teaching drums

I know there have been threads on this issue, and many of them, but I was wondering if you lot can help me with my particular issue.

A girl at school has asked if I could teach her the drums. She had lessons a while ago but had to stop because her parents wouldn't let her get a kit to practise on. She sings in the choir at school so is musical, and has helped in the perc section of our orchestra when we need an extra pair of hands.
I've played drums for 6 and a half years, doing grade 8 next summer, and played percussion for 9 years. I still have most of my books from when I started learning.

Do you guys think this would be a good idea? I'm a little worried about the lack of kit to practise on, but I wouldn't be teaching for grades, so would this matter? I can always teach her to play the bed :p

Does anyone know what I could teach her first? Its a long time since I started, I was thinking maybe some rhythms on snare, basic stuff, then maybe involve feet and some rudiments, then co-ordinating limbs.

Any comments would be most welcome :)
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I was going to say, if you really want to teach her percussion or just looking for an in with her it may work, but you answered my question. "I can always teach her to play the bed :p"

Why not just ask her out on a date and move on.
 
now that wasn't what I meant :). I shall change my example and say 'I could always teach her to play the chair.'

Although that may not be much better...

And besides, I'm taken.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
Why wouldn't you send her to a teacher who is experienced in guiding students? I have students who don't have a drum set, so I don't see why that should matter.

Jeff
 
Why wouldn't you send her to a teacher who is experienced in guiding students?
Partly because all the ones round here have very few gaps, partly because she asked me, and partly because I could do with a bit of money :) I did ask her that, and she said she didn't want to.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
now that wasn't what I meant :). I shall change my example and say 'I could always teach her to play the chair.'

Although that may not be much better...

And besides, I'm taken.
and you didn't say you were female...although...I see no harm in teaching what you know if indeed what you know is correct. Teach some basics and see how that goes, then go from there.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
I guess my point is I wouldn't teach someone something just because they asked me. For example, I am taking jazz piano lessons. If someone asked me for piano lessons, I would say no. I would send them to my teacher.

Does your teacher have any openings? What does your teacher say about you teaching? Does he/she think you are ready to teach?

Also, you said you needed money. That is not the reason to teach. I said in other posts that a teacher should spend a large amount of his/her earnings researching different method books, DVDs and other teaching aids. For example, I have hundreds and hundreds of books that I spent thousands of dollars on. Do I use them all - no. But I have a knowledge of the different methods and have them at my fingertips for reference.

Jeff
 
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Does your teacher have any openings? What does your teacher say about you teaching? Does he/she think you are ready to teach?
He has no gaps. I'm gonna ask him in my next lesson, see what he thinks.

Also, you said you needed money. That is not the reason to teach. I said in other posts that a teacher should spend a large amount of his/her earnings researching different method books, DVDs and other teaching aids. For example, I have hundreds and hundreds of books that I spent thousands of dollars on. Do I use them all - no. But I have a knowledge of the different methods and have them at my fingertips for reference.
I know about the teaching thing, both my parents are teachers, my mum a music teacher. I have a fair number of books, and I'm not looking into going into it properly. Just the basics, something she enjoys and can't do anywhere else.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
... I'm not looking into going into it properly. Just the basics, something she enjoys and can't do anywhere else.
I think you just answered your own question. You are not planning on being a teacher and just intend on showing her some stuff. In that case, just show her a bit of what you know. Don't charge her for it. Let her save her money for when she is interested enough to seek out a professional teacher.

Jeff
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
I think you just answered your own question. You are not planning on being a teacher and just intend on showing her some stuff. In that case, just show her a bit of what you know. Don't charge her for it. Let her save her money for when she is interested enough to seek out a professional teacher.

Jeff
Bingo!!.......do this one.
 

cnw60

Senior Member
the OP answers the question for me by saying, "it's been a long time since I started, so what should I teach first?" To me - if you're not sure what to teach, you're probably not ready to teach.

But just to be a bit of the devil's advocate here - I don't agree that formal teacher training is required for one to be an effective teacher. I think that for many people over the years, the path to teaching is started by having one person ask if they could show them how to do 'that', whatever 'that' was.

Most of my thoughts about teaching go back to my original drum teacher, who I studied with all through middle school and high school. He was a fantastic teacher, partially because he approached teaching as an art, requiring the student to understand how to break things down into their fundamental elements, look at how they relate to other things around them, and put them back together again. He also taught with the attitude that even though you might not fully comprehend everything he was giving you at the time, at some point, the tumblers would click into place and you'd get it. In many ways, he was preparing his students to become teachers.

And at the very least - he made it clear that if you lacked enthusiasm, passion and joy when you're playing (or teaching), then what's the point? My one example: I have a cousin, who is maybe eight years younger than me, who had just started playing drums in school band when he came to visit my parent's house during summer vacation. I was on break from college at the time, had my drums in basement and he was really interested in playing them. So I gave him what was probably no more than 30 minutes of explaining and showing him what to do. The only absolute thing I told him was to play without fear and to have a blast. Then I turned it over to him and he played (pretty badly at first, but he was improving...) for the entire four days he was there.

20 years later, I haven't seen him for over 15 years, and we're at his brother's wedding. Phil is now a monster drummer from playing and studying ever since that time - we're talking serious chops, living and playing in NYC, has toured Europe with different jazz bands, etc. So as I'm talking to him, I ask him if he remembers the 'lesson' I gave him back at the beginning and he looks at me and says, "you must be kidding, that's the whole reason I became a drummer!" That just blew me away - and frankly, to think that I had any influence over his path overshadows anything I have ever played on my own.

Granted - he had hundreds (or thousands) of lessons over the ensuing years that followed a more rigorous structure, so I don't mean to denigrate any of the professional teachers here, in fact, I wish I lived closer and could take some lessons from some of you guys. But - my belief is that teaching can also happen in one lesson (or two, or three...) and it can happen without books or a lesson plan - as long as the teacher knows and believes in what they're teaching.
 

dairyairman

Platinum Member
i'd say go for it. and maybe it's a good thing she doesn't have a kit. that would force her to focus on technique, which a lot of beginning drummers blow right past in favor of rocking out on the kit. you could get her started with some rudiments, proper grips, and that kind of stuff. then when she eventually does get a kit she'll have a good foundation.
 
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