Tell me about Paiste cymbals

rocker261

Junior Member
I bought a Tama Pancake kit just for practicing, and want to use the opportunity to try a different brand of cymbals on it. I've been Zyldjian guy forever, mostly A Custom and various Z series. I'm a hard rock drummer, and I like heavier, very bright cymbals (no dark or washy stuff for me). I understand Paiste has a different metal formula, but I've rarely heard Paiste cymbals up close, nor do I have drum shop close that stocks enough to try.

Since I like heavy, bright cymbals, I'm looking their Rude series, Signature Reflector, and also the Signature & Signature Precision lines (I don't know the difference between the two).

Can anyone enlighten me on those lines, what they sound like compared to Zyldjian? I know very little about Paiste sounds.
 

GretschedHive

Gold Member
I'm a hard rock drummer, and I like heavier, very bright cymbals
You might want to check out the Paiste 2002 series.
Users: Working musicians, enthusiasts, all players who need energy and drive and want their cymbals to cut through the music in all settings. Notable past and present 2002 players include: John Bonham, Ian Paice, Cozy Powell, Phil Rudd, Alex Van Halen, Rick Allen, Tommy Lee, Stewart Copeland, Jeff Porcaro, Chester Thompson, Terry Bozzio, Bill Bruford, Charlie Benante, Nicko McBrain...
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
What I’ve noticed having switched from Zildjian to Paiste after 50 years is the lack of the low-end “gonginess” of the Zildjians. My Paistes are very clean without this low end hum I’d get with Zildjian. But I mostly play the Traditionals, Masters, and Giant Beat models, which sound very traditional, but without that low “dirty” sound I usually got with A’s and K’s.
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
switched from Zildjian to Paiste after 50 years is the lack of the low-end “gonginess” of the Zildjians
Yes! This. I just replaced my 1977 22" Zildjian ride with Paiste Signature 33" Full Ride. Brought my Zildjian to the shop and did a side-by-side with the Paiste and lack of "gonginess" was the main difference.

Additionally, especially on the crashes, Paiste sounds a bit more "glassy".
 

I-P

Well-known Member
I was a die hard old school Zildjian guy forever. Did an audition about 5 years ago on a studio kit that had Paiste Signature Full Crashes. OH MY those sounded good! My full cymbal set up now is Paiste and has been fore several years.
I had a similar moment.
Purchased a pre-loved Signature 17" Full Crash, hit the thing and was stunned. I very quickly sold all I had and replaced with Signature's.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
One thing you should consider - with Zildjians, because they’re spin and cast, the edges are very robust and for years carrying them around in a standard thick cymbal bag was fine and they’d suffer no damage. But, I’ve seen a lot of Paistes with a small bend in the edge due to questionable transport. When I got into Paiste, especially with a 24” Masters Thin Ride, I went to an SKB 24” cymbal vault case for transport - where the cymbals aren’t resting on their edges in a bag. And so far so good.
 

I-P

Well-known Member
Damn. That's one hell of a big cymbal. :)
Alternative Music Band GIF by The Temper Trap
 

heartbeat

Active Member
I bought a Tama Pancake kit just for practicing, and want to use the opportunity to try a different brand of cymbals on it. I've been Zyldjian guy forever, mostly A Custom and various Z series. I'm a hard rock drummer, and I like heavier, very bright cymbals (no dark or washy stuff for me). I understand Paiste has a different metal formula, but I've rarely heard Paiste cymbals up close, nor do I have drum shop close that stocks enough to try.

Since I like heavy, bright cymbals, I'm looking their Rude series, Signature Reflector, and also the Signature & Signature Precision lines (I don't know the difference between the two).

Can anyone enlighten me on those lines, what they sound like compared to Zyldjian? I know very little about Paiste sounds.
The 602/602 ME and Masters series use the same alloy as Zildjian (B20). Signatures are B15, and the rest (2002, Rude, GB, 900, most PST) are B8. And Paiste's manufacturing process is completely different from Zildjian, making Paistes very consistent (you don't have to search for "the one.").

You're on the right track with your choices, but I would also throw in the 2002 and 900 series. In general, I find their B8 lines sound warmer than the Signatures, which sound more glassy, so it just depends on what you're looking for. But you really can't go wrong, IMO.

I own a ton of 2002s, Giant Beats, 602s/602 MEs, Masters, Signatures/Sig DE, and a 900. They all sound great and offer me a sound for just about anything.
 

Jeremy Bender

Platinum Member
To me the closest Paiste ever came to a Zildjian cymbal was with the original run of the Twenty series. That line was fantastic, warm bright and loud enough for a full big band and certain rock applications. They've been replaced by other lines that have their own sound and feel to them. I love the few remaining Twenty's I still have.
 
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cbphoto

Diamond Member
I think Paiste manufacturing is where the difference in sound comes from.

Every model of Paiste except Masters are made from sheets of metal (not ingots) produced at a German foundry. This, in part, gives those Paiste cymbals unparalleled consistency from cymbal to cymbal. The Masters lineup are made from ingots in Turkey. They are partially formed cymbals which are sent to Paiste/Switzerland for hammering, lathing, etc. by Paiste.

⬇️ Sheets going into the oven prior to hammering.

41ABE1A7-1DE0-4457-B283-1DD20D2AE0AB.jpeg

Good info:

 

jda

Well-known Member
making Paistes very consistent (you don't have to search for "the one.").
only possible flaw there is: You don't like any of them.
the "consistency" thing can be a two-edged sword
 
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Braincramp2

Active Member
I am a big fan of the Big beat series. They are 2002s that are heavily hammered, thin and all are crash/rides by designation though the 18&19 are too thin to ride. I use them as crashes and have the 19,20 and 21 paired up with a rude crash ride as my ride.
 

type85

Member
I think Paiste manufacturing is where the difference in sound comes from.

Every model of Paiste except Masters are made from sheets of metal (not ingots) produced at a German foundry. This, in part, gives those Paiste cymbals unparalleled consistency from cymbal to cymbal. The Masters lineup are made from ingots in Turkey. They are partially formed cymbals which are sent to Paiste/Switzerland for hammering, lathing, etc. by Paiste.

⬇️ Sheets going into the oven prior to hammering.

View attachment 126957

Good info:


All top line Paistes are also made from "cast" "ingots"!
The difference is the size!
All an ingot is (see below), is a bar, a plank or round lump that was poured molten into a mold then cooled.
The difference is Paiste's foundry makes MUCH larger ingots and then rolls them into a very long "sheet".
Zil/Sabian take much smaller ingots and roll them into a small "sheet" the size of one cymbal.

So you see, it's really semantics, created by Zildjian's marketing/advertising department in the late 70's to denigrate Paiste (Paiste was their only competition)!
This is where whole "Cast" vs. "sheet" BS comes from!
It's all detailed in the link you provided in your post......

1670649049105.png
 
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