The bashing impulse

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Chunky, if you want to be jealous I could always tell you about the first time I saw Midnight Oil's Robbie Hirst playing ... verra verra nice from this side of the fence ... I can understand why guys would want to project that image haha.

When this loungey band I've been in for the last few years was first forming, I was already preparing my "sorry, not my thing" speech for my pal, Glenn (singer). But I chickened out and figured "oh well".

Now it's grown on me. It gave me a chance to learn to play quietly because I've been keen on jazz for a long time ... it's still difficult for me.

Added bonuses are:

- I only need a small kit, which reduces lugging
- I could finish gigs and rehearsals with just a little bit of sweat, or none in cold weather (as opposed to looking like I'd been swimming)
- my ears don't squeal after playing.

I don't play the music authentically because most drummers in the genre are jazz trained but there are ways of applying the simplicity and rawness of rock to chilled music.

So, when your body and ears need a break, there are fun options ... and your ankle flagellation approach will put you in good stead :)
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Thing is, the string players don't have to crank to 11 or use their full 200 watts.

It seems that a drummer's pain, body damage, ear damage and equipment costs for wear and tear are a small price to pay for natural distortion (not a mere fuzz box), a wall of sound and the feeling of throbbing bass in their gut.

It's pretty ruthless.
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
This reminds me of the recent Gigantour concert I saw.

Mikkey Dee Flailing his arms all over the place creating a wall of "CSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH"

In contrast Shawn Drover looked cool and calm behind the kit as well as looking like he was barely putting any effort into his played. yet he still had a sound presence.
 

topgun2021

Gold Member
Am I too old or just out of touch? What the heck is CSH?
It is an onomatopoeia that represents the sound that Mikkey Dee created when motorhead was on stage.

I basically could not decipher mush besides snare drum hits when he was playing a groove. Everything else was a wall of sound.
 

Chunky

Silver Member
Chunky, if you want to be jealous I could always tell you about the first time I saw Midnight Oil's Robbie Hirst playing ... verra verra nice from this side of the fence ... I can understand why guys would want to project that image haha.

When this loungey band I've been in for the last few years was first forming, I was already preparing my "sorry, not my thing" speech for my pal, Glenn (singer). But I chickened out and figured "oh well".

Now it's grown on me. It gave me a chance to learn to play quietly because I've been keen on jazz for a long time ... it's still difficult for me.

Added bonuses are:

- I only need a small kit, which reduces lugging
- I could finish gigs and rehearsals with just a little bit of sweat, or none in cold weather (as opposed to looking like I'd been swimming)
- my ears don't squeal after playing.

I don't play the music authentically because most drummers in the genre are jazz trained but there are ways of applying the simplicity and rawness of rock to chilled music.

So, when your body and ears need a break, there are fun options ... and your ankle flagellation approach will put you in good stead :)
Yep! That's the kind of image I strive for. I want to be Arnold Schwarzenegger on drums! lol. I eat high protein everything, always and train my damn ass off. I must say when I'm at me peak (usually end if summer every year) I fatigue easier behind the kit so it's a bit silly really.

Can't help it, I grew up watching 80's action movies! Real men, roooaaaar!

And yeah this volume situation is just a simple turn of a knob for guitarist but it's pretty damn expensive for us drummers!
Next time I break a piece of kit because of a twitchy guitarist I might wrap their guitar around their head, see how they like broken gear!

Or buy a mic and just beatbox... badly...
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
This reminds me of the recent Gigantour concert I saw.

Mikkey Dee Flailing his arms all over the place creating a wall of "CSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH"

In contrast Shawn Drover looked cool and calm behind the kit as well as looking like he was barely putting any effort into his played. yet he still had a sound presence.
Funny. When I saw Drover w/ Megadeth (and in video clips since then) I thought he lacked power.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
It always makes me laufh when I hear people refer to loud or metal drumming as 'bashing' as if it's less skilled than playing normal to quiet. It anything it's harder.
Rattle through my rudiments and grooves down to really low levels but it's not quite as easy to blast rudiments at full belt and that's what does hold alot of metal parts back.
I constantly complain that my bands volume resteicts what I can play but, the drums just don't sound good at normal level. The timbre is all wrong and this isn't just because the music is loud and aggressive but because modern production.
Drums are compressed to the hilt on these records if they are not triggered and that sound is full of attack, it got a slap to it that simpley tip-tapping away just won't do.

You have to live with the pros and cons of the style of music you play because no good music has it all. I get as much tasty licks in that I can but at the end of the day it has to sound like brutal metal assault.
Sure I can play other styles and I do so at the relevant volume. When I'm playing metal for a few hours then burst into a latin groove I have to remind myself to play quietly, it sounds awful loud, it's about hearing the voice of my snare, not the attack.

I'll never understand the snobbery towards metal when tech/prog/djent metal and new breed reverse engineered drummers are probably the ones pushng our art forward the most these days.

You have to play for your situation. Ever heard a steictly metal only drummer try and blag jazz? It's awful.
Likewise have you heard some of the fusion guys attempt double pedal? Yeah technically they are doing it but, it sounds like a bag of flumps it's embarrassing!
Even Thomas Lang who I love sound awful doing double pedal, especially double strokes, it's very nearly a completely unusable technique as I've NEVER heard anyone sound good using it.
We coule ask 'why can't you play fast AND loud where's the fff rudiments? why can't you hit the bass drum properly?
and that would be just as justified as saying metal lacks dynamics.

No-one is a worse player because of it, you're just playing the way that style needs to be played.
You make a lot of good points. Particularly that last line.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
This talk is making me think of that giant mic'd up sound. When I was young I almost lived for it.

It was such a buzz to sit behind a kit where the kick and toms went BOOOOOM

... and the snare went


I can't stand that sound now. To me it strips drummers' sound of much of their character and it seems kind of plastic / artificial.

Stadiums are the worst. About the only thing I like about stadiums is they keep other people entertained.
 

Chunky

Silver Member
I must admit Pollyanna I quite like that KAPOOW! from the kick and snare. not for volume reasons, I'd have my ear plugs in 'cos I'm a wuss, it's the feeling it in your chest and of course the sound. Only for metal and rock though.
If I went to see a jazz band and they were doing that I'd be unimpressed, jazz gets it's intensity from it's intimacy whereas djent does by the relentless fast polymeters and hard, punchy sound.
Your meant to be able to hear the smoke dance up from their cigars in jazz and that's what's great about it. You can even hear them cough! lol.

So it's very much a mood thing for me.

I have to say I'm not a fan of stadium sound, it's awful. Alot of large venue music is. The drums turn into 80's drums and the poor drummer often cuts out alot of their chops because there is no clarity.
Alot of stadium drummers don't use doubles or rudiments! That's a huge sarifice! I couldn't do it, I'd rather not play at all than have to do that!

Today I'm just in the mood for some intimate, acoutic music. I'd love to see the Dave Weckl band, not really acoustic but, his sound is soooooo natural mic'd up that it's like acoustic music just turn up a little and retaining that beautiful voice and nuance of every bit of gear on his kit. That man is something else!

Oh and thanks DrumEatDrum! :)
 
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Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Now now, you're hardly a wuss for protecting your hearing. Many ppl here either do that or play quietly. Either that or spend our old age saying "wha'?"

Sure, booms and kapows are perfect for stadium rock and metal ... but I agree, as long as it's not that generic almost-80s sound.

I saw Steely Dan at a stadium late last year ... the drums were massive and it just sounded wrong. A shame because it's not often that you get to see top notchers.

Doubles and Rudiments? What dat? A law firm? :)
 
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Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I do all of this.... Especially the last part.
I try to avoid places with lots of ambient noise. That way, I say "wha'?" less often.

I play quietly now but the damage was done a long time ago. I didn't know about musician ear plugs back then and the generic ones I used spoiled the sound for me.
 
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