The paradox of expensive drumsets

Jim I'm going into the kitchen You need Ice?
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Check the price of a hi end set 9 years ago.
that's what I was talking about timing/ that would be tripled today
 
I had a funny thought the other day, bare with me...

When buying a high end drum kit, you can spend a decent amount of money, let's say, 6-10k. Let's imagine you're getting a 5 or 6 piece kit (which are probably the most common)

Now it's likely if you're spending that much money on a kit, you've probably already got a few nice snare drums, so you're just getting a kick and toms

Now, i think we've all figured out that a kick is a kick is a kick. They all sound broadly the same (obviously there are little differences, but again, humour me)

So in the end, you're pay a lot of money for... toms. The most unused part of a drum kit. Unless you're doing tom fills constantly, or you're Danny Carey, toms don't get played nearly as much as the snare or kick, so you're spending a bunch of money on something that barely gets played, comparatively.

Kinda weird when you think about it. Thank you for coming to my TED talk.

I'm always wondering who's buying all of those DW, Gretsch, and Ludwig $3,000+ kits. I mean there are a ton of them hundreds and hundreds of them every week. The market for drums must be a lot larger than I realize like hundreds of thousands of drummers buying expensive gear all the time.
 
I guess it depends on your understanding of important. Do you suppose if Jeff had used his Pearl kit then all of the hit songs he played on would have never been hits? So was it “important”?

I’m betting if you played your 50 favorite artist’s recordings you’ll hear 50 different sounding drums. And the process of recording, different mics and eq gotta make a substantial difference to whatever kit you brought in.

Play whatever makes you happy.
It's not important to you, it was important to him. He was in the studio every day almost.
Kenny Aronoff records his Tama kit with a vintage Ludwig bass drum.....but then all bass drums are the same o_O
As to your last point, the top professionals obviously feel 'whatever' drum kit they bring in counts, or they wouldn't choose what they do.
 
It's not important to you, it was important to him. He was in the studio every day almost.
Kenny Aronoff records his Tama kit with a vintage Ludwig bass drum.....but then all bass drums are the same o_O
As to your last point, the top professionals obviously feel 'whatever' drum kit they bring in counts, or they wouldn't choose what they do.
You are missing my point. I’m not suggesting they all sound the same. I’m saying that (within reason) it doesn’t matter all that much to people listening to the music. Would the radio station have NOT played Kenny’s recordings if he had used his Tama kick instead? I’m not losing sleep over it ;)

Especially in light of how much an engineer can manipulate the sound of an instrument during the recording process.
 
And if someone wants to convince themself that expensive kits are a waste or that mid-priced kits sound better, let them have at it.
It doesn't make them right. ;)
 
You are missing my point. I’m not suggesting they all sound the same. I’m saying that (within reason) it doesn’t matter all that much to people listening to the music. Would the radio station have NOT played Kenny’s recordings if he had used his Tama kick instead? I’m not losing sleep over it ;)

Especially in light of how much an engineer can manipulate the sound of an instrument during the recording process.
I didn't miss your point.
Of course it doesn't matter to the audience. I don't work to the level of what the audience expects, I work to the level of what is regarded as professionalism. It matters to the drummer and it usually matters to the producer or recording engineer.
If it generally didn't matter Porcaro would have recorded his stock Pearl kit and Aronoff would be recording his Tama bass drum.
Yes, yes, yes, an engineer can eq the kick or add a sample, but in the realm of professionals you turn up to the studio with your absolute best sounding drums - not something 'that will do'.
Sorry, it's just the reality.
 
Man, there's nothing wrong with a Stage Custom, but those kicks definitely don't sound anything like my Birch Absolutes or my Gretsch.

I also play a lot of toms, so I like em to sound good. No mid-range kit is going to beat my BCANs for clarity of note, and at any rate a new Renown now costs more than I paid for my first (the most expensive) BCAN kit...
Yeah, those BCANs are great drums, no doubt about it. Ironically, I sold mine and used the money to buy a six piece set of Renowns. To my ears the Renowns sound every bit as good as the Yamaha's, in a different yet equally pleasing way.

I would buy another BCAN if a similar deal fell in my lap but that's highly unlikely.
 
I didn't miss your point.
Of course it doesn't matter to the audience. I don't work to the level of what the audience expects, I work to the level of what is regarded as professionalism. It matters to the drummer and it usually matters to the producer or recording engineer.
If it generally didn't matter Porcaro would have recorded his stock Pearl kit and Aronoff would be recording his Tama bass drum.
Yes, yes, yes, an engineer can eq the kick or add a sample, but in the realm of professionals you turn up to the studio with your absolute best sounding drums - not something 'that will do'.
Sorry, it's just the reality.

Well, you turn up with your drums that record best. I wouldn’t necessarily record my copper shell kit, if I were doing a legit studio recording. It’s all low-mids and mids. The exact opposite of birch. Requires way too much muffling to sound good on a recording. But live and unmiked? Oh god. Lol
 
I'm not worried at all what anyone else buys and I never said I was, if anything, I said I'm going to buy an expensive kit one day.
Wish you well with it. My point is it's not really a paradox. It's just the way of the world for instruments today, where the beginner stuff is miles ahead of what it used to be, but top shelf stuff is still top shelf. Either gets you there as long as you play well.
 
Play is only 1 facet. Cheap kits can have cheap hardware. Some suffer from poor quality or poor adjustability. Some have hardware that corrodes faster.

Cheaper kits have their place. First kit I ended up with had those issues. First kit I purposely bought is so much better that I still play it.
 
Certainly the hype plays a big part in getting bookings. We just disagree on what is top level requirement.
Really, Porcaro and Aronoff worked because of hype?????
The top players use the gear that they think will get the job done. It doesn't have to be hand built out of rare wood. But it is often gear that is widely accepted as excellent - like Ludwig Black Beauties, N&C snares, vintage Gretsch, Ludwig and Camco.
If they are using a stock factory kit, it has often been gone over by a top drum tech to check the edges etc.
 
unusual config
20/13/16/18

mumlyyzl5mc5vhfwuqei.jpg

wonder what prev owner was thinking/had in mind/
rs3ktyxdvy5rv3wq7fbn.jpg

"small but still wants to keep lead singer at a safe distance"..
 
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unusual config
20/13/16/18

mumlyyzl5mc5vhfwuqei.jpg

wonder what prev owner was thinking/had in mind/
rs3ktyxdvy5rv3wq7fbn.jpg

"small but still wants to keep lead singer a safe distance"..

I bet there is a 24 kick that isn’t being sold, or was planned to be bought, but never got bought
 
I've had several musicians and a frontman who hired me comment on the beauty and sound of the drums I bought and use.
 
unusual config
20/13/16/18
20, 13, 16 was a standard Gretsch configuration, called the "Name Band". My RB kit is a "Name Band" The Caddy Green is a nod to that.

1 b 20, 13, 16.jpg
 
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