

so technically its not a hemiola because it is not in 3/4 but I understand what you mean and I will probably call 3 over 4 and 4 over 3 patterns hemiola now myself (if it ever comes up).

im going to try this stuff now!
 
Thanks guys. It's clear now. :):)

I did a search and found this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemiola

so technically its not a hemiola because it is not in 3/4 but I understand what you mean and I will probably call 3 over 4 and 4 over 3 patterns hemiola now myself (if it ever comes up).

im going to try this stuff now!
The term "hemiloa" has become a catch-all term for a "syncopated figure that repeats itself over the primary downbeat". Originally, it was a classical term (as all these terms are by the way), that strictly adhered to a 2/3 ratio. Now, people use it in the context discussed here.
 
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