stick bounce!

iainp999

Junior Member
Hi Everyone,

Been lurking around here for a week or so; just signed up today. Seems like a great forum so far :)

Anyway, I've come looking for a bit of noob advice.

I've been playing drums for a few years without really having a clue what I was doing (I found it quite easy to play rhythms etc. but never got into the technical side of things).

So now I've decided to take lessons and learn rudiments etc. etc. So after my first lesson, my homework is obviously single/double stroke, paradiddle, flams and drags :)

I'm getting the feel of double stroke roll, but finding it difficult to get past a certain speed with it. Also, I'm struggling to maintain the same power in the strokes when I add speed.

Any tips?

I'm using matched grip and I can feel that my left hand's grip is changing through the roll resulting in less stick control/power. Probably a bad habit I developed through lack of training. Any tips on that?

Obviously I'll ask my teacher about this at the next lesson, but thought I'd ask on here first to see if I could iron things out during my practicing.

Anyway, sorry for the lengthy post, and good to be here.

Cheers,
Iain
 
C

Casper "DrPowerStroke" Paludan

Guest
Lain, welcome to the forum. Good first question, and an extremely important one! There are several threads about it if you look in the search function, and there are many opinions and debates, but I will give you my couple of most valuable points on this:

1) there are four basic motions the drumstick can make, regardless of what techniques you use: full, in which the stick starts and ends high; down, in which the stick starts high and ends low, tap, where the stick both starts and ends low; and up, where the stick starts low and ends high.

Now, as regards the double stroke at relatively fast speeds, i.e. speeds where it is not practical to play both strokes as wrist strokes, the second stroke will have some up stroke qualities to it, as you will need to supply some energy in addition to the natural bounce in order to get the stick back to the starting position and produce a smooth roll. Does that make sense? So you must find a way to deal with that. It can vary with the speed and volume, but you will supply some energy on the second stroke. We can get into how later.

2) JoJo Mayer explains many intricacies on the double stroke on his Secret Weapons DVD. If you are interested in drum technique, you should get it (it is on Netflix!), and study it.

Hope this helps for a start on this very fundamental and challenging rudiment!

Casper
 

iainp999

Junior Member
Hi Casper,

Thanks for the reply; your description of the theory makes sense to me, I guess I just have to keep at it until I find the feel for it?

I've been looking through the threads on the forum, and the JoJo DVD is mentioned a hell of a lot, so I think I'll grab that. I'm taught at a local drum shop, and they had this DVD for sale the last time I was there, so I'll pick it up when I have my next lesson in a week or so!

Thanks,
Iain
 
C

Casper "DrPowerStroke" Paludan

Guest
Good!

You're welcome! Remember, record yourself, and if it doesn't sound even, it's not right. If the two strokes are not equal in volume, it's not right. So do whatever it taakes.
Cheers,
Casper
 

CipWep

Junior Member
stick bounce

You can use your bottom 3 fingers to bounce the stick with more power and speed than if you were just using your thumb and pointer finger. Also, it may not feel like it just yet, but they will help keep the stick in line so your stroke will be more true.

Just be aware that they have to move with the stick; they cant remain closed like it is in the picture.
 
S

SethDavis1200

Guest
Hi Everyone,

Been lurking around here for a week or so; just signed up today. Seems like a great forum so far :)

Anyway, I've come looking for a bit of noob advice.

I've been playing drums for a few years without really having a clue what I was doing (I found it quite easy to play rhythms etc. but never got into the technical side of things).

So now I've decided to take lessons and learn rudiments etc. etc. So after my first lesson, my homework is obviously single/double stroke, paradiddle, flams and drags :)

I'm getting the feel of double stroke roll, but finding it difficult to get past a certain speed with it. Also, I'm struggling to maintain the same power in the strokes when I add speed.

Any tips?

I'm using matched grip and I can feel that my left hand's grip is changing through the roll resulting in less stick control/power. Probably a bad habit I developed through lack of training. Any tips on that?

Obviously I'll ask my teacher about this at the next lesson, but thought I'd ask on here first to see if I could iron things out during my practicing.

Anyway, sorry for the lengthy post, and good to be here.

Cheers,
Iain
Five Rudiments seems to be an awful lot for your
first lesson. What most and even teachers sometimes forget is
quality before quantity. First things first though. You MUST develop your
hand technique, whatever that is going to be...

You really want both hands to be indentical, exception would
be if you are utilizing traditional grip with the left hand.

Second, Make absolutely sure all 4 fingers are wrapped around
both drumsticks. This is Vital, no exceptions.

Third, Stroke every not when playing a long roll, do not be misled about
letting fingers or bounce manipulate the roll. You play the roll, not the sticks.
This will develop serious strength in your wrist.

Fourth, Don't worry about speed. Worry about your overall sound,
Cleaness, proficiency, height, and understanding of the rudiment before moving
to something else.

I show traditional and matched grip examples on my channel as
well as Single Stroke Rolls of course.

www.youtube.com/themoellerkiller

Seth Davis
 
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