The Charley Wilcoxon Challenge

BrandonGoodwin

Junior Member
I wrote this blog post and made a Youtube video about why I think that Charley Wilcoxon was such a genius snare drum composer.

Charley Wilcoxon is my absolute favourite snare drum composer, and is a favourite of drummers worldwide. Today I wanted to talk about why I appreciate the work that Charley Wilcoxon put into the art of drumming and how much he has inspired me.

Click the link below to watch the video I posted

https://www.studiodrummontreal.com/blog/blog/the-charley-wilcoxon-challenge
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
AAD had been a big part of my practice for years.

It's not been just a snare book to me, though. It's a collection of ideas and exercises that I practice both right and left handed and expand on in my own way.

These days I work a lot of conditioning on my moongel pad, multiple moogles infact to practice movement, AAD and Sticking Patterns are right there on the stand in front of me. Transfers to the kit really well.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Nice playing on Wilcoxon #1.

Odd-Arne has been recommending Wilcoxon for some time.

Is AAD: 150 Rudimental Solos the book to start with? Is it available digitally? All of my practice material is on my iPad, and I'm reluctant to go back to paper.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I should mention I have one copy in my backpack, one in my car and one on a notestand in each of the 4 different places I regularly find myself practicing. 😄
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Is AAD: 150 Rudimental Solos the book to start with? Is it available digitally? All of my practice material is on my iPad, and I'm reluctant to go back to paper.
I dont think it's available digitally, but you could easily scan a few pieces yourself.

ADD and New Breed were basically the first books I got recommended to get by my first teachers.

I think ADD is a great book. It puts rudimental practice in context.

As far as I understand it's just a collection of studies Charley wote for his students.


If the point is to get into traditional rudimental stuff the NARD book is a better plave to start, I guess.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
The Stone Stick Control, Wilcoxin 150 solos, and Pratt book were my first three, given to me by my dad, so they are all at least from the early 60's. The Wilcoxin was my most favorite, and I still use all 3 with my current students. They refer to them as "the Grey book" ; "the black and white book with the shield" and "the pink book with the serious looking drum dude on it"

classic
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I dont think it's available digitally, but you could easily scan a few pieces yourself.

ADD and New Breed were basically the first books I got recommended to get by my first teachers.

I think ADD is a great book. It puts rudimental practice in context.

As far as I understand it's just a collection of studies Charley wote for his students.


If the point is to get into traditional rudimental stuff the NARD book is a better plave to start, I guess.
Yeah, I'm going to buy it and scan it. I think I had mentioned awhile ago that I was going to pick it up on your recommendation, but I wanted to finish up something else first (a book on learning the 40PAS rudiments and its 14 musical exercises). I took a look at some of the AAD solos on google, and they seem to be what I'm looking for - something between isolated rudiments and full-on solos, but a little more than just check patterns and one or two bar phrases.

I'm not familiar with the NARD book. How does it compare to AAD?
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
Nice to see this thread going.

I have always loved doing Wilcoxon (and Pratt) solos. Began using them around 1980 and to this very day I continue to use Wilcoxon's 150 Rudimental Solos, Advanced Swing Solos and Pratt's 14 Modern Contest Solos. There are endless ideas that can be incorporated with them.

When I taught out of them (no longer teach), I found them to be indispensable for teaching concepts on how to get around a set of drums, fill ideas, 4 -8-12-16 bar phrasing and numerous coordination ideas.

Does anyone have any favorites or care to share how you work with them?
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Yeah, I'm going to buy it and scan it. I think I had mentioned awhile ago that I was going to pick it up on your recommendation, but I wanted to finish up something else first (a book on learning the 40PAS rudiments and its 14 musical exercises). I took a look at some of the AAD solos on google, and they seem to be what I'm looking for - something between isolated rudiments and full-on solos, but a little more than just check patterns and one or two bar phrases.

I'm not familiar with the NARD book. How does it compare to AAD?

The N.A.R.D. book is more actual solos and it has no stickings written. I saw Tommy Igoe showing how to play the two first ones on his FB page recently for anyone who needs help getting started.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
Nice to see this thread going...Does anyone have any favorites or care to share how you work with them?
I use AAD a lot for technique - a favorite way to play the solos is at a slow tempo with exaggerated stick heights. I get more from working with musical solos vs. repetitive drills and these solos really help with touch and control. I have a bunch memorized and try to add a new one every once in a while...

I play solos on the pad, but try to get on a snare drum as much as possible. When I'm on the kit I keep some sort of foot ostinato; hi hat on upbeats, 1/4 note bass drum, hi hat on downbeats, hi hat splash, hi hat chick, etc. No 136 is one of my favorites because of the shifting time signatures - I keep my foot pattern the same throughout.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I use AAD a lot for technique - a favorite way to play the solos is at a slow tempo with exaggerated stick heights. I get more from working with musical solos vs. repetitive drills and these solos really help with touch and control. I have a bunch memorized and try to add a new one every once in a while...

I play solos on the pad, but try to get on a snare drum as much as possible. When I'm on the kit I keep some sort of foot ostinato; hi hat on upbeats, 1/4 note bass drum, hi hat on downbeats, hi hat splash, hi hat chick, etc. No 136 is one of my favorites because of the shifting time signatures - I keep my foot pattern the same throughout.
I totally agree, these really can/do help with touch and control. Like yourself, I apply a handful of different bass/hi-hat combo's underneath.
I also find voicing the accents around the set really help to bring life to them.

Breaking them up into 4 or 8 bar phrases within some kind of groove is also neat. Certainly extends the solo a bunch but adds to the variety.

I've recorded a bunch of these over the years for students and have thought about putting them out there on YT for others to (perhaps) get ideas from. Perhaps some day.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
It's just a staple and it comes into play whenever it's about refining things.

As technical etudes they've come back into play when I started play them leading with the left and also with my focus on matched grip the last few years. I've changed pads around a lot, but I feel working on the Moongel pad now kicks it up a notch now, a bit like playing with brushes, but different. In any case, it has great effect as long as the focus is on playing clean. It translates to the kit with no issue, which is great.

Other than that I just get ideas from it. I may play it on the kit and move things around like the accents mentioned. I also get new ideas I haven't thought of that I can through the accent sheet or a reading text. You can expand that a lot, but I try to keep it practical.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
I’d already made up my mind to buy AAD, but reading the rest of these replies has me stoked. I’m ordering a copy tomorrow.

I practised exclusively on the RTOM Moongel pad for almost a year a couple of years ago. Is it worth going back to again?
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I practised exclusively on the RTOM Moongel pad for almost a year a couple of years ago. Is it worth going back to again?
I've been going prety Moongel heavy lately. I'll be getting even more as they're so easy to trasnport and oter pad also sit pretty secureøy on top of them. The ability to practice movement anywhere without making things complicated is great. This way it's modular too, so I can bring as many or as few as I want.






It's stll a workout pad, though. It won't replace my Xymox for finer work. The Xymox is articulate, feels good, makes you work just a tiny bit harder amd it hurts you if your grip is too stiff.

They're a good combo. Although I have many others, with an additional pad for brushes, the Xymox and Moongel really do cover things for me.

I use the Reflexx a bit, but it doesn't feel all tha great to me. It's very quiet and it serves a purpose for my left hand matched grip until that gets a bit better.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I've been going prety Moongel heavy lately. I'll be getting even more as they're so easy to trasnport and oter pad also sit pretty secureøy on top of them. The ability to practice movement anywhere without making things complicated is great. This way it's modular too, so I can bring as many or as few as I want.

It's stll a workout pad, though. It won't replace my Xymox for finer work. The Xymox is articulate, feels good, makes you work just a tiny bit harder amd it hurts you if your grip is too stiff.

They're a good combo. Although I have many others, with an additional pad for brushes, the Xymox and Moongel really do cover things for me.

I use the Reflexx a bit, but it doesn't feel all tha great to me. It's very quiet and it serves a purpose for my left hand matched grip until that gets a bit better.
I also incorporate the L80's into one of my setups when I want or need to keep things much quieter than I play. Don't have quite the elaborate pad setup you have (or electronics), I just use the remo silentstroke heads.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
I also incorporate the L80's into one of my setups when I want or need to keep things much quieter than I play. Don't have quite the elaborate pad setup you have (or electronics), I just use the remo silentstroke heads.
Yeah. I used to have a house where I could practice at any time, day or night. I was either there or at work where I also could practice at any time.

When my situation changed with rooms I couldn't always use, had to keep it down or as I'm also on the go half the time, I had to start looking into ways to compensate a bit.

Those Moongles I can obviously take with me anywhere with no hassle. If I bring 2 or 3 I can also easily move them around to any location in seconds, so I can in essence set up anywhere, put up a tent, rent a cabin, hotel room etc... and be practicing movement around the kit in minutes.

The Moongel and Futz pic is just from a small place I'm renting where I work 3 days a week right now. Practice ends up being after work and late at night, so I try to keep it down. It's very temporary as I really can't stand working there. The old narc boss and depressed working environment thing. Seen enough of that, so looking for other options.

Changes all the time.

 
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beatdat

Senior Member
So I downloaded a .pdf of AAD. The notation is a little dated, but I'm looking forward to diving into it.

Are there any in particular that teachers recommend students to start with, or should I just start at the beginning?
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
That's a good way to put it. I'm glad this thread popped back up. I pulled this book out after not seeing it in about 15 years. I no longer keep a kit in my office, but I do keep my Prologix Blue Lighting pad on a stand under my desk for when I feel like taking a break.
I think ADD is a great book. It puts rudimental practice in context.
 
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