Stewart Copeland

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Boy, did he hit hard. I would love to have a fraction of his groove. He always was a very consistent player. My old tutor would critique the fact that he would speed up sections of a song (chorus), but I wonder whether he did that on purpose.

Very inspiring.
Agree with all of that. YouTube just recommended to me this scorching performance of Driven to Tears: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LvCmsmJ8Xs

The question is ... does the music still sound great in the sped up parts? I say YES. When a band can rock out that hard and with so much pizazz, I couldn't care less about the details. Maybe he does it on purpose, but without realising it - going for major intensity ... and achieving it.
 

Alesi

Member
I really don't care about how he speeds up. In fact, there's some tunes in the The Police Live album that have that kind of "lack of time". But, I think about Copeland most of an extremely intuitive-tasty player. I mean, if he doesn't speed up, it wouldn't be Stewart Copeland. John Bonham is another drummer that sped up in a lot of song, but how I would point that out in tunes like "trampled under foot", for instance. It works.
 

Brundlefly

Senior Member
I really don't care about how he speeds up. In fact, there's some tunes in the The Police Live album that have that kind of "lack of time". But, I think about Copeland most of an extremely intuitive-tasty player. I mean, if he doesn't speed up, it wouldn't be Stewart Copeland. John Bonham is another drummer that sped up in a lot of song, but how I would point that out in tunes like "trampled under foot", for instance. It works.
/agree. It wasn't always on purpose, which he has admitted. But that doesn't mean it sounds wrong either. In many cases, it's what made the song get up and move. A really great example of this can be found on the Oysterhead song Army's On Ecstasy. Besides, there tends to be a different view on this stuff today because everyone is so used to hearing gridded music. Back then, this was normal and nobody cared.

BTW, that Driven To Tears link may be one of the worst versions of that song I've heard from them. Go back a ways to the time before Sting sterilized everything and take listen.
 

LinearDrummer

Silver Member
Sat up last night and watched a ton of Copeland/Police youtube vids.

Boy, did he hit hard. I would love to have a fraction of his groove. He always was a very consistent player. My old tutor would critique the fact that he would speed up sections of a song (chorus), but I wonder whether he did that on purpose.

Very inspiring.

Davo
Good points!
He definitely speed up alot live but...the man cracked those backbeats (T-grip) like no other!
 

Pachikara-Tharakan

Silver Member
love his drumming, his double strokes, so unique, he is a unique drummer, in playing and in looks as well....to me he doesnt fit in with all today's flashy head banging dudes!
 
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I really don't care about how he speeds up. In fact, there's some tunes in the The Police Live album that have that kind of "lack of time". But, I think about Copeland most of an extremely intuitive-tasty player. I mean, if he doesn't speed up, it wouldn't be Stewart Copeland. John Bonham is another drummer that sped up in a lot of song, but how I would point that out in tunes like "trampled under foot", for instance. It works.
The old drummers had their own sound and style.

Now every drummer sounds the same.
All these flashy licks lol.

I could tell Bonham or Bruford or Giles or Cobham by their feel and tone,not their chops.

Todays scene seems so competititive.

The fastest drummer,who can play the most grips,who can out do each other instead of focussing on the music.

I 'd love to learn all that tech stuff but my heart is in't in to it.

I see a dvd of a bloke playing some flashy stuff and the song is usually really cheesy fusion stuff with really 80s sounds lol and that's the only time you can use those flashy techniques,with really cheesy music.

The soul of music has dimished somewhat for the purpose of compettitiveness.

My feelings.

You can hate me.

I hate myself more so fire away.

Just prefer something like Cobhams Spectrum with soul than todays shyte with cheesy cheesy tone and songs.

"that guy is no good"
Why
"he doesn't have trad grip for a start"

"and?"
"he doesn't know how to play moellor grip"

LMAO.
 

Pachikara-Tharakan

Silver Member
The old drummers had their own sound and style.

Now every drummer sounds the same.
All these flashy licks lol.


Todays scene seems so competititive.

The fastest drummer,who can play the most grips,who can out do each other instead of focussing on the music.

I 'd love to learn all that tech stuff but my heart is in't in to it.
my thoughts as well :)
 

joshvibert

Senior Member
I REALLY enjoy Stuart's playing in the early 80's with the Police, but the two performance videos posted of him here are horrible. He is probably focusing a lot more on composing nowadays, but still, if you're going to play something like a solo on Letterman, at least get in the woodshed and work your chops up a bit. Unfortunately, his ego seems to have increased as much as his chops have decreased. As far as drumming goes, he's now and overly-arrogant has-been.
 

Dirtysticks

Senior Member
I love him with the Police. He had such a signature style and feel! I've stolen some of his grooves and used them in different genres lol!
 

jimb

Member
Ive often wondered if Vinnie was secretly influenced by him...Copeland is a seriously underrated musician.
 

PaulD

Member
I'm a bit surprised anyone would call Copeland underrated. I went to high school in the 80s and had a lot of friends who were drummers. Him, Peart, Bonham and Moon were Mt. Rushmore as far as we were concerned.
 
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