The 90-degree bearing edges on Tama Granstars

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Those of us w/ Tama Granstar, Granstar Custom, and Granstar II kits are most likely aware of the big round over bearing edge. I think the Artstar II, Limited, and Custom has a slightly different back cut. I don't know about the original Artstar line.

Nonetheless, I went back through the old Tama catalogs to find out how they described the bearing edge. Here are the snips I located where they call it a 90-degree edge. to me looking at the images and my own drums, looks like a double 45 w/ a series roundover.

What do you all think?

GranstarEdge1.jpgGranstarEdge2.jpg



Full disclosure: I have a Tama Granstar II kit that is now 30 years old that I love and most likely will only part with at death. I'm aware that nostalgia is a huge part of that reason, probably about 95% of it. I also know that this kit is heavy, huge, doesn't sound as "good" as some of my other kits, and most likely never gigging out again. But I love it and if anyone has any Granstar drums in Dark Blue for sale, I'm buying.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Here are the snips I located where they call it a 90-degree edge. to me looking at the images and my own drums, looks like a double 45 w/ a series roundover.

What do you all think?
I think a 45 degree angle that dead ends into another 45 degree angle whose cut is in the opposite direction but on a plane parallel to the original 45 degree cut makes a 90 degree angle.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I think a 45 degree angle that dead ends into another 45 degree angle whose cut is in the opposite direction but on a plane parallel to the original 45 degree cut makes a 90 degree angle.
Ah, ok. I get that, that makes sense. It's still one heck of a round over though.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Probably this confusion is why the more common name now, for this edge, would be double 45 round-over.
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
If you look at the pictures the middle ply comes straight up out of shell. I think that is why they call it a 90 degree. that's the part that would create the bearing edge. Well that's my theory. LOL
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
That ad is from a time when bearing edges weren't as much of a selling point, and I don't think the terminology was as developed. I do think 90* is an odd way of describing when we see but I guess no one had thought to call it a double 45 edge yet.
 
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