Stewart Copeland

Pavlos

Senior Member
Well okay. But what other bands did he play in? Were people clamoring to get him in their band? What I meant by the Moon comparison is that Copeland's playing seemed perfectly suited for that band. His feel/influences seemed to really give that group their specific sound, much like Moon. But I couldn't imagine Moon playing with another group and I haven't heard a band that would utilize Copeland's strengths with what he did with the Police - those reggae-inspired grooves, etc.
Stew hasn't played with a ton of groups but did play with Oysterhead and Animal Logic. I wasn't crazy about Animal Logic but I loved Oysterhead which he said in a recent interview he wants to do again after the Police reunion tour. He also worked with Stan Ridgeway (wall of voodoo) for the Rumblefish soundtrack and on one of the MD fests he played with a band called Gizmo which sounded great to me,

I think he could be good in lots of bands but maybe preferred all the soundtrack composing work after being in the Police, maybe because he had more control over the project that way.

Then there's this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3F8rB1waAQ
I love that video!
 

ZildjianMan1023

Silver Member
idk what nationality he is, because his accent is kind of confusing

but hes an amazing drummer


and probably a cool guy for putting up with sting all these years


LOL
 

Jackofalldrums

Junior Member
Copeland is my favourite, his grooves are so different and unique the fact that as a person he is very inteligent enforces his position on drums.


Murder by numbers, pure genius
 

Klark Kent

Junior Member
idk what nationality he is, because his accent is kind of confusing

but hes an amazing drummer


and probably a cool guy for putting up with sting all these years


LOL
Stewart was born in Alexandria, Virginia, but his family relocated to the middle east particularly Beirut when he was a few months old. So, his accent is a combination of his American roots, his fluent arabic and years of touring with british musicians, haha
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
I have been watching the "Synchronicity" tour on my mp3 player. One jam I really like is "One world is enough (for all of us)". It convinced me to get a low pitched set of octabans. I love the accents and fills in this tune.
 
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Aggressivec

Guest
Copeland does stuff with the hi-hat that I wish I had thought of. I always try to do some of his tricks but sometimes they come out horrible! I wish I could do it as articulate and clean as he did.
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
Copeland does stuff with the hi-hat that I wish I had thought of. I always try to do some of his tricks but sometimes they come out horrible! I wish I could do it as articulate and clean as he did.
The intro to "Walking on the moon" always intruiged me. It's his work, but there is some reverb added for effect.

His kit has always sounded good, and his playing crisp and tasetful along the raggae groove lines.
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
At the end of this month, I am picking up 24/22/20/18" set of DDRUM deccabons so that my kit will be more like Stewarts.
 
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trkdrmr

Guest
Then vs now...

Then... Synchronicity tour:
Stewart and the guys played IMO, just what needed to be played. It was pretty straight forward and they grooved where they needed. I did not like the remake of "Don't stand so close to me" as much as the original version. To me, it lost impact. One of the highlights was "One world (not three)" and the jam they did.

Now: latest tour:
The dvd performance and extra features indicate to me they were vying for more personal space on each tune. It seems like extra things were stuck in the drum parts where they weren't needed. Sting, of course had to over-stylize the vocals to what was perfect the first time around. While I like this dvd, I prefer the original performances, without the added gloss. At some points, Sting was almost a lilting, Vegas lounge-lizard version of earlier efforts.
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Placement of the kick drum where the snare hit would normally be is a wonderful thing to play and you almost have to unlearn everything to do it.

His inventiveness is what I appreciate about him and the ability to flit from reggae to rock within the gap of a flam. I have an instruction DVD on Copeland but rather annoyingly the tutor is left-handed, which is rather useless to a RHer like me. Now clearly if you are LHed than you are the lucky ones for a change.

Davo
 
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nhzoso

Guest
Copeland does stuff with the hi-hat that I wish I had thought of. I always try to do some of his tricks but sometimes they come out horrible! I wish I could do it as articulate and clean as he did.
Just started really getting into his drumming can you give me some examples of this hi hat stuff?
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Just started really getting into his drumming can you give me some examples of this hi hat stuff?
The best example, in my opinion, is the song "Walking on the Moon."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLndLjMibyM

The basic groove is 8th on the hi-hat, but Copeland throws in lots of 16ths, and then starts throwing in some poly rhythms and various assorted syncopations on the hi-hats as drum fills.

2nd great example is the original version of "Don't Stand So Close to Me" (there is a 2nd version the Police put out a few years later with a drum machine).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXU8kCrRHJY
Copelands dynamics on the hi-hat are what drive the verses.
 

bamdrummer

Senior Member
Stewart Copeland is a frickin' amazing drummer. I probably wouldn't have known what a splash cymbal was without him.
 

DanGordon

Junior Member
Stewart Copeland unique traditional grip

Have you guys ever noticed that Copeland uses a kind of unique traditional grip?

He uses - most of the time - his middle finger under the stick, so having three - and not two fingers - as the supporting ones.
The only finger on top of the stick is the index finger.

Incredibly I just noticed this today as I'm now paying more attention to traditional grip players cause I started practicing traditional grip a few moths ago after 24 years playing exclusively matched.

And curiously, two days ago I moved my middle finger to the bottom of the stick just to try new things and experiment.
And I liked the way it feels.

:)

Well, I'll keep practicing the classic traditional grip, but the way Copeland uses it is interesting. And as I suddenly liked the way it felt I think I'll try to develop that too.


Cheers!
 

KlarkKent

Senior Member
The best example, in my opinion, is the song "Walking on the Moon."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLndLjMibyM

The basic groove is 8th on the hi-hat, but Copeland throws in lots of 16ths, and then starts throwing in some poly rhythms and various assorted syncopations on the hi-hats as drum fills.

2nd great example is the original version of "Don't Stand So Close to Me" (there is a 2nd version the Police put out a few years later with a drum machine).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXU8kCrRHJY
Copelands dynamics on the hi-hat are what drive the verses.
Another very good, clear example of his hi-hat work:

1. "Darkness," from Ghost in the Machine: the whole song is basically Stewart playing the hi-hat with accents on the bass drum, feathered.

2. The opening to Peter Gabriel's "Red Rain," from So: Stewart plays the hi-hat intro for this song (and plays the full session for "Big Time").
 

Davo-London

Gold Member
Sat up last night and watched a ton of Copeland/Police youtube vids.

Boy, did he hit hard. I would love to have a fraction of his groove. He always was a very consistent player. My old tutor would critique the fact that he would speed up sections of a song (chorus), but I wonder whether he did that on purpose.

Very inspiring.

Davo
 
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