"There is no wrong way to set up a drum kit"

dnt

Member
...except maybe this one.

S17Xwoe.jpg
Hey, whatever feels good and lends itself to better, smoother playing!
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member

Steve30907

Well-known member
It's not actually wrong. The reasoning for drum angles is that you want the stick to hit the drum at as flat an angle as possible. So if you're going to set them that low, they should be angled away from you. I don't know what he's doing with those further-away drums, but the basic concept is not wrong.

OTOH I don't know what's up with the super-high crash cymbal. I saw Ches Smith w/Marc Ribot and he had one of those. Seems dumb.
John Stanier said he did it to minimize how often he goes to the crash cymbal for that project specifically.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
He's reaching forward to reach toms. It's wrong. It's okay to say it.
I’d be willing to bet some serious money that he sets his kit up that way not for ergonomics—but to “stand out” and look different. Which to me is not a good enough reason to have that insane of a setup.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I’d be willing to bet some serious money that he sets his kit up that way not for ergonomics—but to “stand out” and look different. Which to me is not a good enough reason to have that insane of a setup.
Bingo. I saw a video where he said he sets up his drums that way to stand out and "be original."

Being different is all well and good...but being different for the sake of being different? :unsure:

...and all at the expense of good ergonomics and practicality? :unsure::unsure:

Daru performed with Jack White on SNL recently. Tons of energy and vibe. But he totally missed a tom hit because of those tom angles haha. (time stamp 5:01) Still a great performance though.

 
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iCe

Senior Member
And I'll just leave this:

Haha yeah i love his vids, especially those about stereotypes ?
Back to topic; i think a setup is wrong if the player experiences physical inconveniences while playing it. Should be an ergonomic setup and that you don't have to overstretch to reach anything.

Having said that... when i started drumming i had my toms close together because a) i saw a lot of drummers do it and b) felt comfortable. Some drummers i knew spread those toms far apart because they didn't like anything close together, but that felt like over reaching to me.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I’d be willing to bet some serious money that he sets his kit up that way not for ergonomics—but to “stand out” and look different. Which to me is not a good enough reason to have that insane of a setup.
I attended Daru’s performance at 2018 Sweetwater Gearfest. He was demonstrating the “drunk” beat (I was the only guy in the room who didn’t know what that was).

http://instagr.am/p/By-pcpRpVAV/
Later in the day I crossed paths with Daru and asked him about the setup. I thought it was to inhibit busy, flashy playing, but no. He sets up that way “100% for looks”.

He’s a very nice guy. We attended the Keith Carlock/Gretsch event and spent the hour giggling at his massive chops unchained for the demo.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
I’d be willing to bet some serious money that he sets his kit up that way not for ergonomics—but to “stand out” and look different. Which to me is not a good enough reason to have that insane of a setup.

This has always been a major part of the mantra. Any attention (publicity, promotion, etc.) is better than none.
What will get noticed? It's also been responsible for many catastrophes.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
Harry Miree has all of you beat: Lefty double pedal played right handed. Cable x-hat & ride on the right with split toms ergonomically set up all around...
 

rebonn

Senior Member
I've been trying to find a picture of a guy playing a drum set where he was reclined back with his feet in the air perhaps in a cage type thing. I think I saw it in an old drum magazine. Looking for it I encountered some other weird set ups.

The Yamaha Kit

yamaha_1.jpg

The Lazy set up
sddefault.jpg

Tommy Lee's Big Bass Phase.

Tommy-Lee-Giant-Bass-Drum.jpg

And last, a mailbox any drummer would appreciate

creative-mailboxes-301-5ae3174f90af0__605.jpg
 

TK-421

Senior Member
I attended Daru’s performance at 2018 Sweetwater Gearfest. He was demonstrating the “drunk” beat (I was the only guy in the room who didn’t know what that was).

http://instagr.am/p/By-pcpRpVAV/
Later in the day I crossed paths with Daru and asked him about the setup. I thought it was to inhibit busy, flashy playing, but no. He sets up that way “100% for looks”.

He’s a very nice guy. We attended the Keith Carlock/Gretsch event and spent the hour giggling at his massive chops unchained for the demo.
He sounds like a cool dude and he's clearly a very capable drummer. But setting his kit up like that just to stand out strikes me as wrong on so many levels. Then again, I'm not the one playing with Jack White on SNL, so what do I know?
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Just go to the actual vid to see it in action.



I have generally a "normal" setup in the practice room, but unless I'm playing standard stuff there's no reason to not play around.

A drum kit used to be a snare and bass drum + whatever needed to do the gig and I think that still applies.

I see all these kids on youtube playing covers of well known pop and rock tunes on standard kits, but reality for people who play a lot of different stuff in low volume situations and that need to be mobile is often very different.

Jared was mentioned in another thread too where he went over some stick alternatives, but he didn't really give all those tools a fair sshake. There's so mych you can do and for the ight type of situation an simple kit with a big stick bag gives you a lot of options. Change the throne for a cajon and just keep going. I sometimes go through tons of stuff to find the right timbre for the room and situation.
 
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