The Beatles - Get Back Documentary

GretschedHive

Silver Member
I love music documentaries, music history, and I really like the Beatles.

But I got 3/4 the way through Ep 1 and had to stop.

I mean, I've been in band rehearsal, I've done the sitting around trying to come up with ideas for songs. It's fun to do, but boring to watch.
I totally get where you're coming from. I found the first episode by far the least enjoyable to watch, due to a combination of the tension and the monotony. I still liked it, but it was nowhere near as enjoyable as the subsequent episodes.
 

STAXfan

Junior Member
Everybody always presumed Ringo was all A Zildjian, but he played Zilco and Zyn cymbals, some Paiste 602 (seen in the clips), and actually only one cymbal is a Zildjian A...the 18.
And Ringo has always said that he still has his original cymbals that he used with The Beatles. Ringo is a great drummer but just like Charlie Watts he doesn't seem interested in talking in any kind of depth about his kits. Does anyone know if he collected drums an cymbals. I know one had been auctioned off. I think he had either 4 or 5 of the Ludwig black oyster pearl kits. I think
he still has that maple with natural finish kit. Does anyone know how he acquired that kit? And why on earth he used a double tom stand instead of the tom mount? That stand was in front of the bass drum and I don't know how he could reach the toms. I do think it's cool that he used his Ludwig Jazz Festival BOP snare even though he was offered a Supraphoic. On "Let It Be" his drums sound okay buy not great. Same as his floor tom because they had those damn tea towels on them. I think on Abby Road his got the calfskin heads and didn't use muffling except for his BLP Jazz Fest.


I'm interested to know if anyone else got the reissue of the Jazz Fest when thy came out two years ago. I got two. One the was BOP because of Ringo and the great history of that snare. I also to a Sky Blue Pearl Jazz Fest because I have a Sky Blue Bear. I love those snares. They are easy to tune and actually have a much deeper sound than than any 51/2 X 14. It can sound really crisp as well. I play it tuned about medium because I like that deeper sound.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
And why on earth he used a double tom stand instead of the tom mount? That stand was in front of the bass drum and I don't know how he could reach the toms.

I thought the same but it was pointed out to me Ringo sat very high in the kit, his snare quite forward and thus toms out forward over the BD, compared other setups.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I thought the same but it was pointed out to me Ringo sat very high in the kit, his snare quite forward and thus toms out forward over the BD, compared other setups.
IN addition

Ringo is left-handed, even though he plays a right-handed kit.

Ringo himself has often said doing a roll from the small tom to the floor tom is not his thing because of his left-handedness.

Though I agree Ringo has never been a gear head like many of us on here are.
 

ricky

Senior Member
And Ringo has always said that he still has his original cymbals that he used with The Beatles. Ringo is a great drummer but just like Charlie Watts he doesn't seem interested in talking in any kind of depth about his kits. Does anyone know if he collected drums an cymbals. I know one had been auctioned off. I think he had either 4 or 5 of the Ludwig black oyster pearl kits. I think
he still has that maple with natural finish kit. Does anyone know how he acquired that kit? And why on earth he used a double tom stand instead of the tom mount? That stand was in front of the bass drum and I don't know how he could reach the toms. I do think it's cool that he used his Ludwig Jazz Festival BOP snare even though he was offered a Supraphoic. On "Let It Be" his drums sound okay buy not great. Same as his floor tom because they had those damn tea towels on them. I think on Abby Road his got the calfskin heads and didn't use muffling except for his BLP Jazz Fest.


I'm interested to know if anyone else got the reissue of the Jazz Fest when thy came out two years ago. I got two. One the was BOP because of Ringo and the great history of that snare. I also to a Sky Blue Pearl Jazz Fest because I have a Sky Blue Bear. I love those snares. They are easy to tune and actually have a much deeper sound than than any 51/2 X 14. It can sound really crisp as well. I play it tuned about medium because I like that deeper sound.
Here's a site on Ringo's kits:


He did do some tea towels on Abbey Road...Come Together and some others, maybe Here Comes The Sun King.
 
Finally watched it. After 6.5 hours of build up (with scenes of Yoko screaming in each of the three episodes), it was a tremendous letdown that the songs they performed on the roof were interrupted by man-in-the-street interviews during the actual songs.

Journalist to person in street: Do you know who's playing right now?
Person in street: Given that it's 1969, we're standing in front of Apple HQ and I can hear, I'm guessing it's the Beatles.
 

JimmyM

Gold Member
Finally watched it. After 6.5 hours of build up (with scenes of Yoko screaming in each of the three episodes), it was a tremendous letdown that the songs they performed on the roof were interrupted by man-in-the-street interviews during the actual songs.

Journalist to person in street: Do you know who's playing right now?
Person in street: Given that it's 1969, we're standing in front of Apple HQ and I can hear, I'm guessing it's the Beatles.
Ya, that sucked. But if you want to get ambitious, you can at least find those performances all over the place on WAV files and sync them to the video :D
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Ok, I'm biting. Only because I spent a year playing "I Saw Her Standing There" in the late 90s.

Don't expect anything from me until at least a week out. 8 hrs of material is about as long as the 1977 four part series "Jesus of Nazareth".
 

Suburbankidz

Active Member
Enjoyed watching this documentary and also the people watching. Very impressed with the patient example of drummer professionalism from Ringo.

Yoko Ono's silent presence was fascinating from a sociological viewpoint. Has anyone else read the December 8th article from the New York Times, entitled, "The Sublime Spectacle of Yoko Ono disrupting the Beatles" which cited her previous performance art. (Unfortunately I think you need to have a subscription to the newspaper to read the article, but if you can access it, I thought it was interesting as l had a similar feeling).
 

ricky

Senior Member
Enjoyed watching this documentary and also the people watching. Very impressed with the patient example of drummer professionalism from Ringo.

Yoko Ono's silent presence was fascinating from a sociological viewpoint. Has anyone else read the December 8th article from the New York Times, entitled, "The Sublime Spectacle of Yoko Ono disrupting the Beatles" which cited her previous performance art. (Unfortunately I think you need to have a subscription to the newspaper to read the article, but if you can access it, I thought it was interesting as l had a similar feeling).
The thing I don't get about people saying that Yoko disrupted The Beatles (still, after all these years)...is that it wasn't really Yoko...it was John. John is the guy who wanted her there, next to him, the whole time. And John's the guy that finally broke up the band.
 

Mr Farkle

Well-known Member
Very impressed with the patient example of drummer professionalism from Ringo
The patience of Job as my mother would say. He waits and waits while the others joke around and work through the tune. When he finally gets to play he occasionally lays down some now famous riff.
 

River19

Senior Member
The patience of Job as my mother would say. He waits and waits while the others joke around and work through the tune. When he finally gets to play he occasionally lays down some now famous riff.
Thinking some of the Devil's Lettuce and wine helped him sit for those periods as well...... but yes, would sit there while the others acted like 12yos for a bit, then once something sounded like a song he would drop a drum part that fit perfectly or at least 80% right out of the gate....
 

ricky

Senior Member
To be fair to those other 3 clowns, they would direct Ringo quite a bit (whether it's the Get Back riff, or the latin beat in the Don't Let Me Down bridge, etc...Paul often the annoying one, but those other 2 clowns also telling Ringo what to do).

Ringo was the perfect rock and roll drummer...amiable, patient, solid, funny, and with a style all his own, working his limitations to perfection.
 

River19

Senior Member
To be fair to those other 3 clowns, they would direct Ringo quite a bit (whether it's the Get Back riff, or the latin beat in the Don't Let Me Down bridge, etc...Paul often the annoying one, but those other 2 clowns also telling Ringo what to do).

Ringo was the perfect rock and roll drummer...amiable, patient, solid, funny, and with a style all his own, working his limitations to perfection.
It's interesting, I'm 46 now and clearly came into music after Ringo with my initial heros being Bonham et al BUT as I had to learn a plethora of Beatles tunes when I was playing in a wedding band, I always thought "These parts are more creative than I anticipated".........after watching this documentary and the benefit of being 46 and not 26 I think what I was feeling was the fact Ringo was basically on the cutting edge of "inventing" Rock n Roll drumming and didn't have the 40 years of 2 & 4 we have all been programmed to hear and feel. The "Money beat" to him was probably a swung pattern of some type. Hence his creativity.......he wasn't pre-programmed to try and fit a 2&4 "money beat" to every developing song.

How many of us have been in a band "writing" session where the guitars and bass are trying to work their parts out and we instinctively start quietly playing a "Money beat" to anchor them and help form a full concept? Ringo didn't have that mentality......he was 10-20 years ahead of that mentality......
 

Rhythm666

Active Member
Not a beatle fan at all but i like these kind of docs but i got borred, for me they could have summed all up in a 3 hour docu
 
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