The "Holy Grail" of cymbals?

gretsch-o-rama

Senior Member
This guy wants to sell to a collector, and collectors are the "insane clown posse" of drum buyers...I say that because I don't understand how anyone can justify spending thousands of dollars on one item...no matter how precious...and frankly, they drive up the market so that an average person like myself will never be able to own stuff like that...
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
This guy wants to sell to a collector, and collectors are the "insane clown posse" of drum buyers...I say that because I don't understand how anyone can justify spending thousands of dollars on one item...no matter how precious...and frankly, they drive up the market so that an average person like myself will never be able to own stuff like that...
All collectors are the "insane clown posse".?

Just because you don't understand something,dosen't give you the right, or free reign to demean and insult people that DO understand.

As far as driving up the price,we currently use a free market system,where the public decides how much to pay for an item,or what it's worth.....aside from collectors.

For your information,most collectable drum related drum and cymbal items,have,with little exception,been grossly DEVALUED,from where they were around ten years ago.

Some things naturally appreciate in value also,which has nothing what so ever to do with the "insane clown posse".

There are also a few forum members here who not only play vintage drums and cymbals,but collect them as well,such as our own Bermuda...a forum moderator.

If you want something bad enough,you'll pay whatever it takes to own that item.Nothing new there.........for centuries.

Steve B
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
The thing would have to sound pretty gongy at that size, wouldn't it?
Grea,those 60's Zildjians of unusual size,sound quite washy and dark,as oppose to gongy,because the're pretty thin,with little stick definition.

You also get quite a lot of "wobble" when playing them.You can play it for a while,leave the room,have dinner and watch a movie,come back,and it's still vibrateing.You can actually see,the edge moving up an down,almost 20mm

They do take some time to get going though.You have to move a lot of metal.I doubt I'd play anything over a 24.It's just too much work.:)

Steve B
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
Grea,those 60's Zildjians of unusual size,sound quite washy and dark,as oppose to gongy,because they're pretty thin, with little stick definition.

You also get quite a lot of "wobble" when playing them. You can play it for a while,leave the room,have dinner and watch a movie,come back,and it's still vibrating. You can actually see, the edge moving up an down,almost 20mm

They do take some time to get going though.You have to move a lot of metal.I doubt I'd play anything over a 24.It's just too much work.:)
Thanks Steve. You're a vintage gear ecyclopaedia. What you said reminded me of the slow motion video of Mike Mangini hitting a cymbal. I prefer not going over 20" for space.

I figured that a cymbal so large would be too washy as a ride if they were thin, hence your Maytag comment (had to Google it, I've not seen that brand here).

So that effectively makes it an effects cymbal. 5K for an effects cymbal. I imagine the seller's only hope is a collector trying to complete a series or type.
 

makinao

Silver Member
I knew a local sound/instrument contractor who had a vintage 30". AFAIK it was a Zildjian from Turkey. He brought it out and showed it to Ndugu Chancler when he came to town with Hubert Laws in the late 70s. He ended up playing it in the concert as his only ride.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
http://nh.craigslist.org/msg/3983820800.html

$6000 for that cymbal, or $1500 for this..

Poll, anyone? ;)
... and it includes "Zildjian cymbols" - what's going on with the education system!

I knew a local sound/instrument contractor who had a vintage 30". AFAIK it was a Zildjian from Turkey. He brought it out and showed it to Ndugu Chancler when he came to town with Hubert Laws in the late 70s. He ended up playing it in the concert as his only ride.
Do you know if it was thick, thin or medium?
 
I purchased my first new K 21inch in 1959 and use it most weekends for jazz and rock & roll. The sound is well balanced and a pleasure to use . jz.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
... and it includes "Zildjian cymbols" - what's going on with the education system!



Do you know if it was thick, thin or medium?
Grea...just a point of information.The truly accurate way to gauge the relative thickness of a cymbal of a certain model,and manufacturing process and diameter, is by actually weighing it,and using the cymbals weight in grams,to help you determine,heavy,medium,thin or paper thin.

Once you know the gram weight, then it will help you determine the relative thickness,in ratio to it's diameter.

Not all models,and makers thin crash for example ,will be the same thickness,and using gram weight will help you to gauge,just HOW thin is that thin crash.

If you take a Paiste 602 thin crash and an A Zildjian thin chash,the weight in grams may or may not be different,but most likely will be.

Steve B
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
There's no question Roberto built some innovative and just beautiful,and musical sounding cymbals,

His passing left a hole in the world of cymbalsmiths ,and music as a whole.

Steve B
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
If you take a Paiste 602 thin crash and an A Zildjian thin crash,the weight in grams may or may not be different,but most likely will be...
Yes Steve, you're correct, however, the Paiste 602 will be very consistent while the A Zildjian will vary widely in thickness and sound.

You really need to try a lot of Zildjian cymbals (same model) until you find one that fits your ears, while the Paiste will sound almost identical.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Henri..yes absolutely.Paiste seems to have extremely consistant cymbals in terms of sound and uniform thickness,so one 18" 602,thin crash,will pretty much sound like another 18" 602 thin. crash,with only a very slight variation.

I was in The Long Island Drum Center a few years back,which is a 5 star drum shop,and there was a "discussion" about Paiste consistancy,between an employee and a customer.

The discussion also involved the correct pronunciation of Paiste.

The employee,set up 4 Paiste 2002 18 " crashes,and it was almost like hitting the same cymbal.Subtle variation,but very consistant in sound.


Steve B
 

drummerman42

Senior Member
Thats a super cymbal, and for that price I think if he thinks its the HOLY GRAIL cymbal, he might as well keep it...
 
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