To your Surprise

timmdrum

Silver Member
his left hand playing a 3-2 clave, against his right hand playing a 3-2 clave
@bermuda , I was a bit confused by this, until later in your post, you said:
I never did use a 2-3 vs 3-2 clave
...so I presume the first quote is a typo. So I began thinking about the whole post, using this 2nd quote as the basis (left hand 2-3, right hand 3-2), and was thinking that this is one of those impossible things that I'd never figure out until woodshedding it for several hours a day for a week or two. But after pondering it for a couple of minutes, I think I've realized that, just as you said, it's pretty simple! But I want to run it by you: is the complete rhythm simply "1 &a2 & 3 &a4 &" (or "1 2&3 4, 1 2&3 4" at faster tempos) and alternating every stroke?
 
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SharkSandwich

Junior Member
Just thought of one. Having chased down my all time favorite wood snare, Tama Starphonic Bubinga, My AHA moment was realizing I don't really seem to like wood snares! :eek: The snare sounds I've been tracking down have always ended up most satisfying in metal snares!
Same!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Platinum Member
You mean the drummin

The final frontier could be 'getting a non-baffling username'? 😉

heres the skinny:

str8edge = Straight Edge - the culture of non drinking/smoking/drug using etc that was made "popular" by Minor Threat
tnr = tenor (like quads in marching band)
drmr = drummer

so Straight Edge tenor drummer

the x's on either side is a hardcore/punk thing
 

Yamaha Rider

Gold Member
heres the skinny:

str8edge = Straight Edge - the culture of non drinking/smoking/drug using etc that was made "popular" by Minor Threat
tnr = tenor (like quads in marching band)
drmr = drummer

so Straight Edge tenor drummer

the x's on either side is a hardcore/punk thing
Decoded! 😁
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Platinum Member

ricky

Senior Member
Since you have been drumming, what is the one thing you have learned that was the Light Bulb, surprise, that made you say, Oh Wow.

That tension was the enemy. I am completely unschooled and don't really consider my self a drummer...so it took a long time to realize that my form was awful and wrong and full of tension (to the point I was getting sore knees, etc). Once I realized that building the muscles but then playing with no tension was the way to go, I improved a lot.

No tension is the key to all instruments and singing, and everything, really.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Ode to @beyondbetrayal:

Prior I was a swivel footed fast son of a gun, I play a lot of double kick ‘grooves’ that way. Can even swivel fast with left foot almost the same speed

However when doing single stroke runs with swivel, I was often loosing consistency and was obviously dragging.

Looking at beyond’s heel toe technique vids about 6-9 months ago, and started working on this heavily.
I was soon able to do double stroke runs with my feet.

So my light went off one night. I was playing a song that needed a consistent double, I tried with just my right - heel toe and the notes were almost there.

In short when I want to double kick groove I use swivel for control.
When I need to flat out run, it’s heel toe, and it works for me!
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
^ great point. Having been forced into low volume drumming, I could actually hear myself. It was eye opening and has made a great impact on how I play now. It’s so easy to overplay when you can’t really hear anything amidst the chaos!
 

iCe

Silver Member
A couple of things come to mind. The first is also recording myself during rehearsals. We don't play with a metronome or click track, but sometimes i think/feel 'man that was horrible'. Looking the video back most of the time there wasn't anything audible or wrong. Also when playing live i somethings think 'auch that was one super loud rimshot' only to listen back and realise that i wasn't that loud.

The other thing is... keeping time with my left foot on the hi-hat when playing the ride/crashes/doing a fill etc. Really improved my timing and tightness of playing.
 
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petrez

Senior Member
I guess finding my "right" drumkit setup was sort of an eye opener, finally having the money to get a big double bass setup that I always wanted (but never tried so I was not sure I could play on it well) and even though it's a long time ago now, I remember how it just all felt right pretty much from the moment I got it and it's pretty much the same setup I play today. So that and getting into double bass playing.

Also the moment I let go of comparing myself to other drummers, feeling inadequate. At least I rarely do nowadays compared to before, I realised at a point that it was only destructive, as long as my band sounds good and I do my best, being myself and putting my signature on my drumming sort to say, negative comments don't really affect me anymore.
 

moxman

Silver Member
I can only think of one thing.. all the rest are just part of a journey and peeling the onion.

When I first started playing.. the first lesson my teacher showed me was a double stroke roll.. starting real slow and progressing until it was a blinding speed down to a buzz roll - and then slowing it back down. The hair on my head flew backwards! Wow..

Funny story.. later while in the high school orchestra visiting local elementary schools.. the conductor was explaining the instruments to the students and then asked if I could demonstrate something on the snare drum... so I did the double stroke roll trick from slow to fast and back down.
Fast forward about 30 years.. and I was backstage at a big jazz festival talking to some musician friends.. and a guy comes up to me and says he remembers me - from that elementary school performance - and that it inspired him to take up drums!
It turned out - he is a world class jazz drummer who was playing the festival. I looked him up and he had a long star studded resume - and also teaches at Berkely among other things. I have no idea how he remembered my name or even recognized me - but small world indeed!
So ya - the double stroke roll!
 
the space between the notes are just as important as the notes themselves and oh wow I bought another snare
 
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