tama royalstar?

805Drummer

Gold Member
bro, if you can ship to the UK, i'll buy the pedal!

However, don't get too excited about the ride... seriously i've seen B8's that have been (ab)used so much, the ink has just worn off.
Well, the hi-hats are vintage 200's, which I read were pro cymbals back then, and that Camco pedals are the same as the DW 5000s, under a different name.

But I'm confused, because I'm not too sure if I should...three other GREAT AMAZING deals:

http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931016773.html
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931013264.html
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931020579.html
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Yeah, I think I will. Is the pedal valuable? I'm probably gonna re-sell most of it, unless I really like the drums. I'm also trying to see if he'll go down to $75.
I dunno if the pedal's particularly valuable, but I love 'em. And for $75 or less? You'd be silly to not get 'em. If I was closer, I'd get 'em. Sell me the footplate pedal (or the whole business if you don't wanna separate them) so I can have a spare for parts- not that I forsee needing them anytime soon, but one rarely does, right?
 
T

trkdrmr

Guest
Whoah WAIT... The Tama Royalstar kits may be vintage. But actually in a league a bit higher than that of the whole Rockstar line. They're similar in shell construction and tone. But with Shia and Mahogany they have the vintage BOOM of the old Imperialstars.
Vaaga
I can't remember the imperialstars going "boom". They were philippine mahogany and they were more on the dead side (shell wise) like rock stars. Stewart Copelands imperialstars sounded pretty dead.
 

joshisaces

Gold Member
Well, the hi-hats are vintage 200's, which I read were pro cymbals back then, and that Camco pedals are the same as the DW 5000s, under a different name.

But I'm confused, because I'm not too sure if I should...three other GREAT AMAZING deals:

http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931016773.html
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931013264.html
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931020579.html
Those three aren't THAT great of deals...

I'd get the kit.
 

805Drummer

Gold Member
Those three aren't THAT great of deals...

I'd get the kit.
God, I hate this. I don't quite have $75 (in fact, I only have $45), and there are so many huge deals on eBay, craigslist, etc! But I don't have any money! AHHHH!!!! This is my least favorite part of drumming--having to have money. Once you have the money, buying isn't a problem.
 

metal overlord

Gold Member
Yeah, I think I will. Is the pedal valuable? I'm probably gonna re-sell most of it, unless I really like the drums. I'm also trying to see if he'll go down to $75.
Those were the Speed Kings competitors, back in the day Iron Cobras.
My dad had them for years (I believe he still does) w/ a homemade footplate.

See, my dad has a set of old Superstars (cherry red laquer) with titan series harware & those pedals. For a drum set that's 20 yrs old it sounds amazing still.

Not to sure on your Royalstars, though. But most older Tamas sound good, Supers, to Imperials, to the Royalstars they should all sound good (maybe)
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
......that Camco pedals are the same as the DW 5000s, under a different name.
Similar, yes, but not the same. The "origin" of the DW5000 can be traced to the Camco. DW was founded in 1972, and bought the Camco machinery in 1977. Tama was making the Camco pedal, "hence" the Camco by Tama name. Tama was also producing a pedal, known as the "Flexi-Flier (model 6730) strap drive pedal. Incorporating a bit of both designs, the primitive version of the Iron Cobra emerged.
 

aydee

Platinum Member
I can't remember the imperialstars going "boom". They were philippine mahogany and they were more on the dead side (shell wise) like rock stars. Stewart Copelands imperialstars sounded pretty dead.
Might have been the way he liked em, trk. My gigging kit is probably a first cousin to SC's first kit and with the right heads, it can be whatever you want it to be ( Except maybe a yammie MCAN...)
 
T

trkdrmr

Guest
Might have been the way he liked em, trk. My gigging kit is probably a first cousin to SC's first kit and with the right heads, it can be whatever you want it to be ( Except maybe a yammie MCAN...)
Original imperialstars? It's been a long time, and it probably was the tuning du jour. Even folks with double headed toms in that era liked the thud. I just don't remember them having much sustain in the early 80's. I think it was because of the era's music, and stuff like blue hydraulic drumheads on them.

The birch superstars were definately lively. I have considered restoring a set.

I'd like to hear fiberstars because they are so rare. Donn Bennetts drum studio has a snare drum, but wants about $600 for it.
 
Last edited:
B

Big_Philly

Guest
Well, the hi-hats are vintage 200's, which I read were pro cymbals back then, and that Camco pedals are the same as the DW 5000s, under a different name.

But I'm confused, because I'm not too sure if I should...three other GREAT AMAZING deals:

http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931016773.html
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931013264.html
http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/msg/931020579.html
I highly recommend that sound formula cymbal. They are great!
 
A

arlo

Guest
Look in a Guitar Center catalog or any on line shop. The cheaper side of under $1K. These Tama's are pretty rare because they were basically looked at as disposable drums. People spray painted them, thrashed them on stage, lit them on fire. If you can slip into a kit for $300 and it's in good shape, it's at least better than anything you can get new for $300. But don't pay $800 for them. You could pick up a used Pro level 3 piece for that kinda scratch.
A five piece Tama Royalstar kit cost $1,000 back in 1978. I wouldn't call that disposable.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Royalstars were only around for a few years.

They were sort of ahead of their time, good mid-line drums at a reasonable price. I don't know why they didn't sell more at the time.
 

aging_drummer

Junior Member
Royalstars were only around for a few years.

They were sort of ahead of their time, good mid-line drums at a reasonable price. I don't know why they didn't sell more at the time.
I've owned a 7pc set of royalstars since 1984 and well pleased with their performance over the years. With fresh heads and a good tuning I'd put them up against anything out there.
This set cost just under 2 grand in 1984.
 

fawfamily

Junior Member
I've owned a 7pc set of royalstars since 1984 and well pleased with their performance over the years. With fresh heads and a good tuning I'd put them up against anything out there.
This set cost just under 2 grand in 1984.
Same here, but I got it slightly used then at $850 in England. It came with no bottom heads or bottom head hardware (love it that way) and nice sounding Zanki Cymbals. What about yours?
 

Attachments

mcb003

Junior Member
I realize that this is a very old thread, but there's not too much talk about Royalstars so I thought I'd weigh in. My parents bought me a new 5 piece Royalstar in Royal Pewter in January 1981. I'd consider them middle of the road in quality, but absolutely not cheap - ask my dad! Some features where ahead of their time. In 1984 I bought a 2nd floor tom and two mounted toms (all Imperialstars). The Royalstars have a very open sound, but more vintage than do the Imperialstars from that era. Careful tuning is required, but a more modern sound can be coaxed out of them, albeit rather dull by that point. The post for the bass drum-mounted tom tom holder is of a non-standard size and difficult to find.

It's my first kit and I'll never let it go. I played all through high school and college making money in bar bands with it. I still play it occasionally in a jazz gig, believe it or not. They have held up VERY well, being played hard for nearly 29 years.
 

Attachments

therjrock

Junior Member
i actually bought a 1979 tama royalstar back awhile ago as a back up kit. it was a bit beat up and missing one rack tom. but i cleaned it up, put new heads on it and used it as a back up kit for touring. i was endorsed by another drum company. i actually ended up selling my endorsement kit due to frustration of their drums and service and used this on many arena and big club tours and our sound tech was blown away and almost upset i didn't use it more before.
mine is actually a 4 piece. sounds great with evans g2 coated heads on top and g1's for bottom heads. very full and awesome when mic'd.

i build my own kits now but will never part with this kit. if you can find one in decent shape go for it!
 

ado 85

Junior Member
hi i also own a 82 tama royal star i picked up for 150 bucks from a local paper ad about 10 years back and i still use it till this day ive had other kits but ive always ended up playing this one in the end i was using a ddrum at one point but it was not reliable as the old royal star shes a 7 piece concert tom set with a set of remo rotos all with remo heads the kit has a few marks from gigs soon i might just pull her down and try and get the shells covered in the same colour again cause i just love it
 

Attachments

ccdrums

Member
Similar, yes, but not the same. The "origin" of the DW5000 can be traced to the Camco. DW was founded in 1972, and bought the Camco machinery in 1977. Tama was making the Camco pedal, "hence" the Camco by Tama name. Tama was also producing a pedal, known as the "Flexi-Flier (model 6730) strap drive pedal. Incorporating a bit of both designs, the primitive version of the Iron Cobra emerged.
having working a few years with the tama company, there was quite a legal battle over the tama/camco pedal. dw had the molds. tama had the name. The original design of both the tama/camco and dw 5000 both based off the old camco pedal (also the gretsch pedal. camco made the gretsch pedal for them identical pedals. of course they were strap drive pedal. both tama and dw changed the cam and the new era was born.
but your right the flexi flier design was also used as part of the tama/camco pedal
 
Top