The new Rogers kits

acsunda

Junior Member
Steve Jordan disagrees 😂

He even took one on a world wide major tour with JM, whilst being in a relationship with Yamaha 😬
Like I said, there are definitely nice Roger's kits out there, but for my money I'd take a Slingerland, a Premier, or a Gretsch over a Rodgers any day. But that's mostly an aesthetic choice on my part.
 

MusiQmaN

Platinum Member
Like I said, there are definitely nice Roger's kits out there, but for my money I'd take a Slingerland, a Premier, or a Gretsch over a Rodgers any day. But that's mostly an aesthetic choice on my part.
I heard he did it because of the hardware.

Which was the best compared to Ludwig, Gretsch and the others from those years.

And to play a vintage gig on a Mayer world tour (pun intended) you have to rely on rock solid hardware. Combine that with the beautiful Wine Red Ripple and you do have a solid kit.
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
Y’all are gagging on the price just like I did when I first saw the price of a Tama Star kit. Almost identical queries and responses to what went down in the now-defunct Tama forum. 😂

Got a 4-piece Tama Star Walnut for $3,500, and paid an extra $400 just to get the finish I wanted. Could've got another finish for nearly $3,100 OTD. Had a bell bronze shell made to fit into my 6.5" free floating chassis (Pearl) and paid less for 4 Star Walnut drums, 2 STAR tom stands and a bell bronze snare than this overpriced Rogers nonsense.
 

Phil A.

Junior Member
At that price they should at least give the option for a swivomatic mount. Not everyone likes a virgin bass drum.
 
As I said in a previous post, for this price, I'll continue to live in my Ludwig, Pearl, Tama, and Noble and Cooley neighborhood. Take your pick. Rogers had great pioneering designs in terms of hardware and quality, but the styling never knocked me out. Couple that with, an at best, quirky flagship snare drum, there's a lot of great options for the price of these three drums without a snare drum. Remember, back in the day, they were number four behind Ludwig, Slingerland, and Gretsch. There were good reasons for that, including the price tag . All of this, and still not mentioning the hard-charging big three from Japan at the time.
 

MusiQmaN

Platinum Member
Didn’t Rogers design the original memory lock?

I checked out some of those old kits on Reverb and the tom mount looks very flimsy.
The hardware was even put on the other big names as a request by artists from said companies because of their trustworthyness.

Because the where so thin but sturdy it made the toms sing more.
 
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harryconway

Platinum Member
Didn’t Rogers design the original memory lock?
Memriloc came out in 1976. Heavy duty stuff.
I checked out some of those old kits on Reverb and the tom mount looks very flimsy.
What you probably saw was the earlier Swivomatic stuff. Still, a lot of guys swapped their hardware out FOR Swivomatic. It was better than most, at least. John Bonham had a Swivomatic tom holder on his maple Ludwig kit.
 

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IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
It's a nostalgia tax IMHO.

Rogers is charging $4300 because they think their target audience of 60+ year olds have that kind of money, and would do anything for that Rogers nostalgia. There is no other reason they should be priced that high.

Other premium Taiwanese kits cost 1-2k less for a comparable setup.

They took a gamble with high profit margins, and I think they've made a big mistake...especially considering the whole Covid thing.
 
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PaisteGuy

Well-known member
$4300 USD translates to $5726.14 Canadian for a 3 piece kit. That’s Frikin’ balls to capitalize on nostalgia.
 
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opentune

Platinum Member
Rogers kits sound great, new or old. But this is totally marketing nostalgia. Its a bad move, as the target demographic for these kits will soon be octagenarians.
 

jasz

Junior Member
Please name a few Taiwanese brands. I know of none.
Much of the drum market contracts out of Taiwan.

Gretsch (Renown and snares + hardware)
Gibraltar (hardware)
DW (Design and various snares; older PDP + most hardware).
Ludwig (Evolution, centennial and snares + Hardware)
Porkpie (Various Snares and kits. These were an insane value in the early 2000s + hardware)

Pearl (Most high end drums and certain metal snares)
Yamaha (Tour custom and Recording custom metal snares)

And etc...

I'm not sure if Yamaha shares Reliance as an OEM, but the tour custom shell looks fairly similar to the Renown in terms wood combination being NA maple with Asian plies in the middle.

Dixon/Reliances own kits are actually insanely well priced on musicians friend/GC. Lack of real marketing/brand awareness though. People tend to buy into the idea of a brand.. Which is why unknown "third parties" without an identity typically re-release under an established name.
 
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blinky

Senior Member
Didn’t Rogers design the original memory lock?

I checked out some of those old kits on Reverb and the tom mount looks very flimsy.
In the sixties they had the Swiv-o-matic hardware, which I think is functional, but may look "flimsy' . In the seventies Rogers designed the more sturdy Memrilock system.
 
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