Tama Dyna Sync Pedal.

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Mustion

Senior Member
I have been playing an Iron Cobra for almost 20 years now. I've used it for a lot of things, but wouldn't mind getting a "fancier" pedal for certain situations.

Enter the new Tama Dyna Sync: I'm intrigued by the apparent benefits of direct drive, and every time I put my foot on one at the side-by-side display at the local GC or Sam Ash, it feels awesome. But, that's standing and hitting a rubber pad, not sitting behind my kit. And, being an IC user for so long, I have concerns about the alleged "loss of power" in direct drive pedals, although Tama claims that this new pedal has solved that.

So, pedal people--sell (or dissuade) me. $300+ is a lot to spend just to try it out, so I'd like to hear some first-hand experience with this guy.
 

Skilas

Member
I have concerns about the alleged "loss of power" in direct drive pedals, although Tama claims that this new pedal has solved that.
What is a "loss of power" in direct drive pedals and what has this pedal solved? I have never read such nonsense.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
What is a "loss of power" in direct drive pedals and what has this pedal solved? I have never read such nonsense.
I am looking for first-hand user experiences with this pedal, not yet another cynical education on how we're all bamboozled by the vast marketing hoopla spewed by the drum pedal industry. Thanks.
 

Skilas

Member
I am looking for first-hand user experiences with this pedal, not yet another cynical education on how we're all bamboozled by the vast marketing hoopla spewed by the drum pedal industry. Thanks.
I still want to know what is this "loss of power" in direct drive pedals. I do not want more.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I still want to know what is this "loss of power" in direct drive pedals. I do not want more.
Are you serious? It's a very common complaint about DD pedals. I've never found it to be an issue. They may not hit as hard but they hit plenty hard enough.
I've found that a slight increase in beater weight adds power to Axis pedals (obviously) without affecting speed at all. I wouldn't know about the Tama though.

I highly doubt power should be a concern with the Dyna Sync. I'd be more concerned with simply whether or not I like the feel.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
The "loss of power" with direct drive pedals is related to how the beater travels once you remove any force from the pedal itself.
In a chain or strap drive the beater can move faster than the pedal board and the chain or strap is free to become slack. With a direct drive the pedal and the beater are always moving in relation to each other. Essentially you get a little bonus energy from the chain/strap system because the beater decelerates more slowly than on a direct drive when force is removed from the pedal.
 

Skilas

Member
Are you serious? It's a very common complaint about DD pedals.
I'm serious. What happens with some DD pedals is not a "loss of power" but rather a relatively increased spring resistance towards the end of the movement. There are DD pedals that don't have it at all and pedals with a chain or strap and strong eccentricity that have it.

In a chain or strap drive the beater can move faster than the pedal board and the chain or strap is free to become slack.
The beater is driven either by the foot or by the spring. How can the chain or strap become slack while playing?
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
How can the chain or strap become slack while playing?
Because there is less inherent stiffness in the system with a flexible linkage like a strap or chain. It’s the same reason you can crack a whip, but you can’t do the same with a stiff piece of wood the same length and weight as the whip. Looseness gives you the extra speed.
 

Skilas

Member
Because there is less inherent stiffness in the system with a flexible linkage like a strap or chain. It’s the same reason you can crack a whip, but you can’t do the same with a stiff piece of wood the same length and weight as the whip. Looseness gives you the extra speed.
We have a pure tensile load here and a chain or strap is in this case absolutely stiff. Zero flexibility. Even though many believe it, no chain and no strap can become slack while playing.
 
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Mongrel

Silver Member
Does anybody else want to take this? I am st a loss with this guy.
Not me...

I had a bicycle once that had a non-flexible chain. But I had left it out in the rain for a week so I am not sure that counts.

This time of year...Flexible Flyers come to mind, but I don't know the tensile load on a Flexible Flyer runner with 200lb. adult onboard.

Yea....I think you're on your own man...no tapping out!
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I am looking for first-hand user experiences with this pedal . . .
Likewise. I tried one out at Dale's Drum Shop and really liked how it felt on a drum (they've got a nice pedal demo-room) but the price of $350 cooled me down pretty quick.

One option is to listen to the Modern Drummer podcast in which they review the pedal. Their bottom line: It'll be the last pedal you'll ever buy.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
The "loss of power" with direct drive pedals is related to how the beater travels once you remove any force from the pedal itself.
In a chain or strap drive the beater can move faster than the pedal board and the chain or strap is free to become slack. With a direct drive the pedal and the beater are always moving in relation to each other. Essentially you get a little bonus energy from the chain/strap system because the beater decelerates more slowly than on a direct drive when force is removed from the pedal.
Conceptually, this makes sense. I do wonder how considerable of a difference that really makes, though; does the beater really carry enough momentum on its own to overcome the downward force exerted by one's foot to create any slackness at all much less that which is perceptible? And if real, I wonder if the loss of that little boost wouldn't then be compensated for by the greater efficiency of a direct drive linkage.

By the way, I'm not trying to argue here, just trying to pick apart myth from science! Seems there must be enough user experience to make this a legitimate complaint, but I wonder how much of that is prejudice and how much is real.
 

Mustion

Senior Member
Likewise. I tried one out at Dale's Drum Shop and really liked how it felt on a drum (they've got a nice pedal demo-room) but the price of $350 cooled me down pretty quick.

One option is to listen to the Modern Drummer podcast in which they review the pedal. Their bottom line: It'll be the last pedal you'll ever buy.
I doubt I'll get around to listening to that, but that seems to echo the general sentiment I've seen in user reviews, which amounts to "I though my pedal was the best... and then I got the Dyna Sync". I'm really tempted, now to wait out for a good deal to come along. Why didn't I think of this before Black Friday...
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
The "loss of power" with direct drive pedals is related to how the beater travels once you remove any force from the pedal itself.
It's actually due to the rate that the beater moves in relation to the pedal being pressed. With a round cam, both move at exactly the same rate. With an offset cam, they move at different rates. How different, and where the difference is accentuated, is dependant on how the cam is shaped.
 

Treverer

Junior Member
I'd already own a Dyna-Sync if Tama would bother to make a lefty version. Even asking them is useless, German distributor, Japanese distributor, Tama on social media, nobody knows or cares... Now Yamaha will get my money.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'd already own a Dyna-Sync if Tama would bother to make a lefty version. Even asking them is useless, German distributor, Japanese distributor, Tama on social media, nobody knows or cares... Now Yamaha will get my money.
You can make the righty a lefty. You have to remove the mainshaft and flip everything around on both the master and slave pedals. You now have a lefty version.
 
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