The more I progress, the less it matters.

Timmy

Well-known member
Seems the more I progress, the less my equipment, accessories, etc... matters. Not saying everything was in my head. I think it did matter (sticks, pedals, shoes, etc...) Now, it just doesn't seem to matter as much anymore.
 

Timmy

Well-known member
Playing with beautiful tempo/meter coupled with good feel/instincts/experience and a good sense of dynamics.... is a trillion times more important than gear.

Especially these days when gear is so bulletproof.
Well, for instance, when I first got back into it, I preferred the beefier, more rudimentary sticks. The smaller/lighter sticks were just WAY too fast. They would get away from me. Now, I have no problem with them. I have about 7 different pairs of sticks at my disposal I can grab at anytime. I don't bother as much with my shoes either anymore.
Yes, there are differences, they're just not as important it seems anymore. I guess that's a good thing to be able to hop on anyone's kit and start jamming.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Seems the more I progress, the less my equipment, accessories, etc... matters. Not saying everything was in my head. I think it did matter (sticks, pedals, shoes, etc...) Now, it just doesn't seem to matter as much anymore.
I just get pickier. The way everything feels, the gears painstakingly perfect positioning, drum sizes, socks only (no shoes), stick everything, it all comes back to feel and comfort. I've spent so much time getting everything just right that I don't want to play anything else.
 

Benthedrummer

Junior Member
Seems the more I progress, the less my equipment, accessories, etc... matters. Not saying everything was in my head. I think it did matter (sticks, pedals, shoes, etc...) Now, it just doesn't seem to matter as much anymore.

Yeah.....I totally hear you.

I've never really been a gear guy.

When I have my periods away from the kit and I get back into playing, I always try to find ways to play the stuff I already have better than before.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I tend to agree with the OP. As your technical proficiency increases and you can really play well no matter what kind of equipment you are playing, you make the equipment sound good, not the other way around. That's not to say equipment isn't important. It is, because even if you are amazing, a good quality kit will allow you to push the envelope of your own greatness rather than a junky one holding you back some. In the end, I think saying gear doesn't matter is a bit of an overgeneralization. But saying equipment doens't matter AS MUCH, is pretty accurate.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I think this phenomenon is related to; when a great professional drummer sits down with a junkie set of drums and makes them sound good?

(Ha ! MntnMan62 above was thinking the same as me)

.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Depending on our ability, and what we enjoy about drumming, it narrows as we age. I just got back into drumming a little over a year ago. I just spent 7 hours the other day disassembling a floor tom, pulling the wrap, sanding it and getting all of the adhesive off of the shell, re-wrapping the shell, etc etc etc. I love it! I enjoy this work, almost more than playing.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I'm with the OP.

The longer I play the less it matters what I play.

I mean, damn... The house kit in the city last night? Rack tom setup as floor tom, no actual floor tom, and the bass drum was literally missing it's spurs, while the snare kept having the throw come loose mid-song.

Even I'm surprised to say it didn't really phase me. The show went on. Honestly it was still better than hauling a drum kit into a small SF club.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Another opposite checking in. I'm about 12 years into my second go around on drums. My first time around, age 10 to 18, my drums, cymbals, pedals, stands, heads, etc, never crossed my mind. It literally never occurred to me to upgrade or change anything . . . . . . . . . and my first kit was awful beyond words. You would have had to see it believe it. I just played and practiced for hours a day.

This time around I'm a full on gear fetishist.
 
Last edited:

beatdat

Senior Member
I can't say that the more I progress, the less gear matters.

I can say, however, that the more I progress, the less I blame the gear for shortcomings in my playing.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
I don’t mind playing house kits these days, but I do spend some time tuning and tweaking if its a long gig. I still prefer my own snare and at least one decent crash cymbal though.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I feel that as I got older/better etc, that the gear quality matters more...or more importantly, the quality of the sound. I don't buy into the "Great drummers can make crappy equipment sound great" thing...if Jeff Hamilton hits a Camber cymbal, it is still Camber cymbal....

I want my hardware to be strong and last a while.

Where I have become less "caring" is in events that happen at gigs etc.
Drop a stick during a song? Meh.
Guitar player shows up late? Meh.
Not enough room on stage for all of the stuff? Meh.
Set gets cut by a few songs? Meh.
Band X runs late? Meh

I used to stress out about everything at a gig, from how close we got to park to load in all the way to color and placement of the lights....now, all of that stuff that I have no control over just doesn't bother me at all any more. I think that all changed after my heart attack. I now stand on "this side" of that event, and watch bandmates go bonkers about the dumbest stuff. Man, I don't need that anymore!
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I feel like I'm pretty good at having the "right tools for the right job" sort of attitude. I don't like to buy just to buy, and have just to have. It what I own does not fulfill a specific purpose and I'm not actively using it, most of the time I get rid of it. It's a good place to be because I'm not tempted to go buy crap I don't need.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
I don't buy into the "Great drummers can make crappy equipment sound great" thing...if Jeff Hamilton hits a Camber cymbal, it is still Camber cymbal....
I've always felt this way too; same as with cruddy sounding drums. I do think that a great player can play in such a way that others maybe don't notice the bad sounding gear as much, or they can creatively make the sound of the object work as an advantage, i.e. find a way to make it conceptually entertaining beyond just playing well. But yeah, that Camber still ain't a vintage K.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I dunno guys, I've personally heard the difference between a very experienced player and a newer one on the same crappy kit... It's like night and day typically. The same would happen on a nice kit, but it does speak to the OP's point. As we get better and refine out touch and technique, you'll literally sound better and be more confident on anything. Early on we tend to be very dependent on having things exactly as we like them and are used to... As we get better we learn to roll with the punches and minimize the impact of crap gear.

Cymbals are probably the most important thing to not have crap of, though. I don't really know any drummers who don't use their own cymbals so for the purposes of this thread I'm mostly talking about garbage drums or weird/bad setups.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I dunno guys, I've personally heard the difference between a very experienced player and a newer one on the same crappy kit... It's like night and day typically. The same would happen on a nice kit, but it does speak to the OP's point. As we get better and refine out touch and technique, you'll literally sound better and be more confident on anything. Early on we tend to be very dependent on having things exactly as we like them and are used to... As we get better we learn to roll with the punches and minimize the impact of crap gear.

Cymbals are probably the most important thing to not have crap of, though. I don't really know any drummers who don't use their own cymbals so for the purposes of this thread I'm mostly talking about garbage drums or weird/bad setups.
I do think that drums are easier to manipulate than cymbals, and if you have been playing long enough, you can find some kind of sweet spot on a drum if you have been tuning for years... and definitely agree that you should not skimp on cymbals.
 
Top