Swinging straight rolls

johanisu

Member
The rolls are meant to be buzzed. Don't play double strokes. Second line has a loose feel. Playing double strokes turns it into a military cadence. Play the phrase first without the buzzes, hand to hand (R L R L etc) then add the buzzes in once you've got the swung feel.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Huh, I guess that's some kind of hipped-up second line- never heard that groove before. Those are 5-stroke rolls, but he's really crushing them. The swing should be relaxed, like this- Zigaboo is a little more legato about it.

He's also not playing the written roll on the & of 4; he's actually playing beat 4 rRrl most of the time.
 

samthebeat

Silver Member
tommys groove is not eactly the most generic of grooves, wonder why he chose that one? strange. This meters track so fat, love the meters, Second line playing is a real fun way apply rudiments. Some of the older march stuff is great, i got a real good book on it, forget whats its called, Jazz and Second Line drumming, ace fun.
 

Duracell

Senior Member
Great answers guys! I have two more questions though:

1. What does it mean to " crush a roll "?
2. What are good sources for this kind of drumming? Is there anything online, books, DVD's?
 

Duracell

Senior Member
New Orleans and Second Line Drumming, its great fun.
Oh I was familiar with those terms but I find it hard to find any information sources on it online or otherwise. I do realize this really one of those music styles that's hard to put into notes however a good primer of some sort would be nice.
 

bigbang

Pioneer Member
Little Feat - another band that does stuff similar including rock sensibilites into their second line feel. Richie Hayward is very under-rated.
I'm guessing when he says "crush" it's the same as a "buzz" ?
 

samthebeat

Silver Member

jasonrhcp

Senior Member
Well...with all due respect...thats not really a Second Line beat....Listen to herlin riley play this more roots second line feel..its really more of a "2 Beat" not a "clave"...thats more mardi gras indian..

http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/herlinrileyramble.html

Also..one of my teachers turned me onto this track by Dr. John, which has a great second line groove...The great thing on this record is drummer Freddie Staehle's laidback second-line drumming. Amazing feel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBuT0Zmnkfw

Now THATS a second line beat!!!

Take it to the streets is more contemporary, not really second line per se...but cool..!
 

Busy b

Member
Well...with all due respect...thats not really a Second Line beat....Listen to herlin riley play this more roots second line feel..its really more of a "2 Beat" not a "clave"...thats more mardi gras indian..

http://www.drummerworld.com/Videos/herlinrileyramble.html

Also..one of my teachers turned me onto this track by Dr. John, which has a great second line groove...The great thing on this record is drummer Freddie Staehle's laidback second-line drumming. Amazing feel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBuT0Zmnkfw

Now THATS a second line beat!!!

Take it to the streets is more contemporary, not really second line per se...but cool..!
I've actually been spending some time focusing on second-line drumming/street beats and have been checking these two tunes recently.

I'd recommend Take it to the Street. It does dive into the modern stuff quickly, but what's in the first two chapters is enough to bite your teeth into. You could spend a lot of time on the first two pages of chapter 1 - trying to develop the 'feel' and creating your own variations. Also, the audio cd that goes with the book is pretty good. I don't listen to Galactic or anything, but Stanton Moore is a great drummer. He's got an amazing groove.

'New Orleans Jazz and Second Line Drumming' by Herlin Riley and Johnny Vidacovich is a great book. There's also 'A Modern Approach to Second Line Drumming' by Chris Lacinak, which I've never checked out.

It's great music from a very interesting tradition. Playing this stuff really helps with your groove playing.
 

Busy b

Member
One thing about the "New Orleans Feel" is that the notes are "in between the cracks" or between a straight feel and a swung feel. A good exercise from 'Take it to the Street' is to set your metronome (80bpm +) and start with straight 16ths (RLRL) and then slowly move into swung 16ths. Go back and forth between straight and swung and try to hover in between these two feels. Eventually you'll be able to do this with buzz rolls.
 

eddypierce

Senior Member
I'd recommend Take it to the Street. It does dive into the modern stuff quickly, but what's in the first two chapters is enough to bite your teeth into. You could spend a lot of time on the first two pages of chapter 1
Exactly. I've actually only worked out of the stuff in the traditional chapter of the book (thus far), but have found it very helpful, and worth the price of the book by itself.

Ed
 
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