Thinking about getting some Ludwig Classics.

Road Bull

Silver Member
So I have started playing again after a bit of a hiatus from being able to play drums. I now share a rehearsal space and can be loud again. I have been eyeing some Ludwig Maple Classics here and there. I currently have some 1990s era birch Tama Grandstars. I do love these drums as they sound very full and open with lots of projection.

The main reason that I am thinking about getting a second kit is that the Grandstars have a lot of sentimental value to me being the first really nice kit that I bought back when I was in high school. They still look great and sound fantastic. But this is a set that I would like to hold on to and not take any more wear and tear than necessary. I had a cheaper Ludwig rocker set with some sort of composite shells as my first set. I remember having a hard time with some of the hardware that didn't seem as though a lot of thought went into it. But now I am taking a closer look again.

I am looking at Ludwig Classic Maple in something like 13, 16, and 22/24 configuration.

How would you characterize the differences that I should expect going from birch to maple? Also, I have always played 22" X 16" bass drums. I am wondering if I should try out a 24", and if so, what depth. I would not want to go any deeper than 16" as I feel it would feel a little too boomy. I also hear that the rebound characteristics can change quite a bit depending on the depth of your bass drum.

I like many types of music, but mostly enjoy playing heavy stuff like Melvins, High on Fire, etc. etc. But I also like varying dynamics. I have to say the Ludwig MCs look pretty sharp, but I have not had a chance to play any and have been limited in hearing what is available on youtube.

Thanks for reading. Any input is appreciated.
 

Axe

Senior Member
Great choice!

I'm going to be ordering a kit soon myself, and I'm leaning towards a 14x24. I have a 6 ply maple set from 85 with that size, and it just kills. On the other hand, if I decide to do something a little different I may go with a 14x22.
 

Bonzobilly

Senior Member
I too went from birch to a classic maple. I had a 90's premier Genista that was great. Had it for 17 years and a time for change was at hand. Love my classic maples. They sound as you would comparably expect. Lower fundamental. Loud, though not as loud as oak. Biggest thing for me was kick drum head selection. Both kicks are/were 18x24. On the Genista I had an emad2 that sounded great. Unfortunately, when placed on the Ludwig, it totally killed the ludwigs projection. Too much dampening for sure. Slapped on a powerstroke 3 and it woke up and then some.
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
Right on. I think I need to find some different size bass drums to play to get a feel for how they sound and react to being kicked. I am also wondering about rack tom depth. The 13 X 9" may lend itself to a more comfortable placement options. I have always used a more standard rock tom depth. I want to be able to mount the tom via snare stand as well as bass tom mount. Either way, it seems nicer to have a little shallower depth. I am not too sure how much difference that depth will have on sound and projection though.

I im also kicking around the idea of going a stain instead of a wrap. I like the look of a clear maple finish. to me it would seem like they hide a scratch better than a wrap. has anyone gone from a rap to a stain and liked it a lot better?
 

Bonzobilly

Senior Member
If it helps, I use a 11x13 rack tom on a snare stand without any issues. In fact, I love it. When I throw up my other rack tom it takes a lot of time for readjustment. I just love the 1 up 2 down setup. As far as the projection difference, my 11 x 13 projects much more than a 9 x13 but you must hit it with a good amount of gusto. If you want more ability for articulation, stay with the 9x13. Just my .02
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
If it helps, I use a 11x13 rack tom on a snare stand without any issues. In fact, I love it. When I throw up my other rack tom it takes a lot of time for readjustment. I just love the 1 up 2 down setup. As far as the projection difference, my 11 x 13 projects much more than a 9 x13 but you must hit it with a good amount of gusto. If you want more ability for articulation, stay with the 9x13. Just my .02
Cool. Thanks for the information. the last time I purchase take it was over 20 years ago and I bought them because I thought they looked pretty cool and some of my favorite drummers use them. I did luck out in that respect as far as sound goes. So this time around I am using a little bit more research and finding out what works for other people.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I have some Ludwigs from the early 80s. 16x26, 9x13, 16x16, and 16x18 with a same-era 6.5 Supraphonic. I love them. There's something about those thinner maple shells that just make them louder than my Tamas (I also have older 80s Granstars I found for $300 last summer). I'd get a 14x26 bass drum. I love the sound!
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
I have some Ludwigs from the early 80s. 16x26, 9x13, 16x16, and 16x18 with a same-era 6.5 Supraphonic. I love them. There's something about those thinner maple shells that just make them louder than my Tamas (I also have older 80s Granstars I found for $300 last summer). I'd get a 14x26 bass drum. I love the sound!

Interesting. You got a really sweet deal on your Tamas. I would have to listen to a 26" before I committed to a kick that big. Keep in mind I have only had 22" kicks thus far. I do play a fair amount of double bass with a double pedal pedal. What do you feel you gain with larger bass drums? I kind of like the idea of a 24", but I could easily stick with 22".
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Interesting. You got a really sweet deal on your Tamas. I would have to listen to a 26" before I committed to a kick that big. Keep in mind I have only had 22" kicks thus far. I do play a fair amount of double bass with a double pedal pedal. What do you feel you gain with larger bass drums? I kind of like the idea of a 24", but I could easily stick with 22".
Well, I must've owned all sizes through my lifetime and I really just wanted the ultimate bottom end (like Buddy, Bonham, and even J.R. Robinson who was playing a 26" back in his early days). And the cool thing I'm discovering is my 26 doesn't have to be so slack-tuned to get that big bottom tone. It's actually tuned a bit up so it feels good and when I play it soft, there's still tone to it. On a 22, with it being "just above wrinkling" when I played it softly, it would just sound like a 'flap' with no tone at all. Not true all the time, but most of the time for me.

I can't go bigger (I'm not tall enough) and really, a 24" should've been sufficient considering my height. But I had to try the 26 at least once in my life. And it's working out really well for everything. 26 was actually the size alot of guys were using. Appice, Cozy Powell, Ian Paice, those guys were using 26, which actually influenced Bonham to use a 26.

My Granstars were a good deal, but there was damage. I had to re-glue a bass drum hoop, and some of the candy apple red finish was scratched on the bass drum, so it definitely wasn't pristine. But its a nice players kit that I could throw in the truck and go do a gig with. I even keep the violently dangerous T-rods on the bass drum for good measure!
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
So I listened to a few 24" kicks. I really like the sound. The only thing I am a little apprehensive about its tom placement. I was originally interested in having the option to mount the tom (s) on a bass drum mount, or a separate stand. But the additional height might restrict tom placement.

Do any of you use a bass tom mount on your 24" bass drums? Or have you just adapted to using a separate stand/mount?
 

ohiodrummer1964

Senior Member
Well, I must've owned all sizes through my lifetime and I really just wanted the ultimate bottom end (like Buddy, Bonham, and even J.R. Robinson who was playing a 26" back in his early days). And the cool thing I'm discovering is my 26 doesn't have to be so slack-tuned to get that big bottom tone. It's actually tuned a bit up so it feels good and when I play it soft, there's still tone to it. On a 22, with it being "just above wrinkling" when I played it softly, it would just sound like a 'flap' with no tone at all. Not true all the time, but most of the time for me.

I can't go bigger (I'm not tall enough) and really, a 24" should've been sufficient considering my height. But I had to try the 26 at least once in my life. And it's working out really well for everything. 26 was actually the size alot of guys were using. Appice, Cozy Powell, Ian Paice, those guys were using 26, which actually influenced Bonham to use a 26.

My Granstars were a good deal, but there was damage. I had to re-glue a bass drum hoop, and some of the candy apple red finish was scratched on the bass drum, so it definitely wasn't pristine. But its a nice players kit that I could throw in the truck and go do a gig with. I even keep the violently dangerous T-rods on the bass drum for good measure!
Throw in Aynsley Dunbar and Joey Kramer and you've just named all my favorite drummers. Gotta love 1970's hard rock. And Ludwig drums.
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Throw in Aynsley Dunbar and Joey Kramer and you've just named all my favorite drummers. Gotta love 1970's hard rock. And Ludwig drums.
That's right. I remember them too! Although I recall Aynsley was using 20" bass drums when he played for Jefferson Starship during their "Jane" era - or I think that was him, right?

Regarding the 24" bass drum - I did manage to mount my 9x13 tom on my 24" bass drum and it didn't affect me too much. And I'm 5' 1" on a good day ;)
 

ohiodrummer1964

Senior Member
That's right. I remember them too! Although I recall Aynsley was using 20" bass drums when he played for Jefferson Starship during their "Jane" era - or I think that was him, right?

Regarding the 24" bass drum - I did manage to mount my 9x13 tom on my 24" bass drum and it didn't affect me too much. And I'm 5' 1" on a good day ;)
That was Aynsley during Starship's Jane era, although I'm not sure about what size basses he used then. I do know that when he was recording Whitesnake's big blockbuster album with John Sykes on guitar, David Coverdale insisted he record with his 26" basses, and Aynsley tried to convince Coverdale that 22's would be better for recording, but Coverdale wouldn't budge. Singers!
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
That's right. I remember them too! Although I recall Aynsley was using 20" bass drums when he played for Jefferson Starship during their "Jane" era - or I think that was him, right?

Regarding the 24" bass drum - I did manage to mount my 9x13 tom on my 24" bass drum and it didn't affect me too much. And I'm 5' 1" on a good day ;)
Yeah, maybe its not that bad. I mean it is only two more inches. And I have not played shallower tom sizes before. Most have been rock tom sizes. But a 9 X 13 might work out just fine.
 

B-squared

Silver Member
So I listened to a few 24" kicks. I really like the sound. The only thing I am a little apprehensive about its tom placement. I was originally interested in having the option to mount the tom (s) on a bass drum mount, or a separate stand. But the additional height might restrict tom placement.

Do any of you use a bass tom mount on your 24" bass drums? Or have you just adapted to using a separate stand/mount?
I would try out larger sizes before you buy. A lot of the Bonham size mania is fad more than function. Personally, I hate having my rack tom too far left because I play a lot of my fills across the toms and that extra distance just makes things more difficult. I also prefer the punch of a 22 to the boom of larger diameters. Everyone is different,and you just might like larger sizes. Just don't get caught up in fads or you could regret it. The Classic Maple line is a great line. I got mine in 2011 and they are wonderful.
 
A

audiotech

Guest
I love the sound of 24" bass drums, but the rack tom placement has always been my down fall. I've played dozens of kits in this configuration, but have definite hesitations about owning one. One other limitation, as I see it, is their transportability.

Maybe just someday though.

Dennis
 
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