Tips for a begginner

pitythefool

Junior Member
I would say that becoming familiar with the acoustics in which you hit the different parts of your drum set is important for understanding the output of the music you play. Does that make sense? Like, you don't always have to mash your drumset like it owes you money. There are acoustic dynamics to your instrument. It's going to produce the same value of your hits you give. I would say that becoming cognizant of assigning equal value to your hits is important in producing quality music. I think this is what really helps accentuate accents. Incidentally, I've found that experimenting with this frame of mind approaching my instrument means the difference between neighbors being cool with me playing versus not.
Also, I have also been trying to play while verbally keeping time along to a metronome. It's incredible what it has done to my playing whenever I just wing it and jam out. I practice at 95 bpm and use a function on my metronome where it increases one bpm per 30 measures. By the time I get to about 120-140 bpm I'm ingrained with the timing. If you have any troube keeping time with other musicians I would argue that this can help you. Good luck!
 
I've been playing for almost 3 years (I think?) on an electronic drum kit (Roland HD-1 I KNOW IT SUCKS T_T) I'm self taught because I've never had money for lessons, which sucks but wtv. I never really forced myself to learn the basics, I just sat and played whatever I wanted. I've come to a point where I want to be better, but I don't know where to start. I had a "trial" lesson in a music school and the teacher said I had the correct posture and I knew how to correctly hold the drum sticks and stuff.
What I really want help with is: What should I practice more? Double strokes, paradiddles and rudiments? Should I also learn how to read tabs and stuff? What books can I buy or download to help me, since I can't really have a teacher?

Thank you.
Cool username btw. I'm surprised nobody's taken that one already.
 
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