Struggles of Short Drummer and 5-Piece with Offset Toms

timmdrum

Silver Member
Had planned to use a hack saw, since that is what we have on hand.
Oh, good lord, no! The pizza-cutter-like tube cutter is so easy and quick, you'll thank the tool gods that it exists. Trust me. Just cut small sections off at a time until you get the desired results.

Was it noted that this only works if the straight tube extending down from the basket section is bottoming out in the bottom of the tripod part? Be weary of that. If the underside of the basket is hitting the wingnut... thing, at the top of the tripod's center tube, then there's nothing that cutting will fix.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Dragonfly 66, you're making things too complicated, I think. I don't see the use of a specific pedal (the vector). When you play concert, backline kit you don't have the time to adjust everything, you need to adapt quickly. Your kit is bloody nice, with a 20" bass and shallow toms, a good start.
I second this. Don't get into stuff that's too specialized; you may become kinda dependent on it, then if it gets discontinued and your piece breaks or is lost/stolen, you're back to square one.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Oh, good lord, no! The pizza-cutter-like tube cutter is so easy and quick, you'll thank the tool gods that it exists. Trust me. Just cut small sections off at a time until you get the desired results.

Was it noted that this only works if the straight tube extending down from the basket section is bottoming out in the bottom of the tripod part? Be weary of that. If the underside of the basket is hitting the wingnut... thing, at the top of the tripod's center tube, then there's nothing that cutting will fix.
That's why you cut both tubes. Making the inner one shorter only doesn't shorten the height of the main tube. You have to shorten that as well. Otherwise you are at the mercy of the height of the main tube also.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
That's why you cut both tubes. Making the inner one shorter only doesn't shorten the height of the main tube. You have to shorten that as well. Otherwise you are at the mercy of the height of the main tube also.
As I stated, if the upper half's tube is bottoming out in the *bottom* of the tripod section, then cutting only the upper tube is needed. If the two sections meet at the wingnut part of the tripod sections's tube, then yes, cutting the upper one is useless. If that's the case, how would one shorten the tube of the bottom tripod section? Is the wingnut... dang, I don't know what that's called, the thicker part that actually grips the upper tube, able to be removed from the straight tube, tube cut, and then wingnut thing re-attached?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
As I stated, if the upper half's tube is bottoming out in the *bottom* of the tripod section, then cutting only the upper tube is needed. If the two sections meet at the wingnut part of the tripod sections's tube, then yes, cutting the upper one is useless. If that's the case, how would one shorten the tube of the bottom tripod section? Is the wingnut... dang, I don't know what that's called, the thicker part that actually grips the upper tube, able to be removed from the straight tube, tube cut, and then wingnut thing re-attached?
Yes it can be removed. It will either just be pressed on, or be pressed and have a pin. Remove the pin if it has one, then using a block of wood so you don't damage anything, place the block of wood at the base of the collar and gently hammer around the circumference. It will pop the top so to speak, then you can cut the tube. Press the top back on and you are done.

You can also remove the tripod in pretty much the same fashion. It will have a pin, screw, or Allen bolt. The downside to removing the tripod is you must replace the pin/screw/bolt, and that requires taping a new hole. If you don't the tripod base will fall off and your stand will collapse.

In my experiences the inner tube is usually the same length or shorter than the outer tube. This is why you cut both.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I'm late to the game but I'll give a quick rundown on what I do.

I often set up the kick, snare, hats, and throne first. That is where you spend most of your time. Sitting too high or low will effect my playing. same with sitting on the edge or leaning back. It makes a HUGE difference. Make sure your posture is good too as slouching will take a way reach and comfort.

Next I'll set up my 2 offset toms and my floor tom. I am never reaching. I like them as low as I can go and flat as I can go. I have found a bit of an angle on them means I don't have to reach as far forward and hit straight down all the time. I may even angle them a bit more next time I change my set up and I am 6'0.

I keep my snare and floor tom roughly the same height. After I'll add my ride and make sure it is in good relation with the rest of the kit. When I don't offest the toms the positioning changes and sometimes I need to adjust the floor tom also.

finally the crash cymbals. I used to like them really low. This is bad for mic's and bleed from the toms. Studio guys don't love that. Neither do sound guys. I found raising them up a bit helps with the bleed, and allows me to put them wherever without being in the way of my toms. Not a ton, but a few inches makes a big difference.

My issue is the double pedal. THAT really forces me to have to move my hats out further left. I have gotten used to it, but either my left foot feels good on the hats, or the second pedal which I use way more. The issue is my right hand has to reach a bit more now. I am pretty used to it however.

Having shorter legs doesn't allow you to hang the toms over the front of the kick drum i realized as moving the kick further away will be an issue. That is one way to get more room for the toms.

One thing to try would be to turn the toms so that the small one is closer and the second rack is a bit further. It will buy you an inch or 2 for your hat placement. This is what I do to get my small rack tom from being in a tough spot. Aesthetically it doesn't look as nice but I don't play for looks. I end up moving my snare a bit right and forward when I do this as well giving me more hats room. The snare stand is close enough to my bass pedal that turning the stand the right way is critical.

I think you are close and moving that kick drum even an inch to the right will bring the toms over an inch and the hats in an inch and make a large difference. Turning the toms slightly might get you a second one.

I feel the same way and I'm average height. I can never get it set up JUST how I want it.
 

Rochelle Rochelle

Senior Member
I'm late to this thread but your situation is just like mine. I'm a 5'3" female too and for better ergonomics for the ride I took my toms off the bass drum and offset them with a stand. I have a 12 and a 13 and the 13 is so deep that it really doesn't even work well in this setup. I have to reach to the 13 and it still touches the bass drum (hence the towel). I feel that my hi-hat is sometimes too far away, but if I move it closer, it will hit the 12 tom. I just got a double bass pedal and I have no idea how I'm going to fit it in. I'm going to have to do some rearranging and that scares me since I'm seriously OCD and have been playing with this setup for a while now.
 

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Rochelle Rochelle

Senior Member
What's the with the mix of low volume and regular cymbals? Asking respectfully.
I tend to keep the LV cymbals on quite a bit for practicing since I take lessons and my teacher comes to my house and my husband works from home occasionally and it's much quieter for them. I don't have an LV ride but I usually have a rubber mute I put over it. I don't bother muting the china or the splash.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
Yes it can be removed. It will either just be pressed on, or be pressed and have a pin. Remove the pin if it has one, then using a block of wood so you don't damage anything, place the block of wood at the base of the collar and gently hammer around the circumference. It will pop the top so to speak, then you can cut the tube. Press the top back on and you are done.

You can also remove the tripod in pretty much the same fashion. It will have a pin, screw, or Allen bolt. The downside to removing the tripod is you must replace the pin/screw/bolt, and that requires taping a new hole. If you don't the tripod base will fall off and your stand will collapse.

In my experiences the inner tube is usually the same length or shorter than the outer tube. This is why you cut both.
Duly noted. I've just decided that buying a new, low-profile snare stand would be my solution. :D
 

dragonfly66

Member
I'd suggest putting both toms back on the stand, and not worry that the snare is exactly "between" them- on my rehearsal kit, I also have my toms on a stand like yours, but the 10" is directly up & in front of my snare. The 12" sits to the right of that, making my two-rack-tom setup kinda in-between your setup and having them mounted on the bass drum. I had to put the front leg of the cymbal stand between the BD and its left spur, but it works. I'll try to get a pic at rehearsal this week.
I like my current set up with the 12 on the bass drum mount in the center of the bass drum. I tried swinging the two toms out when they were both on the cymbal stand, but didn't like the reach for the 12. I did have to do the mingling of the cymbal stand bass drum spur too.

Oh, good lord, no! The pizza-cutter-like tube cutter is so easy and quick, you'll thank the tool gods that it exists. Trust me...
That's why you cut both tubes...
Thank you both for all the advice on shortening my snare stand.

Or open the legs all of the way to make the bottom part lower.
Already did this, so to lower any more I need a low profile stand or cut my existing stand.


I'm late to the game but I'll give a quick rundown on what I do...
Thank you for the advice.


I'm late to this thread but your situation is just like mine. I'm a 5'3" female too and for better ergonomics for the ride I took my toms off the bass drum and offset them with a stand. I have a 12 and a 13 and the 13 is so deep that it really doesn't even work well in this setup. I have to reach to the 13 and it still touches the bass drum (hence the towel). I feel that my hi-hat is sometimes too far away, but if I move it closer, it will hit the 12 tom. I just got a double bass pedal and I have no idea how I'm going to fit it in. I'm going to have to do some rearranging and that scares me since I'm seriously OCD and have been playing with this setup for a while now.
I will take a photo of my set up now. I think it is the best compromise for me. My toms are not deep though. What I've found is the more you raise them the more angle you need. Also that for me they need to be raised and angled in order for me to reach them.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
If you are mechanically inclined, you could save money by modifying the snare stand. All you would really need is a pipe cutter to shorten the tubes. They are easily found at any hardware store in the plumbing section. I have done this before with great success.
Thanks for this suggestion. My dDrum kit includes a 13x7" snare. And it sits just a bit too high. I will have to buy and older used snare stand and try this out.

To the thread starter, I hope you have had better luck dialing in your set. I don't have a problem with height. . .my problem is girth. I'm a large mammal trying to get my body to be comfortable in well, 1/2 a phone booth basically. It takes time doesn't it? Lol
 

Rochelle Rochelle

Senior Member
Looks good Dragonfly! Since you have a 10 and 12 and they aren't very deep that gives you some room to position. My 12 is probably deeper than your 12. I have a lesson on Tues so after that I will embark on my reconfig to try and place my double bass pedal.
 

Tamaefx

Silver Member
The 12" seems to be on your knee ; maybe it's more comfortable for you.
What is the series of your snare drum ?
 

dragonfly66

Member
The 12" seems to be on your knee ; maybe it's more comfortable for you.
What is the series of your snare drum ?
The 12 isn't on my knee. Remember I'm short, my legs are not that long and thus not that tall when seated. And if I sat close enough for my knee to be under the 12 I'll be kicking backward on the bass drum pedal, which isn't good form.

The snare is a Gretsch G4169B USA Custom 6.5"x14" Bronze Snare Drum w/ 10 Lugs.
 
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