The Acrolite. Is it the most versatile snare drum?

John Q. Drummer

Active Member
"Is it the most versatile snare drum?

I very much believe that versatility depends more on the drummer than on the drum. Most snares of respectable quality can adapt -- through changes to heads, tunings, and, if necessary, muffling -- to a variety of performance demands. Most important is that the snare be placed beneath the sticks of an able player.

Dude…here you go talking all levelheaded with wisdom and experience while the rest of us knuckle dragging mouth breathers are just gonna blame the drum if it doesn’t sound right. Way to go. :LOL:🤣

My general disdain for all Ludwig products will never allow me to knowledge that others consider this a “versatile” snare drum. My contempt for Ludwig goes back to the very first snare drum I ever owned 30 years ago, the humble Acrolite. That abomination and I never got along. I still don’t like them now, with decades of experience and a vastly increased ability to tune almost any drum I possess to my satisfaction. Except Acrolites. Eff those drums. (Keeping it PG rated for the kiddos.) :giggle:
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Dude…here you go talking all levelheaded with wisdom and experience while the rest of us knuckle dragging mouth breathers are just gonna blame the drum if it doesn’t sound right. Way to go. :LOL:🤣

My general disdain for all Ludwig products will never allow me to knowledge that others consider this a “versatile” snare drum. My contempt for Ludwig goes back to the very first snare drum I ever owned 30 years ago, the humble Acrolite. That abomination and I never got along. I still don’t like them now, with decades of experience and a vastly increased ability to tune almost any drum I possess to my satisfaction. Except Acrolites. Eff those drums. (Keeping it PG rated for the kiddos.) :giggle:
Good thing other people's negative opinions don't matter to me at all, because Ludwig rules.
 

SharkSandwich

Junior Member
Just going to lob this grenade thread and run.
Seriously though... I keep coming back to it as my main snare drum.

It's subjective but the Acroite is certainly very versatile in my experience.
 

ToneT

Silver Member
Dude…here you go talking all levelheaded with wisdom and experience while the rest of us knuckle dragging mouth breathers are just gonna blame the drum if it doesn’t sound right. Way to go. :LOL:🤣

My general disdain for all Ludwig products will never allow me to knowledge that others consider this a “versatile” snare drum. My contempt for Ludwig goes back to the very first snare drum I ever owned 30 years ago, the humble Acrolite. That abomination and I never got along. I still don’t like them now, with decades of experience and a vastly increased ability to tune almost any drum I possess to my satisfaction. Except Acrolites. Eff those drums. (Keeping it PG rated for the kiddos.) :giggle:
I concur with you. My Black Beauty was a flawed, over-priced piece of shite.
My Acrolite is beautifully made.
Nowadays, metal snare construction and consistency can be touch and go.
 

RVN

Member
I'll say the Acro is versatile! With the strainer engaged it sounds like a snare drum AND when it's in the off position it sounds like a tom tom.:p

Versatile depending on the genre of music? Yes, it works for the music I play.

 

harryconway

Platinum Member
It's a decent enough metal snare ..... if you like it's sound. You first have to decide if you want/like steel, aluminum, or brass. ;)
 

Jml

Senior Member
I just picked up a used, in great condition 1971 Acrolite. I’ve only played with it for a few hours…but I love it! I don’t like overtones, so I guess the Acrolite is it for me. I then sold off 3 steel snares I had, including a relatively unused Supralite. I only recently realized how HEAVY steel snares are, so the lighter weight aluminum and drier sound do it for me.
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I say just so long as what you have does what you need, then you have a versatile snare drum. I’ve owned Acros, Supras, Black Beauties, Dynas, high-end Pearls, DWs, Tamas, Yamahas, etc.,… they all did their jobs. But in a live situation I always carry two snares: one cranked high, the other medium low - because there’s not enough time to tune up between songs sometimes and it’s just smart practice to carry spares of the things you can’t live without on a gig. So if the Acro is doing it for you, then more power to you!
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry" - Administrator
Staff member
Not even on my list of favorite snares. I had a 67, and a deeper one from 2013. They both lasted maybe a month before I set them free
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I really want to like the Acro, but I just can't. I've listened to samples online and played them, and I just don't care for them. Maybe if I spent some quality time with one with good heads, tuning, etc., I'd change my opinion.
 

Jml

Senior Member
I really want to like the Acro, but I just can't. I've listened to samples online and played them, and I just don't care for them. Maybe if I spent some quality time with one with good heads, tuning, etc., I'd change my opinion.
Different strokes for different folks. No big deal if you don’t like them.
 

wraub

Gold Member
I just sold off three snare drums, and the Acro wasn't one of them. ;)
 

Lennytoons

Senior Member
It's my favorite snare. I guess that's why I have six of them. Last year I recorded all of my snares and the Acros really stood out. My old (60's) metal Pearl was a surprise. Can't go wrong with an Acro!
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
I own a 68 Supra that I never play. Down grading to an Acro isn't gonna happen. I have a N&C Alloy Classic that also gets very little use. I'm a brass and bronze guy.
 
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