The TRUTH Behind Led Zeppelin: When The Levee Breaks

thunderstruck

Silver Member
That is really interesting. I, because of what I have read and heard, always believed that the drums were recorded in front of a stairway with a microphone at the top of the stairway. That and the natural echo in the large room was the reason for the echo. Thanks for posting.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
And if you haven't seen the documentary "It's Gonna Get Loud" (the one with Jimmy Page in it and mentioned in above YouTube) you should check it out. It's on Netflix. It's good.
 

Mendozart

Platinum Member
I have a 2:00 clip, that someone posted, of the beginning of this song. It just keeps looping, I love listening to this with headphones.
 

philrudd

Senior Member
I'm the furthest thing from a gear-head - whether it be in regards to my own instrument or the studio - but Rick Beato's videos are consistently engrossing. It's like how I barely cook but find cooking shows fascinating.
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I'm the furthest thing from a gear-head - whether it be in regards to my own instrument or the studio - but Rick Beato's videos are consistently engrossing. It's like how I barely cook but find cooking shows fascinating.
I love them, too. I just like the way Rick presents information about music. Whether it's deconstructing "what makes this song great" (maybe my favorite thing he does) or talking about gear and the way things have changed in the business. One of the best music-related channels on YouTube for my money's worth.
 

mikel

Platinum Member
So as most of us already knew, it was recorded at Hedley Grange with two mic's high up the stairs, making the sound of the drums huge. The limiter and echo simply add repeats to the pattern. For me its the use of only two mic's, their placement, and the position of the kit in a huge tall space that show how creative a producer/engineer can be.

It makes a change from a lot of studios today that insist on stuffing drums with pillows and damping heads so the "Engineer" can get the only sound he knows how to get out of a kit.
 

Bonzodownunder

Senior Member
It's ALL in november 2011 Rythmm magazine's 40th anniversary of 'Led Zeppelin IV", in which they interview the engineer the great&late Andy Johns about it,
He's quiet specific about exactly&precisely HOW he recorded the drums, WHERE he recorded them even down to microphones used&there placement&mentions the compression&echo devices,
Sadly it's no longer available from "Music Radar" (publishers of Rythmm magazine) in magazine form but only if you subscribe to there "digital" online subscription,
There's however a copy on Ebay UK,
I've got 2x copies&no i'm not selling them! :).
 

Merlin5

Gold Member
It's ALL in november 2011 Rythmm magazine's 40th anniversary of 'Led Zeppelin IV", in which they interview the engineer the great&late Andy Johns about it,
He's quiet specific about exactly&precisely HOW he recorded the drums, WHERE he recorded them even down to microphones used&there placement&mentions the compression&echo devices,
Sadly it's no longer available from "Music Radar" (publishers of Rythmm magazine) in magazine form but only if you subscribe to there "digital" online subscription,
There's however a copy on Ebay UK,
I've got 2x copies&no i'm not selling them! :).
You could perhaps scan the article and upload it?
 
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