The sound of the drum is within the heads

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
I saw the video where the dude made an entire kit out of plywood, because he didnt have a small enough kit to play for a particular project. Plywood is about $50 a sheet. He spent WELL over the cost of a decent stage custom. Not to mention all the time spent widdling it into shape.



 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I saw the video where the dude made an entire kit out of plywood, because he didnt have a small enough kit to play for a particular project. Plywood is about $50 a sheet. He spent WELL over the cost of a decent stage custom. Not to mention all the time spent widdling it into shape.



The shells can all be had from 1 sheet of plywood. A 20" drum lays out flat to under 6'.

The trash can kit sounds better (on my phone) IMO.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
Good lord, to sit back and just say "It's all in the heads" and "all drums sound pretty much the same" is really, really sad to me.
Yeah, it's very similar to when you find out about Santa and the Easter Bunny. But we all grow up.

Drummers? Well maybe not ;)
 
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Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
The shells can all be had from 1 sheet of plywood. A 20" drum lays out flat to under 6'.

The trash can kit sounds better (on my phone) IMO.
But isn't he building the shells from cut rings stacked up on each other? I guess all the different drum sizes can be 'nested' for cutting - but he'd still need a whole stack of rings per drum.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
You could make drum shells like a cajon out of wood-produce a square kit except where your batter head will attach (no need for a reso except snare). You could make it all one big box the toms on top of box and bass drum bottom face and back (it will have two heads-you gotta have a reso for your band name LOL)-still have a real snare-just replace toms and bass drum wit the box that will hold drum heads. If successful I'll call it the Spongebob drum kit cause it will be square-and a completely idiotic idea-but heck people have bought pet rocks. It will be just one giant chamber with drum heads attached to it and a pedal. I predict it might sound "boxy" LOL. Dang if I'm not tempted to build it-use that thin plywood like for crafts-so thin shells LOL. I wonder if I can find some 12 and 16 rims of plastic, metal, or wood to craft my bearing edge for my trash plywood box kit? I'll just jerry rig hardware but use real hoops and heads. It shouldn't matter and this kit will sound like a Gretsch USA custom-so of course The Spongebox will dominate the market because it's always been in my head this whole time LOL. Actually drop the bass reso head and just add a whole for mic-which will capture bass and toms with one mic-since all on one big chamber. Write name on box face. I think that thin plywood wouldn't hold up so I'm going with thicker board.
 
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Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
A Porsche and a Honda Civic both drive down a residential street at 15 miles per hour and then park on the side of the street.

Internet experts declare “they drive the same”. o_O
Given that the guy actually builds his own 'cars' and also drives them at surprisingly high speeds - he might qualify as more than an 'internet expert'.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
You could make drum shells like a cajon out of wood-produce a square kit except where your batter head will attach (no need for a reso except snare). You could make it all one big box the toms on top of box and bass drum bottom face and back (it will have two heads-you gotta have a reso for your band name LOL)-still have a real snare-just replace toms and bass drum wit the box that will hold drum heads. If successful I'll call it the Spongebob drum kit cause it will be square-and a completely idiotic idea-but heck people have bought pet rocks. It will be just one giant chamber with drum heads attached to it and a pedal. I predict it might sound "boxy" LOL. Dang if I'm not tempted to build it-use that thin plywood like for crafts-so thin shells LOL. I wonder if I can find some 12 and 16 rims of plastic, metal, or wood to craft my bearing edge for my trash plywood box kit? I'll just jerry rig hardware but use real hoops and heads. It shouldn't matter and this kit will sound like a Gretsch USA custom-so of course The Spongebox will dominate the market because it's always been in my head this whole time LOL.
If you make it expensive and pretentious enough - there are plenty of airheads with more sense than money that will buy it, even if it is functionally useless. If they'll buy Dyson vacuum cleaners, they'll buy any old ****.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Yeah, it's very similar to when you find out about Santa and the Easter Bunny.
You mean they dated for a while?

But isn't he building the shells from cut rings stacked up on each other? I guess all the different drum sizes can be 'nested' for cutting - but he'd still need a whole stack of rings per drum.
Oh, maybe. I was under the impression he bent the shell. Maybe he did stack rings, I'll watch again and more closely.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
If I spray my new Spongebox drum kits on the inside with a silver sealer am I breaking some law? I'll wood burn some cool patterns and then add gold leaf and maybe some zirconium stones. Maybe make it like one of those tiny homes-capture two markets-you can play it and live in it.
 

Ruok

Silver Member
Help me understand this, because I'm a little skeptical. I'm not trying to be difficult, honestly. My question is to you drummers that claim that the shell itself makes a noticeable difference. Let's say that you are there in person with the drums and not listening through any speakers of any kind. Can you tell which wood, or other material, is being played just by listening to a drum? If you were part of a blind test of various shells, could you discern which wood was which? And what about if you were hearing those same drums mixed in with other musical instruments? Could you still tell which shell was which?
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Help me understand this, because I'm a little skeptical. I'm not trying to be difficult, honestly. My question is to you drummers that claim that the shell itself makes a noticeable difference. Let's say that you are there in person with the drums and not listening through any speakers of any kind. Can you tell which wood, or other material, is being played just by listening to a drum? If you were part of a blind test of various shells, could you discern which wood was which? And what about if you were hearing those same drums mixed in with other musical instruments? Could you still tell which shell was which?
To be clear, I'm claiming the shell material can make a discernible difference should the drum's construction be such that those differences can present themselves. This also means that shell material, all other things being equal, probably won't make a discernible difference in many cases.

Straight answer to both of your questions is no, and that's because I likely wouldn't have a reference point. However, if the drums were of a construction that allowed such differences to feature, on listening, I would probably have an identifiable preference.
 
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