The birth of heavy metal

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
I could be wrong here but I think the basic pentatonic minor scale doesn't have the flat second added to it. It's still practically the same blues scale. I use that scale a lot and the tritones are great for pull-offs, hammer-ons and bends. A lot of Heavy Metal riffs are built around those added tritones. Electric Funeral is a great example of this.
But having a tritone interval in the blues scale isn't the same as having it in a chord.
You don't usually play all notes of a scale at the same time.

No the basic pentatonic only has 5 notes (hence the name...).
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
I could be wrong here but I think the basic pentatonic minor scale doesn't have the flat second added to it. It's still practically the same blues scale. I use that scale a lot and the tritones are great for pull-offs, hammer-ons and bends. A lot of Heavy Metal riffs are built around those added tritones. Electric Funeral is a great example of this.
If it's not just an accidental, the flat second appears in the Phrygian and Locrian modes of the major scale, the mode on the fifth of the harmonic minor scale, and the chromatic scale (obviously).
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
If it's not just an accidental, the flat second appears in the Phrygian and Locrian modes of the major scale, the mode on the fifth of the harmonic minor scale, and the chromatic scale (obviously).
Yes, I don't know enough to even pretend to have this conversation. I only know the simple basics. You may as well be speaking French to me.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
If it's not just an accidental, the flat second appears in the Phrygian and Locrian modes of the major scale, the mode on the fifth of the harmonic minor scale, and the chromatic scale (obviously).
and on the fifth of the harmonic major scale :). (if it's called that way in English)
and in (I think it's called that way in English) Superlocrian (altered scale).
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I think you'll find a Babelfish more effective than Google translate, Polly!
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Duncan, the fish look kind of slimy and icky :)

I just tried a reverse translation - love the way these things translate "scholar" to "school boy" ... sexism anyway?
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Duncan, the fish look kind of slimy and icky :)

I just tried a reverse translation - love the way these things translate "scholar" to "school boy" ... sexism anyway?
There was something I remember from a TV show called 'QI' about when somebody decided to translate Robert Burns' 'Ode to a Haggis' into German and back into English (arguably). It ended up saying something like 'behold the king of the sausage people'. Brilliant.
 

Muckster

Platinum Member
Hmmmmm.....from those choices i would have to go with Black Sabbath. I haven't read through the whole post.

I would also argue that Judas Priest would be the true so called "first" heavy metal band being that Priest was the first to exclude any "blues" influence in their material as far as i know. My opinion.
 

Aeolian

Platinum Member
Not really into metal so hadn't looked at this thread. Back in the '60s transition from psychedelic to "heavy" rock I thought the metal term was derived from folks like Zep and Iron Butterfly who had metals in their names, and to distinguish this new heavier sound from the more abstract psychedelic folk/rock of the SF bands.

I can't remember the exact timeline, but I remember going to a Steppenwolf concert that Blue Cheer was supposed to be on the bill for. There was no bass player. It was just the guitarist and drummer, and 16 Sunn powered speaker cabinets with 2-15" JBLs on stage. They called that band Lucifer and it was both loud and heavy.

When Sabbath came out I took it as an extension of the dark gothic vibe that others had played with. Kind of a "theme" band. Everyone from Arthur Brown to the Doors had explored dark themes, but here was an entire album wrapped around it. Not sure how you get from dark gothic to "metal" but hey, what's in a name.
 

Bretton

Silver Member
Or simply remind him that Bonham was wayyy more influential that he was!

Maybe it's just my ears, but I don't hear an ounce of metal in Led Zeppelin, who were fundamentally a blues band. To me, metal (classical) and blues are oil and water. Are these two mutually exclusive in anyone else's mind?
I definitely hear metal in Babe I'm Gonna Leave You.

how's this for a mashup of Classical and Metal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjKyzwqIT7s
 
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