Tama Dyna- Sync Observation

Chunkaway

Silver Member
I recently picked up a new Tama Dyna-Sync bass drum pedal. I had been using my trusty DW 5000 for the past couple of years, but I read several reviews about how smooth and quick the Dyna-Sync is.

After playing with this pedal for a few weeks, I noticed that it definitely is smooth and quick, but I can’t seem to get the same power from it the way that I did from the DW. My DW pedal definitely provides more volume out of the drum.

I have spent a lot of time adjusting the pedal but to no avail. I’m not sure if inherent in the design is a cause for the lack of volume or if I am doing something wrong. Just something I noticed.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
That appears to be a longboard? If so, it’s tff get e nature of the beast. I had an axis short I loved, then decided the long would be even better. Hated it. The Mapex falcon was a decent compromise, but at the moment I find the stupid cheap Yamaha 7210 or it’s 8000 series cousin to be king. Simple, light and effective with zero tech. Before that I was trying everything I could get my hands on and nine measured up. The 7210 is real close to the old single chain 5000 with none of the wobble or cost.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
I recently picked up a new Tama Dyna-Sync bass drum pedal. I had been using my trusty DW 5000 for the past couple of years, but I read several reviews about how smooth and quick the Dyna-Sync is.

After playing with this pedal for a few weeks, I noticed that it definitely is smooth and quick, but I can’t seem to get the same power from it the way that I did from the DW. My DW pedal definitely provides more volume out of the drum.

I have spent a lot of time adjusting the pedal but to no avail. I’m not sure if inherent in the design is a cause for the lack of volume or if I am doing something wrong. Just something I noticed.
Possibly the beater itself, I have an HP900RG myself and I find it quieter than the DW9000 that I use at my practice space. Try a DW101 beater or a heavy beater of your choice and see if it makes a difference. It probably will..

Also never rely on gadgets to overcome technique, it's a bad habit.
 

michaelg

Member
I find the dyna easier to get more power out of then my strap 5000. Go with a heavy beater and a good throw.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
Thanks guys. The beater is exactly the same one I was using with my DW pedal. I can try some other ones, but the DW one has a weight on it so it’s pretty heavy already.

And just to be clear, I wasn’t trying to compensate for poor technique when I bought the Dyna-sync. Rather, I had read that is was smooth, fast, and gave a great connection to the player. That seemed really ideal to me. Of course, with a pandemic I couldn’t try it out beforehand.
 

Jml

Senior Member
I’ve read from others over the years on this forum that a direct drive pedal is not as strong or powerful as a chain drive. I haven’t tested that theory but perhaps that is what you’re experiencing.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
I’ve read from others over the years on this forum that a direct drive pedal is not as strong or powerful as a chain drive. I haven’t tested that theory but perhaps that is what you’re experiencing.
I think the difference is in the cam. There are 4 factors involved in how hard the beater hits with a chain (cam) pedal:
1. your foot pressing down (obviously)
2. the pendulum motion of the beater (beater weight and height)
3. the cam (propels the beater forward toward the end of the stroke)
4. spring tension (only has an affect on fast strokes)

Direct drive pedals are missing the advantage (in power) from not having a cam. It's the compromise for gaining the ultra quick response from a DD pedal.
I have, however, found that adding a little weight to the beater doesn't slow down a DD pedal, but adds a bit of power (and control, because you can feel the pendulum motion better.)

Also cam drive pedal beater angles tend to be larger (further back) than DD drive beaters, making the travel longer which of course hits harder.
 

Chunkaway

Silver Member
I think the difference is in the cam. There are 4 factors involved in how hard the beater hits with a chain (cam) pedal:
1. your foot pressing down (obviously)
2. the pendulum motion of the beater (beater weight and height)
3. the cam (propels the beater forward toward the end of the stroke)
4. spring tension (only has an affect on fast strokes)

Direct drive pedals are missing the advantage (in power) from not having a cam. It's the compromise for gaining the ultra quick response from a DD pedal.
I have, however, found that adding a little weight to the beater doesn't slow down a DD pedal, but adds a bit of power (and control, because you can feel the pendulum motion better.)

Also cam drive pedal beater angles tend to be larger (further back) than DD drive beaters, making the travel longer which of course hits harder.
Hmm...that’s interesting. I wonder what I can do to try to compensate for the lack of a cam. I mean, I have a pretty heavy beater/weight on there now.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
I noticed that the DD pdp I recently got is more responsive, but I didn't notice any drop in volume from the Mapex it replaced.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
My thoughts on the DD power loss. A chain pulls straight down. No real change in that throughout its operation. It moves ever so slightly forward as the footboard goes down, but its negligible.

The DD linkage moves at both attachment points, top and bottom. As you push the pedal down, the top attachment point moves towards the drummer. The bottom attachment point moves towards the head, but very little like the chain. So in essence when you step down, the linkage at some point is working against itself by moving in 2 opposite directions.

Look at this and imagine how the two points travel together:

20210104_181931.jpg
 

Quai34

Junior Member
I’ve read from others over the years on this forum that a direct drive pedal is not as strong or powerful as a chain drive. I haven’t tested that theory but perhaps that is what you’re experiencing.
I read that too but I was not looking for power with my disability, more the easiest way to compensate for my poor ability to NOT be able to keep my ankle stiff as I cannot be on my toes...And the dyna sync was the only one that allow me to simply play, fast, easy, light etc...
But I didn't change any setting, just the angle of the board but I like the fact that my heel could rest on the board, so, I didn't know it was a long board "in fine" but I like it...
Also, I watched a lot of videos online to see how they were figuring out how to get speed and power at the same time and understood that in moving the attachement back and forth you are between more power or more speed...their videos make sense and this, I kept the middle.
As for the beatter, I have kept the stock one, there is so much different beater in the market that I cannot feel myself confident to try any other...
 
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bud7h4

Silver Member
I noticed that the DD pdp I recently got is more responsive, but I didn't notice any drop in volume from the Mapex it replaced.
My Axis longboards don't hit as hard as my Speed Cobras but with minor adjustments and simply by getting accustomed to them they hit plenty hard.

George Kollias with his Axis A21 . . . . BLAM BLAM BLAM BLAM
 
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