Switching Gear DURING a set.

drummer-russ

Gold Member
switching gear during set = dead time. Something we try to avoid as much as possible. Set up another stand. simple and considerate.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I'm another person in the "set it up ahead of time" camp.

I also remember what a music teacher once told me: "About 99% of the people in your audience are musically illiterate. Unless it's a signature sound/fill to the song, they don't know if you're playing the exact fill or if you are hitting a 16 inch crash when the record sounds like an 18 inch or bigger one. If you nail the essence of the song, the singer delivers the lyrics in an entertaining way, you've done your job."

Also, consider an electronic kit where a simple tap can change your entire kit and cymbals.

Lastly: The stage is not the studio.
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
It can be done, but I would keep it to a minimum and only if the music really demands it and you can make the change really quickly, avoiding dead time.

For example I do sometimes use a highly tuned metal snare for the first three numbers and then switch to a deeper low/med tuned wood snare for the rest of the gig. I tell the sound person that I am doing this in advance.

As for cymbals no, I myself wouldn't bother as this really can't be done without drawing attention and or slowing down the set.
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
I think it only works when very polished bands do this, it doesn't feel like a delay, it feels like a change of pace in the show.

I play with a band that likes to do the Chinese fire drill thing on the instruments. On a good night it's a minor inconvenience and a very unprofessional delay to the gig on a bad night.
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
I think it only works when very polished bands do this, it doesn't feel like a delay, it feels like a change of pace in the show.

I play with a band that likes to do the Chinese fire drill thing on the instruments. On a good night it's a minor inconvenience and a very unprofessional delay to the gig on a bad night.
Yeah, I've seen a decent number of local bands do the whole switching instruments thing. My band (except me) does it on a few songs too. I find it rather annoying. When I see bands do this, I either think A) someone doesn't know how to play the part on their instrument, or B) they're trying to show the crowd (who couldn't give half a crap about that stuff) that they're super awesome, and can play guitar, as well as bass (soooo impressive). Just a bumbling, pointless waste of time if you ask me.
 

boltzmann's brain

Senior Member
it just doesn't seem necessary to me... one can coax a near infinite variety of sounds and emulations from each drum, cymbal, stand, stick, brush. that's a lot of sounds. my calculator says e. i guess it can't count to infinity...
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
One thing I like to do is flip my tom over and play reso head. I find I can get either a sharp sound that works with multi hit and rim techniques or a nice warm round accent. I keep it on a snare stand just for this purpose. Though, I was inspired by Chinese Paigu drums, that are tuned melodically in a pentatonic set and change keys by flipping the sides, which are tuned to a suitable interval to do so. I was unable to get my tom heads to be independent enough to get two different tones though, mostly just a sharp side and a warm side.
 
G

Ghostnote

Guest
I have a 5×15 Legacy snare drum that I usually keep at a med high tension and a 5×15 Supralite tuned med low. I dont tighten the basket on my snare stand, and both drums are the same size, so I can change the snare in 5 seconds if I want a different sound for a song. Sometime down the road I'll add a 5×15 Black Magic to the mix and then I can have one drum tuned high, one meduim, and one low. I have a 5×15 Vaughncraft walnut shell that I forgot all about that I should get around to building and then I would have four 5×15's to switch between...

As far as switching rides goes, I dont need to because I always have both a heavier ride and a light ride in my set up.
 
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