Things you learned not to do

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Whatever, as it relates to drums or drumming.

I'll kick this off with saying that if I come in early or late with a backbeat...the next backbeat....I have to quickly self correct and make sure the next backbeat is where it would be if I didn't hit the previous backbeat late or early.

As opposed to shifting the time to the late or early backbeat as the anchor. A no-no. Don't redo the meter period.

Basically, an automatic, meter self-correction feature.

Your turn
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Play with my wrists bent wrong. I can hurt myself if I do that. I was quickly moved into German, which I mostly use still.

That's really about it for what I shouldn't do. Most everything has been things I should do.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Wing nuts and top felts on cymbals only serve to hide the fact that your cymbal sleeve has worn through, broken, and needs to be replaced.

In addition, I have learned:

Never play poker against a man that has a gold tooth up front.

Never play billiards against anyone whose nickname references their body weight. Fat Tony, Slim Paul, etc.
 

planoranger

Junior Member
Never overplay. Never play out of balance dynamically. Never think you are "above the music"...if you are a "hired gun", they are not asking your opinion, just shut up and play.
Please don't ask me how I know these things.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Never mount a mic on a drum rack. Mount directly to the drum or use a separate stand.

But I confess, this is a tough question for a non-professional like myself. With no serious gigs lined up as far as the eye can see, I'm mostly in a dream world every day asking myself "What if?". What are the possibilities? What should I work on? What can I do here? What can I do there?

Perhaps I hate this question as much as George Carlin hates the LED segments on a digital clock face.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Relaxing when playing, I was Mr White Knuckle Ride in my teens.

The more you try and force something the worse it sounds.

Also not to leave my sticks and stool out/setup before and in between sets. Keeps the idiots away.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Stop listening to people telling you what to do or what not to do. Do what YOU do.
Well said unless you make your living playing drums and all the rules that have to be followed in that realm. But then there are the drum gods that get to do whatever they want - Vinnie once fired up a cigarette in the middle of "Tumba" at the Blue Note in Tokyo.
 
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GOOSE72

Well-known member
Well said unless you make your living playing drums and all the rules that have to be followed in that realm. But then there are the drum gods get to do whatever they want - Vinnie once fired up a cigarette in the middle of "Tumba" at the Blue Note in Tokyo.
I don't make my living playing drums and I have no rules regarding drums.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Expect a vocalist to show up on time for studio work. It's happened only rarely in my experience. Usually, they saunter in late, as though they're burdened by the whole proceeding, then demand to be catered to throughout the session. It's a reality I've learned to live with.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
Expect a vocalist to show up on time for studio work. It's happened only rarely in my experience. Usually, they saunter in late, as though they're burdened by the whole proceeding, then demand to be catered to throughout the session. It's a reality I've learned to live with.
If I was in the studio and the vocalist sauntered in late, as though they're burdened by the whole proceeding.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
If I was in the studio and the vocalist sauntered in late, as though they're burdened by the whole proceeding.
I've never found threats to have a positive impact on the matter. I've always attributed said tardiness to two factors:

I. Other musicians have equipment to set up and tune. Vocalists, not so much. Some feel they don't need to arrive as early and thus end up being late.

II. Some singers have a flare for the dramatic. They like to make "entrances." Being on time bores them. They aren't showing up to work but rather to "perform." It's kind of like being fashionably late to a party. They want the tone of the room to change when they walk in.

It's cool. Whatever. Business as usual regardless.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Always start off mid to lower volume till asked take it up a notch. So don’t start off hammering the drums with everything you got, which you can still whale at lower volumes.
 

GOOSE72

Well-known member
I've never found threats to have a positive impact on the matter. I've always attributed said tardiness to two factors:

I. Other musicians have equipment to set up and tune. Vocalists, not so much. Some feel they don't need to arrive as early and thus end up being late.

II. Some singers have a flare for the dramatic. They like to make "entrances." Being on time bores them. They aren't showing up to work but rather to "perform." It's kind of like being fashionably late to a party. They want the tone of the room to change when they walk in.

It's cool. Whatever. Business as usual regardless.
You are right it's a business. You show up on time sober and drop the drama. If you want to get paid.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
For me: don't pack for a gig without using a checklist no matter how many times you've done it.

Nothing worse than being halfway to a gig when you realize you've forgotten something at home.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
You show up on time sober and drop the drama.
Ha! I've seen a few deviations from the sober part too. Music is entertainment. Entertainment attracts characters. Characters sometimes misbehave. Misbehavior would be nonexistent in a perfect world, but so would music. We'd be self-sustaining intellective beings, requiring no stimulation beyond the innerworkings of our immutable minds. Uncontaminated and infallible? Yes. A backdrop for storytelling? Not at all.

Here's something else every drummer should "learn not to do": expect that everything will go as planned.
 
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