The reason for the Gretsch sound?

yammyfan

Senior Member
The difference between brands and kits isn't vast when similar heads and tuning are used but thankfully there is a difference. I've heard Yamaha drums occasionally described as "clean" and "clinical" sounding and having owned many, I can see how that description sometimes applies.

My Gretsch kit sounds substantially different than my Yamaha kits, and different than the Sonor, Tama, Ludwig, Pearl and Mapex kits I've played. I'm as happy as could be about that, and grateful for the difference. Variety is the spice of life.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
The difference between brands and kits isn't vast when similar heads and tuning are used but thankfully there is a difference. I've heard Yamaha drums occasionally described as "clean" and "clinical" sounding and having owned many, I can see how that description sometimes applies.

My Gretsch kit sounds substantially different than my Yamaha kits, and different than the Sonor, Tama, Ludwig, Pearl and Mapex kits I've played. I'm as happy as could be about that, and grateful for the difference. Variety is the spice of life.
If I was you I'd have lived a much better less turmoil filled life. I applaud your outlook. Me?..i hear (a) sound and if it's not achieved its always second best. I am......under a mild curse.
 

RK1

Member
The difference between brands and kits isn't vast when similar heads and tuning are used but thankfully there is a difference. I've heard Yamaha drums occasionally described as "clean" and "clinical" sounding and having owned many, I can see how that description sometimes applies.

My Gretsch kit sounds substantially different than my Yamaha kits, and different than the Sonor, Tama, Ludwig, Pearl and Mapex kits I've played. I'm as happy as could be about that, and grateful for the difference. Variety is the spice of life.

Yamaha does have a clean sound. I’ve noticed that myself.
 

RickP

Gold Member
Gretsch was making drums in the 50’s and 60’s that were very different from the competition at the time . They stopped doing the reinforcing rings , did a different bearing edge and went to diecast hoops . They also started outsourcing shells eventually to Jasper wood products instead of making in house . Yes I realize Gretsch made shell in house in the 50’s . Their use of the silver sealer was different than the White ceiling paint Ludwig used , trunk paint used by Rogers etc .
Gretsch also had cornered the market in New York with many of the NY bass drummers having endorsement deals with Gretsch . Many boomer players grew up jonesing for a Gretsch kit . Many Players with endorsement deals had a Gretsch kit at home or used them in the studio .

The Great Gretsch sound are resonant drums with the ability to be tuned up and not choke . The bass drums are fantastic and so easy to dial in . The resonance is tamed by the diecast hoops a bit which makes them ideal recording drums .
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
The difference between brands and kits isn't vast when similar heads and tuning are used but thankfully there is a difference. I've heard Yamaha drums occasionally described as "clean" and "clinical" sounding and having owned many, I can see how that description sometimes applies.

My Gretsch kit sounds substantially different than my Yamaha kits, and different than the Sonor, Tama, Ludwig, Pearl and Mapex kits I've played. I'm as happy as could be about that, and grateful for the difference. Variety is the spice of life.

That's what I like about the 2010/2011 run of Renowns. They have kind of a rough and tumble sound about them. More so than the USA Custom and Brooklyn kits I had. That's not to say I didn't like the others but being a rock/soul/funk player these Renowns just have this kind of an "in your face" sound about them. Much different than my two Sonor kits.

New Renowns are good too, I just prefer the die cast hoops, rims mounts, and 100% N Amer maple of the older ones.
 
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Lennytoons

Senior Member
I've got the older Renowns. They record beautifully and do have a unique, sweet sound. I can't imagine drums with more sustain, even with the die cast hoops.
 

incrementalg

Gold Member
That's what I like about the 2010/2011 run of Renowns. They have kind of a rough and tumble sound about them. More so than the USA Custom and Brooklyn kits I had. That's not to say I didn't like the others but being a rock/soul/funk player these Renowns just have this kind of an "in your face" sound about them. Much different than my two Sonor kits.

New Renowns are good too, I just prefer the die cast hoops, rims mounts, and 100% N Amer maple of the older ones.
I've agree...to my ears, the prior generation Renown's have an edge to the sound. They also have an almost tribal sound when someone lays into them...which is perfect for rock/funk...etc.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I swear if I read just one more pro renown kit remark I'm gonna jump up and down over my recent obtainage of my mint sparkle kit.
 
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