Stick Twirling: The Master

BobC

Silver Member
Since that post about hating stick twirling was thankfully closed, here's a positive example of the master at work, the great Dino Danelli, who got his shtick from jazz drummers Sonny Payne and Lionel Hampton. There's no question that Dino had the chops to back up the showmanship. He was the whole package; talent, feel, chops, good looks. He was a major influence on me as a young drummer.


 
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I appreciate twirling
There's a certain aspect to it that is rhythmic. Twirling and drumming aren't two separate things
"When done" well, the twirling has to be integrated into the rhythm
So I admire those that do it well.
(I ain't one of em)
 
Since that post about hating stick twirling was closed, here's a positive example of the master at work, the great Dino Danelli, who got his shtick from jazz drummers Sonny Payne and Lionel Hampton. There's no question that Dino had the chops to back up the showmanship. He was the whole package; talent, feel, chops, good looks. He was a major influence on me as a young drummer.



Man, that guy had chops. What a clean stroke. And the spinning is great too
 
If it’s done really well, its showmanship and entertaining. I like watching drummers that can pull it off. Marching drummers can be amazing to watch as well.
I don’t enjoy it if the drumming sucks because of it.. or the tricks are lame. I think another class of stick tricks that are really impressive are what I call telegraphed body movements.. like overly dramatic, flowing arm, wrist, legs and feet. Kind of full body Moeller on steroids! Guys like Nate Morton on the voice.. what a monster drummer..He throws in cool stick twirls or waves as well as crazy chops and grooves while smacking the heck out of the skins.. and its all one flow..
 
I appreciate twirling
There's a certain aspect to it that is rhythmic. Twirling and drumming aren't two separate things
"When done" well, the twirling has to be integrated into the rhythm
So I admire those that do it well.
(I ain't one of em)
I remember watching a video of Tommy Lee (yes the one that made that wholesome video with Pamela), they are live at some TV show, the throws the stick in the air (I swear over 30 ft high) catches it and continues playing (LIVE!) He was my influence when it came to showmanship because before him all the drummers that I've seen were more in the background, somehow he was able to be just as prominent as the lead singer, and as all of us know that is not easy to accomplish for any drummer. His pretend bashing of the drums is legendary to me. I use that to this day (only when playing live of course) Pretend Bashing= It looks like you are beating the drums like they owe you money, but in reality you are just exaggerating arm movements to make it seem that way, you can play really soft but visually it looks aggressive. (Take note Eloy Casagrande).

This is not the video (in the one I saw before you can see it from the audience perspective so it is easier to gauge how far he threw it) You can still see him in this video it goes quite high and then he retrieves it.

 
For a private party class reunion last month they scripted all the songs. The Young Rascals song was 1 and that's when I saw the stick twirling drummer.

doggyd69, doesn't Peart do that in a documentary?

Billy Idol's drummer does a tasteful display on the punches here.
[Youtube]
 
For a private party class reunion last month they scripted all the songs. The Young Rascals song was 1 and that's when I saw the stick twirling drummer.

doggyd69, doesn't Peart do that in a documentary?

Billy Idol's drummer does a tasteful display on the punches here.
[Youtube]
I don't remember seeing Peart doing stick twirling but then I was more interested in the intricate patters he played... Fun fact, Neil looked a lot like my father in law (as in they could be twins) so I will take a picture with him so I can tell folks that I met Neil.. and he also lives in Canada...
 
I don't remember seeing Peart doing stick twirling but then I was more interested in the intricate patters he played... Fun fact, Neil looked a lot like my father in law (as in they could be twins) so I will take a picture with him so I can tell folks that I met Neil.. and he also lives in Canada...
Lol. That works.

He didn't twirl. And I never saw the film, but someone said he does a slam and catches the stick almost not looking at it. Idk.
I've added some twirls here and there playing.
 
Lol. That works.

He didn't twirl. And I never saw the film, but someone said he does a slam and catches the stick almost not looking at it. Idk.
I've added some twirls here and there playing.
My go to when I started drumming was doing a roll then throwing the stick (maybe about 1 1/2 meters above my head) the catching it and continuing with the song, I did it for so long, it is now automatic. I do it without thinking... but I do it with the stick rotating towards me, I've seen other people do it with the stick rotating away from them, I am trying to master that one, but it is really not important, it is just to add visual interest (like for example I do it when Megadeth's Dave Mustaine does a guitar slide during symphony of destruction, it is a one second slide but the drums stop so it is perfect for that, and the first time I did it, I wasn't thinking about the stick tossing, I was focusing on the song pause my my reflex was to throw the stick. It looked (and sounded) really cool after I watched the video.

Stick forward tossing technique at the 12 second mark:

 
So far I twirl one revolution with my left over my head in the silent part between snare hits. I can twirl one rev with my right the opposite way.
Stick tosses? I've toyed at home with it.
I tried the floor tom slam but couldn't control it, and it's potentially damaging to the bearing edge.
 
I appreciate twirling
There's a certain aspect to it that is rhythmic. Twirling and drumming aren't two separate things
"When done" well, the twirling has to be integrated into the rhythm
So I admire those that do it well.
(I ain't one of em)
If it’s done really well, its showmanship and entertaining. I like watching drummers that can pull it off. Marching drummers can be amazing to watch as well.
I don’t enjoy it if the drumming sucks because of it.. or the tricks are lame. I think another class of stick tricks that are really impressive are what I call telegraphed body movements.. like overly dramatic, flowing arm, wrist, legs and feet. Kind of full body Moeller on steroids! Guys like Nate Morton on the voice.. what a monster drummer..He throws in cool stick twirls or waves as well as crazy chops and grooves while smacking the heck out of the skins.. and its all one flow..
One of my all time favorites to watch is Morgan Rose of Sevendust. Throws his whole body into his playing. Uses his body and pauses in line with the rhythm of the music with seamless stick twirls and spins here and there .
Stick tricks , body movements , brief pauses and the like are like timing mechanisms.
It’s like stank face takes over the rest of the body when you get lost in and are really feeling the music and are in the zone .

Some of the best stick spins and tricks from both hands and incorporated into playing
( although he does do it a lot ) is Mike Terrana.

He does these in songs as well .

 
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I'll work on spinning when my drumming is (much) better...

I've been watching this guy for other reasons, but he has some stick tricks dialed in.

 
I do a one rotation flip with my right hand, been doing it so long I don't even think about it much. It's not really terribly showy. People would have to be watching me fairly closely. It's more for me at this point. But if they see it, it's part of the show...
 
If it’s done really well, its showmanship and entertaining. I like watching drummers that can pull it off. Marching drummers can be amazing to watch as well.
I don’t enjoy it if the drumming sucks because of it.. or the tricks are lame.
100%
I've see FAR too many drummers try to use stick tricks to cover for bad technique or just downright wrong playing.
IF done right, it's great.
 
Since that post about hating stick twirling was closed, here's a positive example of the master at work, the great Dino Danelli, who got his shtick from jazz drummers Sonny Payne and Lionel Hampton. There's no question that Dino had the chops to back up the showmanship. He was the whole package; talent, feel, chops, good looks. He was a major influence on me as a young drummer.



How can anyone watch this and not want to play traditional grip???
 
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