Tama Iron Cobra & Speed Cobra Bearings

cbphoto

Gold Member
Does anyone know what kind of bearings Tama uses on their Iron Cobra and Speed Cobra pedals?
Not exactly sure. Maybe this helps:

 

marratj

Well-known member
Standard Skateboard bearings (think Bones REDZ or anything from SKF that is sold in any skateboard shop). Bearing part number is 608-XXX (Z, Z2 or ZRZ, depending if fully sealed or not).

I just replaced the bearings in my 2009 Iron Cobra double pedal last weekend, that's how I know. It was a total of 6 bearings (I bought an 8-pack of SKF Reds ABEC 5 bearings for 22 EUR for this).

Smooth as butter now.
 
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Scottie15

Senior Member
Standard Skateboard bearings (think Bones REDZ or anything from SKF that is sold in any skateboard shop). Bearing part number is 608-XXX (2R or ZRZ, depending if fully sealed or not).

I just replaced the bearings in my 2009 Iron Cobra double pedal last weekend, that's how I know. It was a total of 6 bearings (I bought an 8-pack of SKF Reds ABEC 5 bearings for 22 EUR for this).

Smooth as butter now.


Excellent, thank you. Does Bones make any sealed bearings?
 

marratj

Well-known member
Good question. I simply bought my SKF bearings from an online skate shop because they had good reviews.

From my understanding unsealed ones can and should be oiled up regularly and will last a long time with proper maintenance whereas sealed ones can also last long but when they get sticky they definitely need to be replaced.

But given the price it’s not too unreasonable to replace them every 5 years or so, especially compared to what a new pedal costs.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
If you go the sealed bearing route, remove the cap from one side (a pick or small screwdriver will work) and apply some quality lithium grease to the inside as they are poorly packed from the factory and will fail sooner than you would expect.
I do this for every bearing I install in my professional capacity. The grease used is substandard and 3 little dabs do not make for "maintenance free".

For future reference: if you pull the bearing from the pedal the manufacturers part number should be stamped in the race and can then be cross referenced to another brand. If anyone can supply the OE number, I will happily provide alternatives found through my mountain of cross reference data.
 

marratj

Well-known member
I dumped the original bearings from my IC in the trash, so I cannot say anything about their part number, unfortunately.

But I can say that they were sealed with a metal plate on both sides. Assuming that the initial lubing wears out after a while that would explain why they didn’t feel fresh anymore after 12 years (didn’t clean or lube them during that time).

My new SKF bearings have the part number 608-ZRZ with a metal cap on one side and a red plastic cap on the other side. So I assume I can just pop off the plastic cap regularly and apply new lube in there, right?
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I dumped the original bearings from my IC in the trash, so I cannot say anything about their part number, unfortunately.

But I can say that they were sealed with a metal plate on both sides. Assuming that the initial lubing wears out after a while that would explain why they didn’t feel fresh anymore after 12 years (didn’t clean or lube them during that time).

My new SKF bearings have the part number 608-ZRZ with a metal cap on one side and a red plastic cap on the other side. So I assume I can just pop off the plastic cap regularly and apply new lube in there, right?
Yes you can. Use a good grease not oil as the oil will sling from the bearing and end up, well, everywhere you don't want it.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
My grease recommendation is anything with an aluminum complex base. It will withstand any pressure, heat, moisture, etc that you find in your drumming environment and it doesn't sling or thin out. A large amount of basic greases are a paraffin base which turns to soap within minutes after being exposed to any moisture.
NGLI #2 is your friend
My shop go to:
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
Ok now this is way more eye opening than I thought it would be.

I bought a pair of brand new Iron Cobra double pedals (900 series, rolling glide) nearly two years ago. I am pretty strict about checking the pedals, applying white lithium grease or silicone lubricant, and ensuring all the screws and bolts are tight. So far, I've had no issues with lag or anything.

That being said, I was reading into a number of people that replace their bearings in their pedals with skateboard bearings, and so I got intrigued.
I would assume that the stock bearings should be just fine as long as I consistently lubricate them, and it's quite a pain in the ass to take both cam assemblies apart to take the bearings out.

What are your thoughts on replacing the stock bearings @someguy01 ?
 

marratj

Well-known member
it's quite a pain in the ass to take both cam assemblies apart to take the bearings out.

It depends. I had the bearings in both pedals swapped in under 30 minutes (doing it for the first time and taking my time).

Now that I know the procedure I say it can be done within 10 minutes tops.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
What are your thoughts on replacing the stock bearings @someguy01 ?
Unless you're feeling some sort of drag in the bearing or there is noticeable binding, I wouldn't bother. Tama uses a pretty decent bearing from the factory, I would just take the time, maybe once a year, and pop the cap off the bearing and repack it with grease. Doing that should give you decades of reliability.
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
It depends. I had the bearings in both pedals swapped in under 30 minutes (doing it for the first time and taking my time).

Now that I know the procedure I say it can be done within 10 minutes tops.
For me, it's just painstaking to have to remove my adjustments and settings, and attempt to get it right the second time.
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
Unless you're feeling some sort of drag in the bearing or there is noticeable binding, I wouldn't bother. Tama uses a pretty decent bearing from the factory, I would just take the time, maybe once a year, and pop the cap off the bearing and repack it with grease. Doing that should give you decades of reliability.
Excellent. I know the Iron Cobras use 6 bearings. I'm curious how challenging it is to pop off the caps.

Also, would white lithium grease work ok?
 

someguy01

Well-known member
Excellent. I know the Iron Cobras use 6 bearings. I'm curious how challenging it is to pop off the caps.

Also, would white lithium grease work ok?
White lithium will work quite well and the caps pop off pretty easily with a pick or small flat blade screwdriver
 

Scottie15

Senior Member
Just tried popping the caps of a spare bearing I had for a spare Speed Cobra pedal. Was not easy and did not pop off..20210310_194645_copy_567x1008.jpg
 

opentune

Platinum Member
I have an older IC I'd be interested to replace bearings on but it does NOT look so easy in that last pic.
 
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