The Therapeutic Value Of Drumming

wraub

Well-known member
The ability to feel creative while also hitting things is not to be underestimated... the release of tensions, the force of the power, the catharsis of the sounds, the physicality, the simple stress release...

How come nobody told me about it? Anybody else appreciate this?

:)
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
If I didnt have a pile of dogs, my house could get robbed while I'm playing. My brain is entirely somewhere else. I get so lost in the rhythm and patterns of sounds.

If I'm being honest, just hitting an 18" floor tom makes me giggle. I dont get tired of it. Its like harnessing a small bit of thunder.
 

wraub

Well-known member
If I didnt have a pile of dogs, my house could get robbed while I'm playing. My brain is entirely somewhere else. I get so lost in the rhythm and patterns of sounds.

If I'm being honest, just hitting an 18" floor tom makes me giggle. I dont get tired of it. Its like harnessing a small bit of thunder.
Right?
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I think one of the great things about modern metal drumming is the foot speed and control from double bass. From a technique standpoint, the top speed metal guys are technical beasts, really pushing the limits of speed and control. I don’t enjoy that music at all, but I love how they’re pushing the envelope. And I think the foot technique levels they’re achieving are almost certainly really, really good for your brain.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
It shares a commonality with “magic mushrooms” as both are a trip-and magical. LOL. But I really do get off on it and I’m not really sure how I do it. I can generally be clumsy but on kit more coordinated . Though often I’m fully concentrating on music sometimes I go into autopilot as I’m off somewhere else. It brings symmetry to my life and tranquility. Reminds me how being around large bodies of water makes me feel centered - get same feeling.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It's hard for me to get into the meditative state. I can never seem to empty my mind for long enough.

But when I'm practicing drums or performing...the meditative state can come pretty quickly and easily...I love that about playing drums.

From a therapeutic point of view, drums absolutely do it for me.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
music to me is the ultimate Zen; it has always been my religion; it is my spirituality; it is the secret language and communication on the journey to Ain Soph

drums, bass, and teaching the language and Zen of music to other people are the direct reflection of my connection to the journey

through the ages, mystics, alchemists, shaman, spiritual gurus, monks, nuns, priests....all are supposedly looking for the Divine Connection, and I strongly feel that music is it. In the 1800's, John Dee - a court astrologer in France - supposedly was given the "Language of the Angels/God" in a series of dreams etc. etc.

I think it has always been here in the form of sound/music. The Divine Connection. Music is the ULTIMATE universal language. All humans - and many animals - will stop what they are doing and react to music. It is so empowering...mind blowing really.

and then, when you think about the physics/mathematical elements that are involved in music, it adds to the depth of the mystery of numbers, vibration, circularity, physical and psychological connections....

just awesome!!! I don't have enough room in this thread to cover what this all really means to me
 
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Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I think one of the great things about modern metal drumming is the foot speed and control from double bass. From a technique standpoint, the top speed metal guys are technical beasts, really pushing the limits of speed and control. I don’t enjoy that music at all, but I love how they’re pushing the envelope. And I think the foot technique levels they’re achieving are almost certainly really, really good for your brain.

I also feel...on the opposite end, that the experimentation with space, sustain, duration, timber combination, slow tempos etc that people like Cage, Chavez, Rouse, Reich and other orchestral/chamber composers do are great for the same space in the brain!!
 

iCe

Senior Member
The ability to feel creative while also hitting things is not to be underestimated... the release of tensions, the force of the power, the catharsis of the sounds, the physicality, the simple stress release...

How come nobody told me about it? Anybody else appreciate this?

:)
Yup! Me and the guitar player i play with always play the same song as a warming up: it has everything in it to get things in motion.
Near the end are a few bars of simple 16th note double bass (at around 100 bpm or so) and we always react like 'oh yeah, that's the sh*t'. Just something special about crash riding and starting (as i call it) 'to fire the cannons'. The guitar player sits 2 meters in front of me and just loves all that low end being shot towards him haha
 

Icetech

Gold Member
It's pretty much the thing that keeps me going.. normally i play 2-4 hours every night (for the last 7 years) it's like meditation at the end of my days.. since having this shoulder replaced i haven't played in 6 weeks and i'm literally going nuts... (i'm insane... just harder to keep under control without drumming)
So yeah... i find it therapeutic :)
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I beat my kit like it owes me money. The simple act of (controlled) hitting of something when stressed is relief beyond belief.
I wouldn't trade it for anything else.
 
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