The dreaded drumshare.

spireblade

Junior Member
I am getting rather pissed off at support bands turning up and expecting to use my kit. My standard answer is no, to which I am then the bad guy!
Ever since I allowed one person to use my kit, and causing £80 damage to my new set of heads I have refused. They quickly vacated the premises before I could catch up and demand they pay for the damage. I am not fortunate enough to be endorsed therefore I pay for my equipment. I play a 70's Gretsch USA and keep it as pristine as I possibly can.
Is it just me? Am I being unreasonable here? I wouldn't dare turn up to a gig without my kit, or expecting to use someone elses.
 

TTNW

Pioneer Member
Is it just me? Am I being unreasonable here?
I don't think so. I wouldn't get mad about it though. If you want to avoid the whole "I'm the bad guy" vibe, just tell someone when they ask that you're playing a borrowed kit and were told not to let anyone else play it. Nothing you can do.
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
Your kit, your rules.

The only time it gets annoying is if you don't allow small adjustments to the set up. Such as Snare height.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
I am getting rather pissed off at support bands turning up and expecting to use my kit. My standard answer is no, to which I am then the bad guy!
Ever since I allowed one person to use my kit, and causing £80 damage to my new set of heads I have refused. They quickly vacated the premises before I could catch up and demand they pay for the damage. I am not fortunate enough to be endorsed therefore I pay for my equipment. I play a 70's Gretsch USA and keep it as pristine as I possibly can.
Is it just me? Am I being unreasonable here? I wouldn't dare turn up to a gig without my kit, or expecting to use someone elses.
Welcome to the forum!
Just turning up, and expecting to use someone else's gear is a new one to me. It's kind of stupid really.
If they show up with no gear, and it's not booked as a "back line" show, I guess they don't play.
I wouldn't feel bad, or let anyone make you feel bad about saying NO and sticking to it.

I mean, I guess then a guitar player shouldn't be upset about someone spilling stuff all over, and into their nice tube amp and blowing it up then either right??....
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
Can drumshare work? Sure it can if it's arranged ahead of time.

I'm actually playing a gig tonight where I am using the drummer's kit that comes on after us. We have been in correspondence with each other, and though we have never met in person, this person could not be more accommodating. Saves everyone time.

I'm bringing in my snare, pedal, stool and cymbals - the rest is his. He doesn't know this yet, but I'm showing up when he's scheduled to arrive so I can help him carry his stuff in from his car. Since it's about 8 degrees outside, it's the least I could do.

This is not the first time I've been involved in drumshare gigs. People have used my stuff endlessly and never once have I experienced an issue.
 

boltzmann's brain

Senior Member
Am I being unreasonable here?.
you are absolutely NOT being unreasonable. nobody touches my drums but me. i've been made to be the bad guy on occasion- i don't care. i had the same exact situation many thousands of years ago. the band's former drummer showed up at a gig, the leader begged me to let him sit in- ONE SONG. i went to the bathroom, i came back to dented heads, and cymbals at all angles. the guy was a Visigoth. never again. you have every right, as do all of us.
 

NUTHA JASON

Senior Administrator
I am getting rather pissed off at support bands turning up and expecting to use my kit. My standard answer is no, to which I am then the bad guy!
Ever since I allowed one person to use my kit, and causing £80 damage to my new set of heads I have refused. They quickly vacated the premises before I could catch up and demand they pay for the damage. I am not fortunate enough to be endorsed therefore I pay for my equipment. I play a 70's Gretsch USA and keep it as pristine as I possibly can.
Is it just me? Am I being unreasonable here? I wouldn't dare turn up to a gig without my kit, or expecting to use someone elses.
pre-empt it man. if you know you are the headline act get in touch with the support bands and lay down your terms. regardless of if those are terms are yes you can use my shell kit or no you can't, you are being totally reasonable if you give them notice. and being unreasonable if the show is about to start.
having said that, regardless of if i'm supporting or headlining a shared gig i will always bring the kit question up a few days before so that i knoww what is going on.
 

bobacwrd

Senior Member
I am getting rather pissed off at support bands turning up and expecting to use my kit. My standard answer is no, to which I am then the bad guy!
Ever since I allowed one person to use my kit, and causing £80 damage to my new set of heads I have refused. They quickly vacated the premises before I could catch up and demand they pay for the damage. I am not fortunate enough to be endorsed therefore I pay for my equipment. I play a 70's Gretsch USA and keep it as pristine as I possibly can.
Is it just me? Am I being unreasonable here? I wouldn't dare turn up to a gig without my kit, or expecting to use someone elses.
There has been countelss entries on this blog for this very same subject. I too am with you. I don't like lending my gear out. Below is a reply I made on this very subject back a couple of years ago. Have a read. It probably sums up the same feelings most have in regrads to lending or sharing their kit or gear at a gig....

From Drummerworld 2009:
Look, we all have choices we make in life. And most everyone if not everyone here on this forum is a drummer. You know when you picked up the instrument, that there were issues regarding the amount of gear that needs to be transported and how long it takes to set it up. If you don't, then check your ears for shit because your heads up your ass. Just because the drums are a cumbersome instrument doesn't in anyway make someone obligated to have to share their equipment. There isn't a responsibility here to provide another musician with your gear. If there is an understanding before hand or if you are one of those who don't mind lending or supplying gear that's your choice and if it makes you feel all warm and fuzzy inside, I'm glad it gets you moist. But I think there are more than a few on this post that can attest to having something broken, stolen, missplaced, whatever, after lending their gear to others. Sure, when someone approaches you to borrow your gear they seem very cool at first, and all that, but wait till something gets broken, bent or misaligned and you inquire about it, see what happens then. Try collecting money for damages. Fat chance. Not to mention the time and pain you have to go through getting a replacement. Heaven forbid it is a one of a kind. Sure someone will say "what are you doing bringing one of a kind item to a gig anyway", but I shouldn't have to compromise what I choose to use at a gig because somebody else may think I'm obligated to lend it to them becasue they chose to play the drums and it being such a problem instrument to lug around so I'll just borrow someone elses. I say go pound sand.
 

B-squared

Silver Member
Welcome to the forum! The suggestions here are good, but I have another idea.

You need to look at the "Tom Angles" thread. The drum brands and set-ups there are perfect for this sort of thing. You can find many like them on Craigslist for $50 to $100. It would be worth the investment to leave a set-up like that on stage for bands who don't bring a kit with them. You can use super glue to keep them in that "Tom Angles" set-up. Make sure you have a video cam to tape the results! :)
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Sure, I'll share mine...

..if the person puts up a refundable deposit for the total value of equipment and pays a steep rental fee.

I'm not above making money.
 
T

The Old Hyde

Guest
I wouldnt let my drums be played without notice. last weekend we played a gig and all the bands were required to bring their owns drums. no problem. this saturday we are hosting an open mic and my kit is part of the back line so i let people play it. I am bringing my Ludwigs I just restored and am a little nervous this time. I dont want to bring another kit because i personally want to play these drums. Its just me but i wouldnt supply a kit that I wouldnt like to play on.
 

NerfLad

Silver Member
Once I had a guy say to me "Hey, do you mind if I use your cymbals? All of mine broke." I respectfully declined.
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
..."Tom Angles" thread...leave a set-up like that on stage for bands who don't bring a kit with them. You can use super glue to keep them in that "Tom Angles" set-up. Make sure you have a video cam to tape the results! :)
Oh man, I love that idea!
 

Zero Mercury Drummer

Senior Member
In my experience, few drummers would share kits if given the choice.
This decision/request seems to commonly originate from the soundman or bar owner.

It's always awkward when the soundman demands you share a kit, and the headliner drummer gets all pissed off because you want to use it. I always let people use my kit, and have suffered some dented heads, but no biggie.
 

larryz

Platinum Member
Here you go. You won't mind leaving this on stage for the next band. A youtube classic is sure to follow.
Hey that's decent lacquer job there, eh? Not bad :)

I'm too much of a nice a guy and I would probably trust someone to play my kit. Once I let a kid half my age play my 1960s Ludwigs but only because he seemed like a nice person. He was respectful adn treated them well. Actually kinda cool hearing what a kid could do with them. I see your point though and agree.
 

BacteriumFendYoke

Platinum Member
Let me put it this way.

If you played a Grand Piano, you wouldn't expect to have to cart your Piano from home every time you wanted to play. One would be provided.

I put drums in the same bracket. I fully expect to share my kit and borrow other peoples' kits at gigs. In fact, the next gig I play will have just this situation (I'm borrowing) but it's been discussed three weeks in advance, with the caveat that I bring what I need, i.e. things that could be broken and on the understanding that any damage will be paid for. I'm fine with that. I've leant my own kit out on a number of occasions and the rules are very clear - I let the promoter know in advance what my rules are on the understanding that if there are any issues, he or she can get in touch with the band.

I'm not sure why it's such a big issue for so many people. If you're complaining about borrowing someone elses' kit, or lending your own out, I have to question just how many gigs you've done in your time behind the kit. I'm not sure about the USA but in the UK it's absolutely the norm. Small stages, limited time and limited patience from sound engineers to sound check multiple kits. It's unnecessary hassle for everyone. If you are really anal about your setup just learn to $%#^ing play and it won't be an issue. Take all your 'personal' items (snare, cymbals, sticks, pedals), adjust what you can and if necessary strip back your arrangements if you can't play every note.

The important thing is to be flexible but have defined boundaries. I'm happy to play most kits (and I've played all sorts, believe me) and I respect the rules. If somebody uses my kit, I expect the same basic courtesy and make it clear on first contact. Negotiation isn't hard unless you have some real issues.
 

spireblade

Junior Member
Thankyou for your replies, each and every one taken on board.

Most of the time we don't even know that there will be a support band until we get to the gig, they are few and far between. The only people I let touch my gear are people I know well. I shall stick to my guns and respectfully decline a request, without being an arse about it. Most seem to agree with me when I give my reasons.

Once again, thanks for welcoming me to the forum

Wayne
 
Top