Stick Control or Rudiments

Witterings

Silver Member
In an ideal world I'd have 8 hrs a day I could practice but coming back down to reality with a bump and probably much the same as most my practice time isn't nearly as much as I'd like it to be.
Taking that into consideration if you were to concentrate on just one or the other do you think time is best spent working through Stick Control or going through the 40 Essential Rudiments ??
Any tips on taking those excercises and then incorporating them into fills and if there are any structured methods on how to do that would be greatly appreciated.
 
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TFITTING942

Guest
Tough question without knowing your goals. Do you want stick control for a drumline or rudiments for playing orchestra or something else?
 

shadowlorde

Senior Member
don't concentrate on one or the other ... alternate days of playing both or . maybe .. say in 1/2 hour of practicing .. play 15 minutes on rudiments and 15 on stick control ... if you play each rudiment and SC exercise for 2 mins each .. that's 7 rudiments and 8 examples from stick control .. or 8 rudiments and 7 stick control exercises ... OR if you do each for 5 mins thats 3 and 3 ... i'd say that's not a bad start
 

Chermen

Member
No doubt: rudiments, rudiments and one more rudiments!!! They’re more useful than “Stick Control”
 

Witterings

Silver Member
No doubt: rudiments, rudiments and one more rudiments!!! They’re more useful than “Stick Control”
HHHmmmmm interesting comments from all, I only used your quote because one other person said similar and they said after they'd worked their way through they didn't feel they'd gianed that much in comparison to rudiments.
One of me wekaest things is my left hand and I have spent a lot of time going through the 1st few pages of stick control and I really feel it's hlped massively but you can argue against that and say if you learn to pla a rudiment properly you're left should be as good as your right and you should be able to apply it to fills etc anyway.
I didn't say it at the start as I didn't want to lead anyine in a paticular direction but if you've only ten mins for practice there's no harm in splitting that anto 2 x 5 min slots so maybe I'll keep doing both and see which wins :)
Cheers all !!!
 

oneguy

Senior Member
I'm confused, last time I looked Stick Control was a book of rudiments...
THANKYOU.....!!!!! Being new and practicing in Stick Control right now and thinking I was practicing basic rudiments, I almost asked where to find the basic rudiments.....

Thanks for clearing that up.......
 

zakhopper316

Silver Member
stick control will make your practice time worth every second, if you find yourself cheating and only doing one or the other, work out of stick control, it will help you with your rudiments anyways.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
No doubt: rudiments, rudiments and one more rudiments!!! They’re more useful than “Stick Control”
Last I checked, Stick Control consisted of rudiments. Lemme look again....










....Yup, just as I remember it: singles, doubles, buzz strokes, flams, short and long rolls, ruffs, drags, etc.

G. L. Stone was one of the leading authorities on rudimental drumming in his time. One of the purposes of Stick Control was to provide a template of exercises that would work for all kinds of drummers: rudimental, symphonic, and drum set specialists.
 
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Boomka

Platinum Member
Book of basic rudiments, and variations.
The more complex ones are simply combinations of the basics. It makes no odds. It's instructive that a great number of players known for their rudimental abilities also recommend Stick Control as a go-to text. Gadd, Garibaldi, Igoe, Cobham, the list goes on and on.
 
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Boomka

Platinum Member
In an ideal world I'd have 8 hrs a day I could practice but coming back down to reality with a bump and probably much the same as most my practice time isn't nearly as much as I'd like it to be.
Taking that into consideration if you were to concentrate on just one or the other do you think time is best spent working through Stick Control or going through the 40 Essential Rudiments ??
Any tips on taking those excercises and then incorporating them into fills and if there are any structured methods on how to do that would be greatly appreciated.
The simplest way is to start by playing the sticking on different surfaces. You can simply move your hands randomly to different parts of the kit, searching for sounds and textures, or you can be methodical and start, for instance, with splitting your hands between two surfaces and seeing what results. There are "implied" rhythms in many rudiments that become more obvious once the hands are split to different voices (this can also help with learning and memorising them...)

An example: Take your paradiddles and inversions (or, removing the accents, exercises 5 - 8 on pg. 5 of Stick Control) and play them as 8th and 16th note fills with one hand on the SD and one on the High Tom. See what you can come up with. Experiment and many possibilities will present themselves.

Concentrated and purposeful study of Stick Control or the PAS 40 (or 60, or even "the 2") will wield results. In his latest video, Tommy Igoe keeps harping on a very important idea: "simple things at a high level." It's not so much about which of these you choose to pursue, but HOW and HOW MUCH you work on them. If you can play every note in Stick Control with grace and control at a variety of tempos and dynamics AND/OR you can play the PAS 40 Standard Rudiments with grace and control at a variety of tempos and dynamics you're going to have some very good technical facility with which to express yourself. Don't worry to much about which road to choose. Pick one and get at it.
 
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Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
The more complex ones are simply combinations of the basics. It makes no odds. It's instructive that a great number of players known for their rudimental abilities also recommend Stick Control as a go-to text. Gadd, Garibaldi, Igoe, Cobham, the list goes on and on.
Of course. Like a complicated groove is a mixture of simpler combinations and instrumentations ;).
 

jonescrusher

Pioneer Member
G. L. Stone was one of the leading authorities on rudimental drumming in his time. One of the purposes of Stick Control was to provide a template of exercises that would work for all kinds of drummers: rudimental, symphonic, and drum set specialists.
Yes, the beauty of that book is the 'catch-all' nature of it; it more than covers any practical requirement over drum kit facility. Furthermore, it will prime you for developing the advanced rudiments, should you ever need to use them.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
Indeed. At this point, I should out myself as someone who very strongly feels that 40 rudiments is plenty. More than plenty.... :)
Yes, you will do fine with the traditional 25 ones. Unless you need all the other ones for marching stuff or so.
 
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wy yung

Guest
Stick control is about developing stick control. The idea is to strengthen the technical ability of both hands.

Definition of rudiment.

•A rudiment is basic patterns used in rudimental drumming. These patterns form the basic building blocks or "vocabulary" of drumming, and can be combined in a great variety of ways to create drumming music.
•the elementary stages of any subject (usually plural); "he mastered only the rudiments of geometry"
•the remains of a body part that was functional at an earlier stage of life; "Meckel's diverticulum is the rudiment of the embryonic yolk sac"
•rudimentary - fundamental: being or involving basic facts or principles; "the fundamental laws of the universe"; "a fundamental incomatibility between them ...
•rudimentary - being in the earliest stages of development; "rudimentary plans"
•rudimentary - vestigial: not fully developed in mature animals; "rudimentary wings"
 
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