Things you have to "unlearn" and "relearn"

1 hit wonder

Active Member
We do some Country. Buy Me A Boat, In Color, Stay Here and Drink. Don't Rock The Jukebox, Country Girl Shake It For Me being BroCountry.

I didnt want to play Freebird, but I'll do my best.
 

BobC

Member
I'm re-learning and using traditional grip and liking it for certain songs. I found it hard at first, but it's getting easier and relieves the numbness that occurs due to mild carpal.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
if you don't like certain type of music, playing in a band is for the most part not going to make you like it

yeah...my intention was not to end up liking the music. It was to understand a different style, and to hang with people Ii like...
 

ColdFusion

Active Member
I had to unlearn my disdain for country music when I joined a country band....

still a work in progress...
When I lived in northwest North Dakota I was suffered to listen to hours of country music radio during each of my shifts at a local diner. It wasn't Texas or Nashville, but country music was still pretty king around those parts.
It was the background music to my kitchen duties for the two years I cooked there.

Country/western is a genre I never would have gone out of my way to play. I didn't listen to it in my spare time. However in that relatively short period I became (at least subconsciously) familiar with all the struggles, emotions, and tropes of the modern country idiom, lol.
By the time each shift ended my head was full of romantic, rural, patriotic themes which could only be shaken off with an hour of listening to Maynard Keenan or Brian Transeau at my apartment. 🤘😆

The little radio on the cook line didn't belong to me. Probably I could have changed the station if I wanted to, but I likely would have only found more country.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
I became (at least subconsciously) familiar with all the struggles, emotions, and tropes of the modern country idiom
The Ken Burns documentary does a fine job of explaining all things country music. Especially that it’s a business.

 

someguy01

Platinum Member
Do it. It's a good song. No reason not to.
I vehemently object. Make it go away.
Confession: I have never liked anything Lynyrd Skynyrd and yes, I have listened to plenty and couldn't change the station fast enough.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I vehemently object. Make it go away.
Confession: I have never liked anything Lynyrd Skynyrd and yes, I have listened to plenty and couldn't change the station fast enough.

I've heard other Skynyrd songs, and I've played "Simple Man" more times than I care to share. I'm not a fan of anything I've heard.
 

cbphoto

Diamond Member
The documentary on Lynyrd Skynyrd is excellent. They worked their asses off in their "hell house". They came to their recording sessions fully prepared. All those guitar solos? Written & rehearsed. And I prefer the drumming of Bob Burns over any others.

 

Rock Salad

Junior Member
I'm working at sticking the beater, and playing strict time rather than going for a lock. Also realizing that I need a bit of work at not hitting rim shots.
But I'm not really trying to unlearn anything, just add textures.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
When I lived in northwest North Dakota I was suffered to listen to hours of country music radio during each of my shifts at a local diner. It wasn't Texas or Nashville, but country music was still pretty king around those parts.
It was the background music to my kitchen duties for the two years I cooked there.

Country/western is a genre I never would have gone out of my way to play. I didn't listen to it in my spare time. However in that relatively short period I became (at least subconsciously) familiar with all the struggles, emotions, and tropes of the modern country idiom, lol.
By the time each shift ended my head was full of romantic, rural, patriotic themes which could only be shaken off with an hour of listening to Maynard Keenan or Brian Transeau at my apartment. 🤘😆

The little radio on the cook line didn't belong to me. Probably I could have changed the station if I wanted to, but I likely would have only found more country.

man, i also worked as a cook for about 8 years at an upscale seafood restaurant back in the early 90's, and we had a radio in the kitchen, but it was always playing rock or metal. We were all in charge of it, and everyone there liked (most) rock or metal. When the older guys would leave work, we would get real metal going (it had a cassette player) as a lot of them could not handle Pantera, Morbid Angel, Slayer, Bathory etc....

the one rule we had was the "No Springstein Rule": our head chef HATED Bruce Springstien (as did most of the rest of us), so if Springstein came on, you had to drop what you were doing and unplug the radio. If you didn't, you got fired. Man, we would RACE to the radio if a Springstein song came on. We had a noob iin the kitchen one day, and Spriingstien came on, and he diid not unplug the radio in time....he got fired.

such good times!!
 

1 hit wonder

Active Member
Freebird i all about the ending up-tempo part. It's not the easiest song to faithfully recreate. You can half ass it by cutting solos.

Take the Freebird challenge. It ain't so easy. This guy took it. [Youtube]

Almost nobody plays it and the response is always the same. Some are exhausted and exuberant when you're done. Some are perturbed and say, 'Yeah, whatever.' Some feel like they've witnessed something that they didn't expect and aren't ready to publicly commit to their impressions of seeing it done.

The funniest part is watching people try to dance to it. By the 2nd solo they're still into it but realize that dancing isn't working but they aren't sure how to get out of it. Lol.
 

mattmc3287

Member
I vehemently object. Make it go away.
Confession: I have never liked anything Lynyrd Skynyrd and yes, I have listened to plenty and couldn't change the station fast enough.
Vehemently. Wow. While I can understand having a certain disdain for Freebird, I feel like objectively speaking the song displays exceptional musicianship from every member of the band (as do a lot of Skynard tunes). I personally never want to play it was the closing song for every show for the better part of a decade with three different bands. But, you'd be surprised how many nights we have had some drunk A-hole slip a benjamin in the tip jar for us to play it.
 

GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
I don't know unlearning is like "unseeing" something sometimes-you just can't do it-it's stuck in your head forever. Or you may unlearn it-but it still haunts you in the echoes of your mind. This thread reminds me of Coach Hobbs my eight grad science teacher. He mispronounced about every science word possible that year and it still echoes through my mind.
 

mattmc3287

Member
One thing I have been trying to work on recently is playing with the beater off the head which, for me, means learning to play heel down. It feels SO uncomfortable and awkward for me. And I know that is largely because it is new and different. But, it really kind of almost hurts and I feel like I have no power at all. I guess if I was playing a different style of music and had the kick wide open, then the lack of power would be less of an issue, but I am struggling to see any benefit to learning heel down with the type of music I play and the bands I am playing with. Seems like I can use that time more efficiently unlearning/relearning something else. Any heel-down guys have any insight?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
One thing I have been trying to work on recently is playing with the beater off the head which, for me, means learning to play heel down. It feels SO uncomfortable and awkward for me. And I know that is largely because it is new and different. But, it really kind of almost hurts and I feel like I have no power at all. I guess if I was playing a different style of music and had the kick wide open, then the lack of power would be less of an issue, but I am struggling to see any benefit to learning heel down with the type of music I play and the bands I am playing with. Seems like I can use that time more efficiently unlearning/relearning something else. Any heel-down guys have any insight?

I have never used heel down. I feel like it is only usable for a few situations. I grew up learning jazz with heel up, so feathering is not a problem. I feel like that is what I always hear people say is the hardest to do with heel up...
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
One thing I have been trying to work on recently is playing with the beater off the head which, for me, means learning to play heel down. It feels SO uncomfortable and awkward for me. And I know that is largely because it is new and different. But, it really kind of almost hurts and I feel like I have no power at all. I guess if I was playing a different style of music and had the kick wide open, then the lack of power would be less of an issue, but I am struggling to see any benefit to learning heel down with the type of music I play and the bands I am playing with. Seems like I can use that time more efficiently unlearning/relearning something else. Any heel-down guys have any insight?

I play heel up, both feet, and let the beater rebound. It was a challenge to be able to do that, but I feel it gives me more flexibility in case I ever need to learn double bass.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
Years ago I had to retrain my hands to "unlearn" the bad technique I'd been using for a long time. I learned it from a teacher I had in my youth who taught me to keep my thumb and index finger closed tightly against the stick.
After buying instructional videos of Joe Morello and Jim Chapin I saw how much 'air' was between that space and how they let the stick breath in their hands I then spent years working on trying to learn better hand technique.

What a big difference this made in less fatigue, rebound ability & sound quality from both drums and cymbals.
 
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mattmc3287

Member
I play heel up, both feet, and let the beater rebound. It was a challenge to be able to do that, but I feel it gives me more flexibility in case I ever need to learn double bass.
Any nuggets of wisdom or specific exercises for playing heel up with the beater off the head? I don't find that I need it often, but it would be a nice tool to have in the tool kit.
 
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