theoretical questions

iainp999

Junior Member
Hi everyone,

1. If you had the chance to take a few months off from work and really concentrate on your drumming, what would your approach be in order to maximise that time?

2. Going one step further, if you were to quit work tomorrow and decide to give drumming a go as a full-time career, what would your approach be?

Just interested to hear opinions.

Thanks,
Iain

EDIT: posted in "technique" as I'm thinking in terms of practice schedules etc. too.
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
i actually am doing this, because i am not in school right now, so im practicing 5 to 6 hours a day, on the set, and an hour or 2 on the pad, some times less or more either way. my approach right now is working on jazz. because i already have a good rock foundation and i think that if i really get jazz down ill be able to have complete control of my style in any genre.

i usually do a full page of stick control, each exercise 20 times each,

2 pages of 16th note swing patterns out of rothmans amazingly fantastic jazz drum book.

i go strait through about 16 pages of syncopation at various tempos

play through usually 2 charts several times to the music.

do some improv jazz stuff.

work on my time keeping with a rhythm gate.

play some things off this website (there is some good stuff)

and then i go to my pad and do stick control again the same way, just on one surface

then i do syncopation again on my pad, only one surface

pick a rudiment and practice it for 10 min.

then i work on a technique for my hands, or really try to invent a way for my hands to be suddenly faster, has not happened you but it does help me with my grip

and in between all of this i do 10 minute single strokes several times a day.

its been a big commitment, but i have seen huge rewards from this.
 

iainp999

Junior Member
excellent, thanks.

i've also been more inspired to try out jazz sometime soon. it's not really what I'm into but I always like to try new things.and will probably learn a lot from it.

thanks for sharing your schedule!
 

groovemaster_flex

Silver Member
dude, you are seriously dedicated zachopper.

i'm currently on break from university, and i have 5 months of nothing but practicing.

on the business side, i would start getting connected with people. attend jam sessions, go to live concerts, make a demo of your playing, all that good stuff. making it as a musician is all about networking. if a lot of people know you, and a lot of people know that you're good, you will always get calls to work on someone's project. set up a youtube account of all your best shows, post drum covers, lessons, rhythmic ideas, grooves, anything.

as far as practicing, here's what i do. i want to be as diverse a drummer as possible, so i studied with a WHOLE lot of people. i'm not huge on practicing to books, but i do have a lot of exercises that i picked up from fellow drummers, teachers, and even some students that i've taught. i have a 4 hour routine, where i work on individual styles. i spend an hour shedding my rock chops, an hour on jazz, and then an hour on world (which encompasses a WIDE variety of styles, including latin and afro cuban, which are NOT the same thing). the last hour i spend just jamming along to records.

play with AS MANY PEOPLE AS YOU CAN. if you're incredible, but no one knows you exist, how are you gonna get work? people also need proof that you're good, so play with them. a lot. play gigs. play clubs.

i've actually started doing this thing where i gig at clubs, playing with a dj. it's fantastic work, good pay, lots of drink, lots of fun. plus the number of ladies you get to meet is ridonk.

you have to approach drumming like you would a business. your drumming is your product, and it needs to be marketed, but it wont sell if it's not good, right?

good luck! any questions, feel free to ask.
 

groovemaster_flex

Silver Member
excellent, thanks.

i've also been more inspired to try out jazz sometime soon. it's not really what I'm into but I always like to try new things.and will probably learn a lot from it.

thanks for sharing your schedule!
when i started seriously studying jazz, i became an infinitely better drummer.
 
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