The 21 Day Challenge.

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Senior Member
From another forum, might apply to drums:

The idea is that to practice anything, you should practice it perfectly for 21 days. When we apply that to learning/practicing songs, it comes down to practicing a song so slowly that you can TOTALLY accurately play it, without a single mistake. For 21 days. This way you psychologically make a habit of playing the song that way so you can easily play it faster.

Now I was wondering... would this really work?

Participate! Simply, follow these steps:

Pick a song, any song (preferably a fast one though) that you can't play real fast, but would like to be able to play (bass players, drummers, any other instruments, you can participate too!). Get your metronome (if you don't have one, go to http://www.metronomeonline.com/) and find the fastest beat at which you can play the song, PERFECTLY. Subtract 20 (or some other amount till you can easily play it) from this number, and practice at that beat every day for 21 days.
 

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Senior Member
This probably doesn't apply to rudiments or things like that, but could definitely apply to long independence sequences, longer sticking sequences or playing full songs.
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Why does it have to be fast? Why not slow? Most drummers find slow playing much more demanding than fast playing.
 

\o/

Senior Member
Well it was taken from a guitar forum so obviously other stuff could apply. But, slowing down to play something slow is hardly logical. It's for when you struggle to play fast passages. And playing things slowly and in time is hard sometimes, but this exercise is to play something where you're struggling to get the coordination tight at high speeds. Just thought it'd be useful.
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
It's just as hard to get the co-ordination right at slow speeds. I doubt many drummers have tried playing at 30BPM or less. It's actually a really great way of getting your timing and co-ordination spot on because at faster tempos these issues are more easily obscured. Accuracy starts with playing slowly.
 
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