This LIttle Tyros Piss Me Off!

jazzerooty

Junior Member
I've been in this racket since the late 60s. Had a good, professional run and still lead a good bebop group. I still work hard at the craft. But the kids that get posted on my FB page can be unbelievable good players. They post these wunderkind nearly every day. Yesterday someone sent a vid of a 13-year old, playing to a recording of big band bebop, at metronome 320. And the kid is making all the breaks, etc. His parents must've built the studio he was playing in. Soundproofed. Some rich brats are getting the jump, damn it! You Tube has turned into the best drum instructor on the planet. Let's get these punks! (Of course, I am not serious here. It's amazing what these kids can do. But they do make me feel ready for the damned boneyard).
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Thankfully, being a musician is about a lot more than making it through one song at a time, probably with no flavor of your own, on youtube.

The rich brats had a leg up in the old days , too. btw

There are issues with the way things have turned, but that's not the fault of the kids.
 

ToneT

Well-known member
Don't sweat it, man!
Just keep doing what you're doing and be the best that YOU can be!

I'm waiting for the day when someone comes along who plays single strokes so quickly that we no longer hear the individual notes!
I think Thomas Lang mentioned this; "Someone who comes along and just creates Sustain!"

Look, drumming has evolved, drummers are evolving forward. It wont stop.
Be proud that you put in the time to reach your present ability, regardless of the rich neighbors son who has more than we had at his age.
We are all on our own drumming journey, and rightly so!
We can all push ourselves to another level if we want it.

Furthermore, Drumming is a life-time endeavor, a labor of love that each and every one of us is blessed to live with.

Cheers to all, and Happy Holidays!
Be strong!
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Always the question if the great player today will be playing tomorrow.

Persistence is much harder to learn than bepop at 320

Shoot a kind eye at the folks you see as they may not be getting the care they need to endure.

...and in the modern world, be aware of deep (and sometimes, not so deep) fakes...is that kid really doing that?...the only way to really tell..see them live.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I know how you feel. I'm 71 years old and I have been playing the drums since just after I learned how to walk. The only thing that bothers me a little is that there are so many good drummers now a days. I'm happy about that and I'm sad about that.
I currently play with a band where the guitar players have a rather poor sense of time. I manage to keep the band together and sounding good for four hours at live gigs. I'd like to see any 13 year old drummer do that.

.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
One thing I see is:
When I saw/wanted my first guitar, I was 13. Parents said: So when do you start your new job?
My niece bought her son (13) a brand new Les Paul custom.

I used to play (guitar) all day every day...Til things started costing ME money.

Life began.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I like to see young people excel and they actually inspire me to want to keep up and work on my game. I use to be pretty good water skiing but by todays standards I am a wimp. Skate boarding too-I made my first one-it was a craze a friend of my brother brought home from Miami in early 60s. Everybody was taking their skates and converting them into skate boards. Unbelievable skate boarders now. Inspiring really. I've seen unbelievable drummers my whole life-I really don't think I've seen the drastic improvements like I have in those two particular sports. I've seen bad ass double bass when I was a lil kid. I've mentioned a scene in a movie from late 60-early70s that has this dude that was the fastest player I've ever seen. Just a blur. I've looked and looked for the movie-but nothin'. But I think in the "race of life" we carry a baton until we pass it off to the next. If the person you hand it to is faster/better-all the better. There is a biblical phrase too "As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another".
 
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ToneT

Well-known member
I know how you feel. I'm 71 years old and I have been playing the drums since just after I learned how to walk. The only thing that bothers me a little is that there are so many good drummers now a days. I'm happy about that and I'm sad about that.
I currently play with a band where the guitar players have a rather poor sense of time. I manage to keep the band together and sounding good for four hours at live gigs. I'd like to see any 13 year old drummer do that.

.
"guitar players have a rather poor sense of time."
I couldn't have said it better!
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
I don't even watch 'em. I know those whiz kids are out there but I have zero interest in them.

Keith Carlock and Gavin Harrison inspire me. Some 7 year old wunderkid from the Bronx? Not so much. :rolleyes:
 
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Sonorfan

Well-known member
Don't sweat it, man!
Just keep doing what you're doing and be the best that YOU can be!

I'm waiting for the day when someone comes along who plays single strokes so quickly that we no longer hear the individual notes!
I think Thomas Lang mentioned this; "Someone who comes along and just creates Sustain!"

Look, drumming has evolved, drummers are evolving forward. It wont stop.
Be proud that you put in the time to reach your present ability, regardless of the rich neighbors son who has more than we had at his age.
We are all on our own drumming journey, and rightly so!
We can all push ourselves to another level if we want it.

Furthermore, Drumming is a life-time endeavor, a labor of love that each and every one of us is blessed to live with.

Cheers to all, and Happy Holidays!
Be strong!
You hit the nail on the head. I’m 80 and Osteo has slowed me down so I don’t have the wrist flexabilty I once had. So, I’ve quit trying to do what I can’t and concentrate on what I can still do. I was, pre Covid playing with some highly skilled Jazz musicians and by concentrating on what worked and not trying to overplay kept me “in the loop and in the group” But saying that, during the Covid shutdown I have been relentless on YouTube as regards watching my fav drummers and tutorials and working an hour per day. to canned no drums, music tracks. I’m pleased to say that some of the techniques I had lost are returning somewhat. So I’m happy where things are going. And I never was going to be exceptional anyway but If can be a decent drummer now that sets and stays in time, gets to do fills and mini breaks and keeps the other musicians happy, then I’m a happy camper.
Kudos to those great young drummers.
 

Durbs

Senior Member
In fairness, it's not just drumming... My other interest is rock climbing, and you have the same situation where "kids" (which I define as anyone under 21...) are climbing routes which were bleeding edge of difficulty back in the 80s and 90s.

The ceiling keeps getting raised for pretty much anything; there's more information out there - in terms of technique, learning methods, resources available. Even for myself, turning 40 next year and went to music college when I was 20, I've actually learnt more technique this year during lockdown from dedicated practice, inspired by the glut of material on YouTube and the sudden increase in amount of time I'm spending at home so I can jump on the kit everyday - which is pretty much what a "kid" has too.

As others have mentioned, what you can't teach is the "art" part, so it's REALLY impressive when you get these wonder-kids who not only have the technical chops, but the musicality to use them (or not).
JD Beck being a good example, blistering technique, but also he knows to leave gaps and there's some good musicality there too - even though I don't really care for that type of music (d'n'b jazz crossover?).
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
But if that "kid" were your child or grandchild just think how proud you would be of their achievements. When I started teaching it didn't take me long to get vested in treating them as if they were my own. (I guess the Mr Mom stint gave me some nurturing skills I never had before) If they failed I felt it my failure and their successes I share and think that maybe I had something to do with it. But not all kids are doing great-just look at drop out rates in high school and college. They need help and I can empathize with their struggles.
 

prokofi5

Junior Member
My other interest is rock climbing, and you have the same situation where "kids" (which I define as anyone under 21...) are climbing routes which were bleeding edge of difficulty back in the 80s and 90s.
I hear you. I was so stoked when I completed my first lead climb, but while we were packing up our gear a kid put a rope in his teeth, free soloed the route, rapelled down, and walked away, lol.
There's always going to be someone better at everything. A little competition is probably good to help us push ourselves, but there's something wrong if it takes the fun out of it. I play music because I enjoy learning, it's therapeutic, and I like to communicate with the people I'm playing with or the people listening. But, I have the luxury of knowing I'll never be counting on my drumming paying my rent so I might be in a different position than the op or others here.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
When you already know everyone is better than you, it's not so hard to watch those videos. I do get where you're coming from though, it gets exhausting seeing 10 year olds drum circles around you.

The world is losing Jedi, everyone wants fame and fortune and adventure these days.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
I'm more on the bummed side... since all the school lockout stuff started I have put a keyboard at my mom's house, offered up bongos,a guitar and bass, tuner, violin and offered my niece 100 dollars towards a CL Drum set for her son and almost nobody is taking me up on it.
Just gave my boss my stock pearl bass pedal for her grandson yesterday.
 
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