Textured heads for brushes?

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Using heavy nylon wood-handled brushes - would textured heads be a worthwhile addition to bring out the brush sound?
I'm not using classic 'swirling' brush technique - I use the brushes like sticks basically, but I do like the sound of brushes and it might be cool if I can accentuate it.
Worth a try?
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Absolutely. Textured coatings are the only way to achieve the classic sandpaper sound associated with brushwork. Even if you use your brushes primarily as sticks, why not go with coated heads to enhance your options? You might find yourself scraping away just because you can. Give it a try.

I like coated heads for all applications. They're warmer than clear ones. They're also a bit more suited to the regulation of overtones.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Even when playing like a stick, the textured surface will bring out a little more ‘ch’ sound from each stroke. And as CMJ said above, you might find yourself doing the occasional swirl or slide.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Absolutely. Textured coatings are the only way to achieve the classic sandpaper sound associated with brushwork. Even if you use your brushes primarily as sticks, why not go with coated heads to enhance your options? You might find yourself scraping away just because you can. Give it a try.

I like coated heads for all applications. They're warmer than clear ones. They're also a bit more suited to the regulation of overtones.
I use Ambassadors already, but my snare has worn through its coating so I thought I might upgrade.
It's the specially designed 'rough textured for brushes' type that I'm thinking of, btw.
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
You need another snare drum with a coated head. That way you can use brushes without swapping heads.
My kit is just for live use with brushes at the moment - although I do have two snares now you mention it...(I can only play an e-kit at home for stick practice)
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
Even when playing like a stick, the textured surface will bring out a little more ‘ch’ sound from each stroke. And as CMJ said above, you might find yourself doing the occasional swirl or slide.
That's what I needed to hear, thanks!
Ordering one tonight :)
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I use Ambassadors already, but my snare has worn through its coating so I thought I might upgrade.
It's the specially designed 'textured for brushes' type that I'm thinking of, btw.
Remo's Coated Ambassador -- textured, not smooth white -- is the only snare batter head I use. It will give you about as classic a brush sound as you can get.
 

roncadillac

Member
I actually made a brush 'practice pad' by cutting a circle out of a cardboard box that fit the smaller diameter part of a coated drum head (the 'inner' part, before the collar) and gluing it inside the head. It took up the same space as just a drum head but the cardboard made the head rigid and feel more like a drum. It was pretty quiet but for personal practice it was great. Those Mapex steel piccolo snares are like $70 brand new and perfect for brushes. You can put a coated batter and a thin reso to make a brush specific snare for under $100.

Those UV1 heads are the best thing you could ever get for brushes. That coating just absolutely does not come off. If you are used to Remo's coating you almost may find it to be too much coating. I don't break/dent heads but I wear coating out in a couple months. I've got a UV1 on my primary gigging snare for 6+ months and it still looks just like it did when it came out of the box. I've got hours of brushes on it besides sticks as well.
 

roncadillac

Member
I'm thinking a cardboard box, put a microphone inside and connect it to the PA and it might be loud enough to play some bars. Audiences might be entertained by it.
Try a contact mic, they are really cheap and you'd be surprised at how sensitive they are.
A pizza box 'snare' and suitcase 'bass drum', both with contact mics, would be a fun shtick for quiet live gigs and really not sound bad at all.
 
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