Time signature explanation?

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I just read the top number. The song is in 7. Or, the song is in 5. Oh the song is in 9? OK. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Is that wrong?
 
I just read the top number. The song is in 7. Or, the song is in 5. Oh the song is in 9? OK. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Is that wrong?
Absolutely right on IMHO. kinda slang amongst musicians but it works and as long as you have the count you should be good if you understand the rest or at least have a feel for it. After all, it's all feel anyways. Am I right :) This is a great point by the by. Was it brought up earlier?? I get forgetful in my old age. Beats per measure and your in.
 
This is a great example/illustration.

I'll use it to reiterate what I was saying about viewing time sigs as fractions in relation to a standard measure of 4/4.

We can view this as one long measure of 7/4, or as alternating measures of 4/4 and 3/4.

Since it has 7 (top number) 1/4 notes (bottom number), it also has 14 1/8th notes (we could call it a measure of 14/8, though we simplify and call it 7/4 to show the lowest common denominator of the pulse). If we added two more 1/8 notes we would have 16 1/8th notes...16/8...or 8/4... or as we all know it --> TWO measures of 4/4.

However if we subtract just one 1/8th note from this example of 7/4, we would have a measure of 13/8. In a measure of 13/8 there is no longer a pulse of 1/4 notes that repeats every measure. The lowest common denominator pulse is 1/8 notes.

So to tie it in to what others have said about just counting the top number, if you are playing 7/4 you are counting SEVEN 1/4 notes. If you are playing 13/8 you are counting THIRTEEN 1/8 notes (this does NOT mean counting 1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+). 13/8 is like counting SIX and a HALF 1/4 notes (counting 1+2+3+4+5+6+7).

Its math meets drumming.
 
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