Things guitarist tell drummers to do...

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Yep, a totally legit technique, though I had thought (and this seems like it should be the case if it is not already) that the idea is you record with electronic cymbals and then replace those. That way you have some simulacrum of the auditory response you're expecting, which helps not only you, but also anyone else who may be tracking along with you, most commonly bass. When you go back and replace the cymbals there is a small 'thwack' sound that will be buried by the real cymbal sound, and may just add a tad of definition to the cymbal attack.
I've never heard of trying to use e-cymbals. My thought would be, why bother? They sound terrible acoustically and that would get recorded. More over, there should be a click running to record in this manner, if that isn't enough for the bass player to go on as you track, I don't know what is. Lastly, I think they often lay down just drums first to a click when operating with separate cymbal and drum tracks. Everyone else dubs.
 

Erberderber

Senior Member
We're playing very basic punk mate. At the speed we've always played it. He wants to slow it all down. No-one else does....punk sounds pretty damn sh1t played slow.

But as he's getting older...he's getting a little lazier. Won't take a little pain for his craft.

He'll sign up to play any crappy unpaid, largely unrespected, support slot because it means he can just turn up with his guitar and plug into the backline and bugger off straight afterwards. No regard whatsoever for the fact that for the drummer (only) these 20-25 minute support slots are actually an awful experience.

You got me on a rant there....I'm not the greatest fan of guitar players....Throughout my lifetime I've found most of them to be prize bell ends I'm afraid.
I saw your band playing in a video posted on here recently and it didn't seem too fast in the slightest, a similar tempo to the likes of the Pistols and the Buzzcocks I'd say, which compared to bands like Minor Threat, is hardly thrashing it up.

I remember when I was a uni student (about 21 years old), I was the only drummer at a pub jam night, so I played along with a couple of the 40 something hosts. We were just getting to the end of the intro to 'Gimmie some lovin'" when the host of the night (on guitar and vocals) made us stop because 'if I'd gone any more quickly, his teeth would've fallen out'. So we started again to the tempo of his liking which was about as fast as 'Yellow' by Coldplay. I was a young upstart student at the time so I was obviously in the wrong.

In my current band it's more the opposite, I'm usually asked to play faster and to be (to quote the singer) 'more violent'. My problem over the years however has been less with guitarists and more with basists (see my other posts).
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Last band I was in, the keys player couldn't make rehearsal one Saturday so the bass player kept telling me to "play more cymbals to cover for Ted being out".
--- Well Yes, because all cymbals sound just like a Hammond organ or electric piano.


"Then 10 minutes later he told me to "play something else besides cymbals all the time"

---Of course, because Ted does not always play his keyboard.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
"Without you, this band wouldn't even be half as good as it is, and you make us that much better as players in our own right".

Here's a double-cut of the gig money".

Actually, they just tell me to speed up or slow down, or count us in. Sometimes one of the guys (the band leader) gives me some tips, but he also is a drummer.
 
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GeoB

Gold Member
It was kind of reversed for me. But my favorite was a temp guitarist (our regular guitarist was called away at the very last minute) who really didn't want to hear anything a mere drummer had to offer in the way of advice. "If you think you can do it better come over here and show me" I got up walked over (the rest of the band knows this) took the guitar and started wailing away on some SRV... I took about 32 bars handed him his guitar and said "like that" he didn't look at me for the rest of his short tenure.
 

SquadLeader

Gold Member
I saw your band playing in a video posted on here recently and it didn't seem too fast in the slightest, a similar tempo to the likes of the Pistols and the Buzzcocks I'd say, which compared to bands like Minor Threat, is hardly thrashing it up.

I remember when I was a uni student (about 21 years old), I was the only drummer at a pub jam night, so I played along with a couple of the 40 something hosts. We were just getting to the end of the intro to 'Gimmie some lovin'" when the host of the night (on guitar and vocals) made us stop because 'if I'd gone any more quickly, his teeth would've fallen out'. So we started again to the tempo of his liking which was about as fast as 'Yellow' by Coldplay. I was a young upstart student at the time so I was obviously in the wrong.

In my current band it's more the opposite, I'm usually asked to play faster and to be (to quote the singer) 'more violent'. My problem over the years however has been less with guitarists and more with basists (see my other posts).
Agree with you.....imagine it any slower. It'd practically be a dirge.

I'd like to play it faster.

Guitarist wants out anyway as it happens...that's another story though.
 

Winegums

Silver Member
It was kind of reversed for me. But my favorite was a temp guitarist (our regular guitarist was called away at the very last minute) who really didn't want to hear anything a mere drummer had to offer in the way of advice. "If you think you can do it better come over here and show me" I got up walked over (the rest of the band knows this) took the guitar and started wailing away on some SRV... I took about 32 bars handed him his guitar and said "like that" he didn't look at me for the rest of his short tenure.
I would have loved to see that! I've had several moments like this over the years with guitarists, singers and keyboard players.

"Well then why don't you show me how to play it!?"

"Okay then, I will"
 
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