Supraphonic hardware question

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I made a recording and I'm trying to upload it and it's not working. I have an mp3 and a wav and it rejects them both. I haven't uploaded since the new look. Any uploading audio help appreciated. I can't even get YT to take it.

I just tapped my snare reso with the wires off so you could hear the note to compare it to the note yours makes. But I'm failing.
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
Th
This is from a vintage Supra. The lug fits perfectly over the bead with no play. As for the reso a perfect fourth higher is a common interval.
they DEFINITELY changed up the construction then. I have around a millimeter of space between the lug “bridge” and the bead itself. I finally know why Ludwig put the rubber gaskets on them. Christ.
It can’t be a manufacturing error when every single lug has the same issue. I’m putting the rubber gaskets on immediately. This was a revelation, I hope you all read this comment.
I can’t upload an image because it’s too large apparently, can someone help? This is some useful information for everyone. They are clearly different drums. I’m very certain they changed the size of the bead for some reason. I’m taking this apart immediately, putting the rubber back on.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
If the lug is literally sliding up/down the shell, then not only would there have to be space between the lug's "bridge" and the shell's bead, but the lug posts would have to be a good bit smaller than the holes for them in the shell, i.e. not a snug fit. Is that normal? (I've never owned any Ludwig drum.)
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
If the lug is literally sliding up/down the shell, then not only would there have to be space between the lug's "bridge" and the shell's bead, but the lug posts would have to be a good bit smaller than the holes for them in the shell, i.e. not a snug fit. Is that normal? (I've never owned any Ludwig drum.)
It’s apparently normal for newer Ludwig drums that come with rubber gaskets between the shell and the lugs.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Th

they DEFINITELY changed up the construction then. I have around a millimeter of space between the lug “bridge” and the bead itself. I finally know why Ludwig put the rubber gaskets on them. Christ.
It can’t be a manufacturing error when every single lug has the same issue. I’m putting the rubber gaskets on immediately. This was a revelation, I hope you all read this comment.
I can’t upload an image because it’s too large apparently, can someone help? This is some useful information for everyone. They are clearly different drums. I’m very certain they changed the size of the bead for some reason. I’m taking this apart immediately, putting the rubber back on.
Fritz, you can probably throw my advice right out the window because it is not in agreement with current fashion. But this has worked for me for the last thirty years of snare drum tuning. It was shown to me by a respected fellow drummer at the music store where I worked.

First, the lug gasket. You can go either way you want, but I've played Supras with and without them, and I can hear zero difference. But Ludwig installed them on their best-selling, most-revered snare drum, and I can't believe that they did so on a whim. Personally, I'd put them back.

(And, yes, I know that, just as in the audio hobby (where people insist they can hear the sonic difference between cables!), there are "golden ears" in every crowd. They seem to hear things that 90% of the rest of us do not hear. That's fine. I'm an average guy, an average drummer, and an average "hearer" who knows only what sounds good to the "rest of us.")

The snare head. I used to tighten that sucker down so tight that I would run out of threads on the t-rods. And, I constantly had all kinds of weird rings and buzzes that I just could not fix. My friend admonished me for this and showed me how to tune the reso head to or just below a low/medium tension. He demonstrated how a reso head looses resonance as it is tightened. With the loss of resonance there came a loss of flexibility that actually functioned to control snare buzz. When I learned to keep the snare head and snares relatively loose, snare buzz and strange whines disappeared. This happy medium requires a lot of experimentation with reso tuning and snare wire tension, but both tend to work best on the loose side of the equation. (If your snare side head and your snares have already been overtightened/stretched, you will never be able to achieve this balance. Both need to be in like-new condition. Stretched out reso heads and snares will never become unstretched and will not seat properly.)

The batter head. Tune it loose. Tune it tight. It doesn't matter. But use the batter to determine pitch - not the reso! Correcting the interplay between the resonant head and the snare wires will determine the quality of the drum's sound (and are the source and cure for buzzes, rattles, and whines) - but the batter head controls the pitch.

OK. As noted, you are quite free (and maybe justified) to completely ignore this advice. It's exactly the opposite of current "wisdom." But I simply had to offer my observation on the issue.

GeeDeeEmm
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
My 2 cents, for what it's worth.......
- As far as the batter head is concerned, I have never liked a coated CS reverse dot head on any snare drum. I know lots of people do, but I find they have a weird mid-rangey overtone that I don't like. I have had great success on my supras, both old and new, with a coated emperor or ambassador...especially if you like an open sound.
- Gaskets. I am sure you are aware of the amount of rubber on the shell when you total up all of the gaskets. It's a lot and DOES make a difference in the sound. I have A-B'd supras with and without gaskets and there is a difference, and not that subtle of one either. I much preferred the gasket-less version. More robust sound.
- I have heard that Ludwig had changed the supraphonic shell slightly, both in alloy percentages and overall size. No one can seem to confirm this as fact, but many have stated that they are different from the early (pre-blue olive round sticker inside, says "Anti-galvanic" instead) supraphonics we know and love.
- Bottom head tension. Purely personal preference, but it's fairly common knowledge that to get the snare to "pop" and sizzle, the bottom head should be very tight. I tune my hazy ambassador almost as tight at it will go, which ends up around a "G" note, about 390 HZ. This, coupled with a medium tight coated emperor (about a "D" note 295 - 305 HZ) will get you a great snare sound.
So all in all, the shell may be a touch smaller, which would lead to the lug casings having a gap between them and the bead. You can put the gaskets back on to make up for that, but in my opinion, you will lose a touch of presence in the drum. You may be OK with that, just have to see. Ludwig has done some "scratch your head" type of things with the newer lines of metal snare drums (gaskets, etc.) but you should still be able to make it sound great. It shouldn't be that difficult unless there is something inherently wrong with the shell, heads, hoops. Those things are unlikely, so if you are still having issues after addressing the above mentioned factors, it may not be the drum you are hearing in your head. Good luck brother, I know it is frustrating :(
 
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