The sound of the drum is within the heads

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
I agree 100% with the video. All the shitty little Chinese drums sound the same and no better than $10.00 junker from ebay. Thanks for sharing!!!

Can't help myself. LOL
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
I just sold 1967 set of Rogers to a Violin builder! go figure.. I've just about finished my Coffee, I'll go now. nice chatting.. I've always played my drums wide open, drives sound guys nuts... just means that aren't good at sound really.. oh a little more sarcasm for ya"s, next time you get a new kit , throw away the drums and keep the cardboard boxes..
 
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GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I'm in agreement here. The shell has a specific resonance which, depending on the head and the tuning of the head, can affect the sustain. How it affects attack - the portion of the sound wave from the strike of the drum head (t0) to the peak (tpeak) in volume of the sound wave - I'm not sure.

Would be interesting if someone knows if 'attack' refers to the change in amplitude of the sound volume between t0 and tpeak, or does it also include the time from t0 to tpeak. Ie, does a drum with 'better attack' mean a greater amplitude change between t0 and
Isn’t it going zero to max volume? Anyways concert toms have more attack- to me- I guess the reso head muffles it somewhat since it absorbs energy when the movement of air activates its oscillations.? The density and mass of the material of drum should matter - but sll drum choices are “hard materials” so i guess all densities well beyond the material having any mechanical influence? Though metal vs wood should. But the drum chamber is an acoustic funnel that will also produce (turbulent flow) bouncing interference sound waves that alters the initial sound . Makes me wonder does sll sustain really come from reso head? Without it my Pearl POD RT and concert toms I’ve played bark a shorter note- it seems . Lot of attack but fizzle to my ear. The lil RT has a pleasing tone but a short note that doesn’t carry except in a small room
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Isn’t it going zero to max volume? Anyways concert toms have more attack- to me- I guess the reso head muffles it somewhat since it absorbs energy when the movement of air activates its oscillations.? The density and mass of the material of drum should matter - but sll drum choices are “hard materials” so i guess all densities well beyond the material having any mechanical influence? Though metal vs wood should. But the drum chamber is an acoustic funnel that will also produce (turbulent flow) bouncing interference sound waves that alters the initial sound . Makes me wonder does sll sustain really come from reso head? Without it my Pearl POD RT and concert toms I’ve played bark a shorter note- it seems . Lot of attack but fizzle to my ear. The lil RT has a pleasing tone but a short note that doesn’t carry except in a small room
While not all sustain comes from the reso head, a lot of it does. Concert toms absolutely have more attack for that very reason. Their tone is concentrated and thus truncated.
 

mrjones

Well-known member
Alright i have a question arent thicker shells better i mean i see them on the high end kits .and i feel like the less plys they use the more they save
 

mrjones

Well-known member
I dont know if thicker shells sound any different..from what everyone says its in the heads but if i spend the money on a intermediate kit im not buying the new hype ive seen on some drums where thin is better
 

dboomer

Senior Member
I dont know if thicker shells sound any different..from what everyone says its in the heads but if i spend the money on a intermediate kit im not buying the new hype ive seen on some drums where thin is better
Well “better” is a tough word. But there are some definite factors for both. Thicker shells generally means stiffer shells. Stiffer shells are louder then more flexible thinner shells. The more a shell flexes the more affect it has on tone because in order to get a shell to vibrate it has to draw energy away from the heads. That loss of energy is not even so it is in effect cancelling some of the frequencies of that drum. So what you are left with is a change in tone.

Is that better or worse?
 

jimb

Member
I beg to disagree a little somewhat due to the nature of different materials.
As a serious woodworker/engineer I see it two ways. So two extremes. A hard wood like mahogany will not absorb sound waves like a soft wood so will be on the brighter spectrum. Basswood should be warmer but then we have glues, compression between layers etc...
But I can guarantee this. 30 years stood in front of drummers as a bassist and not once did I care what the drums sounded like cause out front it all sounded the same to me and my fellow musicians.
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
I beg to disagree a little somewhat due to the nature of different materials.
As a serious woodworker/engineer I see it two ways. So two extremes. A hard wood like mahogany will not absorb sound waves like a soft wood so will be on the brighter spectrum. Basswood should be warmer but then we have glues, compression between layers etc...
But I can guarantee this. 30 years stood in front of drummers as a bassist and not once did I care what the drums sounded like cause out front it all sounded the same to me and my fellow musicians.
That’s the point isn’t it? Once you are in amongst the melee of a band (particularly rock/metal which is my main genre), the subtle nuances disappear so the main differences are aesthetic and build/hardware. No one is slamming high end gear here, I’m fortunate enough to have high end gear myself and love it. At the same time I’m not going to look down my nose at cheaper gear, particularly when I know it’s decent quality and I know I can get a good sound out of it that suits my musical needs. :unsure: (y) :)
 

paradiddle pete

Platinum Member
Funny you should say that after I watched that video I watched a video " rock " from 1963 recorded in mono that still has way more nuance than the "bin " kit.. I can't see how a genre negates any need for good tone..
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Funny you should say that after I watched that video I watched a video " rock " from 1963 recorded in mono that still has way more nuance than the "bin " kit.. I can't see how a genre negates any need for good tone..
You might be missing the point.
He's taken the worst imaginable shell combo to show you that it STILL sounds like a drumkit.
He doesn't pretend it sounds great - the miracle is that it sounds way better than most would believe possible.
Conventional wisdom says that kit should sound intolerable. It doesn't.
 
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Iristone

Well-known member
Speaking of mics I think I think my prefence is along the line of: either wide open and open miking, or heavily dampened (think Ringo's towel) with close miking. Too open and close miking doesn't work very well with me, a bit muddy.
 
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