Super Sensitive snares...worth it?

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Does anybody see the Super Sensitive snare drum as a major improvement or unnecessary? I'm going w/ unnecessary/not worth it.

I have a 1979 Ludwig Supra SS 6.5 x 14. I paid $100.00 USD for it used at Sam Ash like 6 years ago. Turning the snares off is problematic, as the strainer handle doesn't stay put so I can't play it snareless unless I secure the position of the strainer handle with something. I'm not sure that the sound difference is worth the extra hassle of the SS strainer. Was looking for others experiences/opinions.
 

jodgey4

Silver Member
I have the LM411, and IMO....... as much as it pains me to say it, no it's not worth it. For the price I could have gotten tube lugs on a gorgeous Black Beauty! It's nice, and has a few cool features, but nobody's gonna hear any difference I don't think. Plus, you are really kinda stuck with 3 choices of wires to use, all 20-strand and probably the same construction and materials. If there was some kind of clip to use normal wires, it might be worth it, but you'd still have to buy a square case to fit it.
 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
I had a BB SS about 10 years ago and after a couple months sold it. The snare tension knobs would loosen up and the wires would fall off. I adjusted it over and over trying different settings but to no avail. For orchestra work it may be OK. That is what it was designed for. A rock drum it isn't.

Truth be told I find most Ludwig snares kinda lacking, Some BBs and Supras sound great but it's kinda hit or miss. Yeah I know, The most recorded drum in history. LOL Maybe in the 60s and 70s but not now, It was the most recorded snare because everyone and their brother owned one. You bought a Ludwig kit and in most cases got one.

I played a Supra for a long time, small stages, big stages. inside outside. all over the freakin place, Recorded an album on Columbia records with one, I still have a 60s era Supra that I keep for nostalgia but I rarely play it.

There are so many better choices these days. YMMV
 
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IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I had a BB SS about 10 years ago and after a couple months sold it. The snare tension knobs would loosen up and the wires would fall off. I adjusted it over and over trying different settings but to no avail. For orchestra work it may be OK. That is what it was designed for. A rock drum it isn't.

Truth be told I find most Ludwig snares kinda lacking, Some BBs and Supras sound great but it's kinda hit or miss. Yeah I know, The most recorded drum in history. LOL Maybe in the 60s and 70s but not now, It was the most recorded snare because everyone and their brother owned one. You bought a Ludwig kit and in most cases got one.

I played a Supra for a long time, small stages, big stages. inside outside. all over the freakin place, Recorded an album on Columbia records with one, I still have a 60s era Supra that I keep for nostalgia but I rarely play it.

There are so many better choices these days. YMMV
:p

 

Steady Freddy

Pioneer Member
Hmmmm, let me check..... Both Bill Bruford and Phil Collins played and recorded with the Ludwig Super-Sensitive throughout the 70s. Sounded pretty great to me. Also, I used one for a few years with ZERO issues/problems. Best snare I've ever owned, bar none.
[/QUOTE

Wow there's two. Can we get a third? hahahaha Just messing around,
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Hmmmm, let me check..... Both Bill Bruford and Phil Collins played and recorded with the Ludwig Super-Sensitive throughout the 70s. Sounded pretty great to me. Also, I used one for a few years with ZERO issues/problems. Best snare I've ever owned, bar none.
That short "snap" was such a distinct part of Phil's sound. It's hard to get a snare to respond so quickly but not sound choked but that's the appeal of the Super Sensitive.

If the strainer sucks, why own it?
Well, I'd argue the problem isn't really the strainer, but the typical operator. They're more complicated than a normal throw off, and (much like the similarly maligned P-85) they do not handle abuse well at all. But they provide a particular sound you can't really get from other mechanisms. But just like everything else, you have to decide for yourself if the trouble is worth it.
 

TJK

Well-known member
Hmmmm, let me check..... Both Bill Bruford and Phil Collins played and recorded with the Ludwig Super-Sensitive throughout the 70s. Sounded pretty great to me. Also, I used one for a few years with ZERO issues/problems. Best snare I've ever owned, bar none.
Alex Van Halen used one as well as Charlie watts. Pretty sure AVH was a fairly robust player 🙄
 
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TJK

Well-known member
I had a 67 6.5 I restored and sold for a small profit. I personally loved the sound and how you can adjust the tension of wires as well as the tension of them on the head. The drum never had a choked snare sound like the supra can have with the plastic straps. They can disengage if you smack it hard, I wedged mine shut and never had a problem.
 
Joe Morello at different stages of his career. Good for jazz, and orchestral type applications. Typical rock, or pop band? I see/hear no real advantage.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Well, I'd argue the problem isn't really the strainer, but the typical operator. They're more complicated than a normal throw off, and (much like the similarly maligned P-85) they do not handle abuse well at all. But they provide a particular sound you can't really get from other mechanisms. But just like everything else, you have to decide for yourself if the trouble is worth it.
Still sounds a bit on the wimpy side. I mean, this isn't fine china. It needs to be tough(er). For musicians who don't just sit their snare on a stand and leave it. JMO I'm sure these snares sound great. But, there needs to be a throw off that can handle some level of abuse.
 

notvinnie

Senior Member
Still sounds a bit on the wimpy side. I mean, this isn't fine china. It needs to be tough(er).
It's plenty robust. P L E N T Y. Due to the way the strainer extends from the shell, it requires a proper case for transport. That is the usual culprit for damage. Aside from that, it's a great, durable, solid instrument. If you've never tried one, let alone owned one, you really shouldn't be throwing stones.
 
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