The Drum Tuning Bible

Ting_Thing

Junior Member
Hey. So I'm sure a lot of you have heard of the Drum Tuning Bible. http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/

It's an incredible wealth of information, and it's quite impressive that this is all from a single author. Lately, I've been studying that thing quite a bit. For those of you who have read it, is there any information in there which you might disagree with?
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
It's a very helpful collection of information, a must read for new drummers or anyone that's not great at tuning.

The only bit of information that I disagree with a little is how to get what he calls a "fat wet sound" for the snare. He suggests detuning the reso head to get a fatter snare sound; which really does work. Apparently that's how you get a big chunky 80's rock sound. From my experience though this really reduces the snare's sensitivity which is not an issue for slow rock but there's zero rebound for more intricate snare work.

I've found that detuning the batter head a bit works much better.
 

moontheloon

Silver Member
It's a very helpful collection of information, a must read for new drummers or anyone that's not great at tuning.

The only bit of information that I disagree with a little is how to get what he calls a "fat wet sound" for the snare. He suggests detuning the reso head to get a fatter snare sound; which really does work. Apparently that's how you get a big chunky 80's rock sound. From my experience though this really reduces the snare's sensitivity which is not an issue for slow rock but there's zero rebound for more intricate snare work.

I've found that detuning the batter head a bit works much better.
Ive done recording sessions where they wanted that fat old 70s type snare sound......and Im not a fan of loosening and tightening my heads so I took an old record....a 12" vinyl and put it on the snare drum......and it sounds amazing on the recording ......like a big fat loose gated 70s snare drum......sweet little trick
 

jodgey4

Silver Member
The bearing edges sections are IMHO a bit off, but they get the point across. The reason 30 or 45 degree cuts sound different is because the 30 leaves more meat on the shell near the edge for better absorption of energy.
"A 35-degree cut allows greater contact thus a drier sound vs. a 45..." It doesn't allow greater contact area, you can make the tip/ contact area the same as a 45, but it does leave more wood on the shell near the all important edge



But still, that's pretty minor and open to everyone's debate. If you don't believe me, go to the GhostNote forums!
Another thing to point out if I'm being picky is that the build of the shell (ply (more vs. less), stave, segment, solid, steambent) has a huge impact, as well as direction of the grain.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7v95pAaUnE

Great source, indeed!
 
Hey. So I'm sure a lot of you have heard of the Drum Tuning Bible. http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/

It's an incredible wealth of information, and it's quite impressive that this is all from a single author. Lately, I've been studying that thing quite a bit. For those of you who have read it, is there any information in there which you might disagree with?
That old link to the drum tuning bible is broken but I have hosted a copy of it here.

http://circularscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Drum-tuning-bible.pdf

John Roberts
 
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